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Worldwide Church Of God

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NEWS
September 25, 1995 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joseph W. Tkach, head of the Pasadena-based Worldwide Church of God, died Saturday of complications from bone cancer at Huntington Memorial Hospital. He was 68. Tkach headed the church since 1986, when he succeeded Herbert W. Armstrong, founder of the 95,000-member Christian denomination, which until recently ran the Ambassador Auditorium and Ambassador College in Pasadena.
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BUSINESS
November 10, 2004 | Roger Vincent
The Worldwide Church of God will move its headquarters offices from the former Ambassador College campus in Pasadena to Glendora as the church continues to sell off its Pasadena property. The church paid Caltrol Inc. $5.3 million for a 55,400-square-foot, two-story building at 2011 E. Financial Way in Glendora, said real estate broker Linda Lee of Grubb & Ellis, who represented the buyers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1995 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Faced with a deepening financial crisis, the Worldwide Church of God has quietly auctioned off a trove of sterling silver purchased by its late founder, Herbert W. Armstrong. The high-quality silver, used by Armstrong during formal dinner parties for heads of state and other luminaries, was sold for an undisclosed price last month by Christie's auction house in New York, the Pasadena-based church confirmed Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2004 | Chris Pasles
After 10 years of being dark, Ambassador Auditorium in Pasadena will reopen to classical music in December. Harvest Rock Church, the new owner of the 1,250-seat hall, widely considered one of the finest in Southern California, will launch the opening with performances of Handel's "Messiah," Dec. 17 and 18. Jorge Mester will conduct the Pasadena Symphony and the Los Angeles Master Chorale.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1995 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Already shaken by defections and the formation of breakaway churches in a battle over doctrine, the Pasadena-based Worldwide Church of God reeled Wednesday from yet another fracture, as a group of its highest-ranking pastors organized a new denomination called the United Church of God.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1995 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Already shaken by defections and the formation of breakaway churches in a battle over doctrine, the Pasadena-based Worldwide Church of God reeled Wednesday from yet another fracture, as a group of its highest-ranking pastors organized a new denomination called the United Church of God.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1997 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Marking a major milestone in its movement toward mainstream Christianity, the once cultish Worldwide Church of God has been accepted into full membership by the nation's largest association of evangelical churches. Officials with the National Assn. of Evangelicals have overwhelmingly voted to admit the Pasadena-based church into the fold after a detailed examination of its doctrines. Best known for its Plain Truth magazine and the teachings of its late founder, Herbert W.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2004 | Chris Pasles
After 10 years of being dark, Ambassador Auditorium in Pasadena will reopen to classical music in December. Harvest Rock Church, the new owner of the 1,250-seat hall, widely considered one of the finest in Southern California, will launch the opening with performances of Handel's "Messiah," Dec. 17 and 18. Jorge Mester will conduct the Pasadena Symphony and the Los Angeles Master Chorale.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1996
The Worldwide Church of God disclosed Tuesday another round of staff layoffs from its sprawling headquarters in Pasadena. Employees were informed at an afternoon meeting that some of them would lose their jobs, but would not say how many. They were told they would be formally notified of their status within days. There are 342 full-time employees at the headquarters. Another 239 full-time ministers serve congregations throughout the United States.
BUSINESS
November 10, 2004 | Roger Vincent
The Worldwide Church of God will move its headquarters offices from the former Ambassador College campus in Pasadena to Glendora as the church continues to sell off its Pasadena property. The church paid Caltrol Inc. $5.3 million for a 55,400-square-foot, two-story building at 2011 E. Financial Way in Glendora, said real estate broker Linda Lee of Grubb & Ellis, who represented the buyers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2002 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stanley Robert Rader, the long-time confidant of the late Herbert W. Armstrong of the Worldwide Church of God, has died. He was 71. Rader, who successfully battled California during a church finance scandal and then won passage of legislation blocking fiscal investigations of any religious group by the state, died Tuesday in Pasadena, two weeks after he was diagnosed with acute pancreatic cancer. For years, Rader often was at the center of tumultuous events in the church's history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2001 | MARK A. KELLNER, Mark A. Kellner is a freelance writer in Marina del Rey
From his first trip to Hollywood in 1947 until his death 39 years later at 93, Herbert W. Armstrong's career as a religious entrepreneur was one of the most spectacular Southern California had ever seen. In his prime--and for years beyond--he combined radio flair, marketing prowess and a quirky theological smorgasbord to build a luxuriously appointed 50-acre Pasadena campus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1997 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Marking a major milestone in its movement toward mainstream Christianity, the once cultish Worldwide Church of God has been accepted into full membership by the nation's largest association of evangelical churches. Officials with the National Assn. of Evangelicals have overwhelmingly voted to admit the Pasadena-based church into the fold after a detailed examination of its doctrines. Best known for its Plain Truth magazine and the teachings of its late founder, Herbert W.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1996
The Worldwide Church of God disclosed Tuesday another round of staff layoffs from its sprawling headquarters in Pasadena. Employees were informed at an afternoon meeting that some of them would lose their jobs, but would not say how many. They were told they would be formally notified of their status within days. There are 342 full-time employees at the headquarters. Another 239 full-time ministers serve congregations throughout the United States.
NEWS
November 26, 1995 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
The self-proclaimed prophet, while he lived, foretold many things that were to be. He spoke of a coming worldwide upheaval. He spoke of the Second Coming of Jesus Christ. But Herbert W. Armstrong never foresaw the upheaval now being visited upon the church he founded. It was not to be the end of the world, but the end of the Worldwide Church of God as he knew it--and his vaunted place on the battlements of belief.
NEWS
September 25, 1995 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joseph W. Tkach, head of the Pasadena-based Worldwide Church of God, died Saturday of complications from bone cancer at Huntington Memorial Hospital. He was 68. Tkach headed the church since 1986, when he succeeded Herbert W. Armstrong, founder of the 95,000-member Christian denomination, which until recently ran the Ambassador Auditorium and Ambassador College in Pasadena.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1989 | JOHN DART, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Ambassador College, a small Pasadena school run by the sectarian Worldwide Church of God and best known for its Ambassador Auditorium, announced Thursday it will shut down after the spring semester and consolidate its student body at its Texas campus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1995 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Faced with a deepening financial crisis, the Worldwide Church of God has quietly auctioned off a trove of sterling silver purchased by its late founder, Herbert W. Armstrong. The high-quality silver, used by Armstrong during formal dinner parties for heads of state and other luminaries, was sold for an undisclosed price last month by Christie's auction house in New York, the Pasadena-based church confirmed Thursday.
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