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Worldwide Aeros Corp

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores and Don Bartletti
A portion of the roof of a World War II-era blimp hangar in Tustin collapsed early Monday, damaging a $35-million experimental zeppelin and triggering a helium leak. Employees at the hangar were evacuated and a hazardous material teams was working to contain the leak, Orange County Fire Authority Capt. Steve Concialdi said. "We had a collapse of a large section and it fell onto a blimp that caused damage," Concialdi said. He said the incident was reported at 7:45 a.m. The extent of the damage was unknown and the cause has not been determined,  Concialdi said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2013 | Adolfo Flores
A 266-foot experimental airship that is being constructed inside an enormous World War II-era blimp hangar in Tustin was damaged Monday when a portion of the structure's roof collapsed. Falling wood from the roof struck the $35-million airship, a prototype being built under a government contract, and caused a blast of helium to be released, forcing the evacuation of the area. Officials with Worldwide Aeros Corp. said the damage to the airship is "repairable" but declined to be specific.
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BUSINESS
September 10, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
A massive experimental airship briefly lumbered into the skies in front of the former military base in Tustin, where shifting winds kept it from making its first untethered flight. The 266-foot-long Aeroscraft was built by Worldwide Aeros Corp. with more than $50 million in funding from the Pentagon and NASA to demonstrate a novel buoyancy system that enables the airship to carry heavy loads -- and to move vertically with the precision of a helicopter. The helium-filled airship's only cargo Tuesday was two passengers, test pilot Corky Belanger and Aeroscraft inventor Igor Pasternak .  VIDEO: Test pilot tours the Aeroscraft Not long after sunrise, the airship slowly climbed to about 20 feet, kicking up clouds of dust and debris in front of one of the two 17-story wooden blimp hangars in Tustin, where the silver airship was built.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2013 | By Adolfo Flores and Don Bartletti
A portion of the roof of a World War II-era blimp hangar in Tustin collapsed early Monday, damaging a $35-million experimental zeppelin and triggering a helium leak. Employees at the hangar were evacuated and a hazardous material teams was working to contain the leak, Orange County Fire Authority Capt. Steve Concialdi said. "We had a collapse of a large section and it fell onto a blimp that caused damage," Concialdi said. He said the incident was reported at 7:45 a.m. The extent of the damage was unknown and the cause has not been determined,  Concialdi said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2013 | Adolfo Flores
A 266-foot experimental airship that is being constructed inside an enormous World War II-era blimp hangar in Tustin was damaged Monday when a portion of the structure's roof collapsed. Falling wood from the roof struck the $35-million airship, a prototype being built under a government contract, and caused a blast of helium to be released, forcing the evacuation of the area. Officials with Worldwide Aeros Corp. said the damage to the airship is "repairable" but declined to be specific.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2000 | JERRY HIRSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several times a year, would-be inventors stride into the Federal Aviation Administration's Long Beach office with some naive plan to build an aircraft. FAA engineer Maureen Moreland typically whips out an 1,100-page volume of regulations and answers a few questions. That's usually enough to send budding Wright Brothers back to their garage workshops, never to be seen again.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2012 | By Patrick McMahon
Worldwide Aeros Corp., a Montebello developer and maker of blimps used for surveillance, advertising and transport, is celebrating 25 years of building “lighter than air” aircraft. The company was founded by Igor Pasternak, 47, in 1987 in the Ukraine. He immigrated to U.S. in 1993 and continued to built the business in Southern California. Later this year, the company expects to complete and demonstrate its most ambitious project yet: a new cargo aircraft being built for the Pentagon using technology that would enable multi-ton shipments to be transported via a blimp-like craft.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Worldwide Aeros Corp., the Montebello developer and maker of blimps used for surveillance, advertising and transport, opened a 45,000-square-foot engineering facility to house work underway on a mammoth 66-ton rigid airship. The company is expanding in part to build the blimp-like aircraft, which would travel at about 120 mph and could take off and land vertically. The idea is that the airship will ferry multi-ton cargo loads back and forth for the military. The new facility, adjacent to Aeros' headquarters and dubbed the Center of Innovation, opened Tuesday in a ceremony attended by state politicians.
BUSINESS
September 1, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Not since the waning days of World War II have the mammoth wooden blimp hangars at the former military base in Tustin seen as much airship manufacturing work as they do today. Inside the 17-story structures that rise above southern Orange County, Worldwide Aeros Corp. is building a blimp-like airship designed for the military to carry tons of cargo to remote areas around the world. "Nobody has ever tried to do what we're doing here," Chief Executive Igor Pasternak said of the 265-foot skeleton being transformed into the cargo airship.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2009 | W.J. Hennigan
The gig: Igor Pasternak, 45, is the founder and chief executive of Worldwide Aeros Corp., a Montebello-based developer and maker of blimps used for surveillance, advertising and transport. Childhood: Pasternak grew up in Lviv, a Ukrainian city of 700,000 near the Polish border in the former Soviet Union. It was his childhood dream to become an airship designer after he saw pictures of blimps in a magazine. "It was something that I fell in love with right away," he said.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
A massive experimental airship briefly lumbered into the skies in front of the former military base in Tustin, where shifting winds kept it from making its first untethered flight. The 266-foot-long Aeroscraft was built by Worldwide Aeros Corp. with more than $50 million in funding from the Pentagon and NASA to demonstrate a novel buoyancy system that enables the airship to carry heavy loads -- and to move vertically with the precision of a helicopter. The helium-filled airship's only cargo Tuesday was two passengers, test pilot Corky Belanger and Aeroscraft inventor Igor Pasternak .  VIDEO: Test pilot tours the Aeroscraft Not long after sunrise, the airship slowly climbed to about 20 feet, kicking up clouds of dust and debris in front of one of the two 17-story wooden blimp hangars in Tustin, where the silver airship was built.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2000 | JERRY HIRSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several times a year, would-be inventors stride into the Federal Aviation Administration's Long Beach office with some naive plan to build an aircraft. FAA engineer Maureen Moreland typically whips out an 1,100-page volume of regulations and answers a few questions. That's usually enough to send budding Wright Brothers back to their garage workshops, never to be seen again.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1997 | MATTHEW YI, ASSOCIATED PRESS
With sparks flying from blowtorches and cranes moving steel beams, the gigantic hangar that used to house B-52 bombers is now filled with workers building temporary classrooms. "They've been going like gangbusters," said Richard Martin, a former Air Force wing commander who oversees operations at what used to be Castle Air Force Base. "The plant produces about 20 of these modular units per day. They're going out of here day and night."
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