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World Zionist Organization

NEWS
June 22, 1985 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
In his most extensive public remarks on the incident to date, Israeli Prime Minister Shimon Peres said Friday that he understands the TWA hijacking was planned more than a month ago. He said the hijacking is making it more difficult to release the 760 or so mostly Shia Muslim prisoners held in northern Israel, because Israel must be concerned "not to give the impression of a general surrender to hijackers."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1998 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the crack team from El Camino Real High School competes this weekend at the U.S. Academic Decathlon, a West Hills synagogue is prepping six youngsters on Genesis, Psalms and other texts in hopes of winning honors for the ninth straight year at the National Bible Contest. Shomrei Torah Synagogue's entries have taken 11 of 16 possible national titles since 1990 in the competition in New York City sponsored by World Zionist Organization. The U.S.
NEWS
January 11, 1985 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
Israel's two largest political blocs have agreed to set up six new West Bank settlements by this fall. They would be the first to be built under the national unity government that took office four months ago. The decision, announced Thursday, was made Wednesday night by officials named by the Cabinet to consider new settlements. Formal approval by the full Cabinet is considered certain.
NEWS
January 27, 1991 | CHRISTINA V. GODBEY
Charles Kraus, better known to children as Charles the Clown, is celebrating 20 years of performing for audiences in the Los Angeles area. Over the years, the West Los Angeles resident has appeared at recreation centers, department stores, hospitals and birthday parties in his big shoes, striped tie, checked trousers and painted face. As a youth, Kraus worked as a junior magician and entertained children and their families. In 1970, he arrived in Los Angeles and got into the clowning business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1998 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 12-year-old Winnetka girl tied for first place in her age group Sunday at the National Bible Contest in New York City, giving a well-versed synagogue team from West Hills its 11th national winner in nine years at the Jewish biblical competition. "I can't believe it," said Hasti Sanandajifar, who tied a Cleveland girl for first in the English-language contest for boys and girls ages 11 to 13. "I was trying for first, but I didn't think I'd get it," Hasti said in a telephone interview.
NEWS
June 10, 1990 | SHELDON ITO
At 93, Rose Calvert keeps a pace that would be the envy of even the most aerobics-crazy, bran-muffin eating Baby Boomer. Among other activities, Culver City's 1990 "Senior Citizen of the Year" spends each weekday at the city's senior center, sorting stamps as a fund-raiser for the blind, playing bingo, singing in the choir and serving on the center's board of directors.
NEWS
January 31, 1991 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the day the war began, Sharon Mandel, a registered nurse from West Los Angeles, decided to volunteer to go to Israel and help out any way she could. "I'm Jewish," Mandel said Wednesday, explaining her decision. "I'm not a religious person. I don't speak Hebrew very well. But I just have very strong feelings toward the state of Israel. It hit me right away that Israel might really be drawn in to this, and I didn't want to be sitting over here on the sidelines."
NEWS
July 27, 1993 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The deputy foreign minister of Israel was a "little slime ball," declared the vice president of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, accusing him of endangering Israel's security in peace talks with the Arabs and then lying about it. The committee, the deputy foreign minister replied, was a "right-wing Jewish organization," apparently opposed to peace and clearly harboring "extremist" views.
NEWS
April 12, 1998 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spoken Hebrew had been all but dead for 1,700 years when Eliezer Ben-Yehuda and his wife, Deborah, moved from Russia to Palestine in the late 19th century and decided to speak the biblical language in their new home. Jews in Palestine spoke Yiddish, Arabic and the early Sephardic dialect Ladino in 1881. Hebrew was used for Jewish prayer and study, but it was nobody's mother tongue. Yet Ben-Yehuda was determined to make it his children's native language--and that of an entire nation.
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