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Worry Beads

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TRAVEL
August 11, 2002 | MIJA RIEDEL
"They're plastic," Aris Evangelinos said as he snatched the worry beads from my husband's hand and put a match to them. The orange and yellow beads were wrapped in flames. Evangelinos waited a moment, put his nose to the beads and sniffed. I scanned their edges. Plastic would melt; amber would burn. Peter's komboloi did neither. Evangelinos, founder and curator of the Komboloi Museum in Nafplion, Greece, was uncertain. Peter's mood improved immediately.
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TRAVEL
August 11, 2002 | MIJA RIEDEL
"They're plastic," Aris Evangelinos said as he snatched the worry beads from my husband's hand and put a match to them. The orange and yellow beads were wrapped in flames. Evangelinos waited a moment, put his nose to the beads and sniffed. I scanned their edges. Plastic would melt; amber would burn. Peter's komboloi did neither. Evangelinos, founder and curator of the Komboloi Museum in Nafplion, Greece, was uncertain. Peter's mood improved immediately.
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NEWS
October 30, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
You could argue that men in the Middle East wear Western-style jackets so they can stash their beads in a nice loose pocket. A shirt pocket is a bit small, and a pants pocket is too tight, and you might have keys and coins in there as well. Traditional Arab gowns have slash pockets--not bad. The point is not to worry about it. Worry beads won't help you there. An informal survey of peddlers and users on the purpose of the addictive beads produced only one consistent reaction.
NEWS
October 30, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
You could argue that men in the Middle East wear Western-style jackets so they can stash their beads in a nice loose pocket. A shirt pocket is a bit small, and a pants pocket is too tight, and you might have keys and coins in there as well. Traditional Arab gowns have slash pockets--not bad. The point is not to worry about it. Worry beads won't help you there. An informal survey of peddlers and users on the purpose of the addictive beads produced only one consistent reaction.
TRAVEL
August 25, 2002
Regarding "Getting a Bead on Anxiety and Greek Culture," Aug. 11: I saw worry beads for the first time when I was a young man and spent a couple of weeks on Corfu, Greece. I was in a cafe, and a man sitting at a table by himself was rattling them in his hand. I figured he had bought them as a bracelet for his girlfriend, and because she was late in arriving, he was annoyed. It's funny how we can interpret or misinterpret other cultures. KURT SIPOLSKI Palm Desert
NEWS
October 23, 1989 | From Associated Press
President Hashemi Rafsanjani today offered to help gain freedom for 18 Western hostages in Lebanon if Washington releases frozen Iranian assets or helps resolve the cases of three kidnaped Iranians. He appeared to refer to Iranians kidnaped by the Lebanese Forces militia in north Lebanon in 1982, along with their Lebanese driver, a Shiite Muslim. All four are believed dead. Speaking to a news conference attended by mostly foreign reporters, Rafsanjani also ruled out any participation by U.S.
NEWS
April 13, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
A Kuwait Airways Boeing 747 jet carrying former President George Bush and his wife, Barbara, on a trip to Kuwait made an emergency landing here Monday after part of the left wing peeled away, aviation officials said. None of the 59 people aboard the plane were injured when it landed at Houston Intercontinental Airport, about an hour after it left Ellington Field, about 20 miles south.
OPINION
May 4, 2003
Re "Bush Hails Victory in Iraq," May 2: How long will the American people allow the government to lie to them? In declaring an end to major hostilities in Iraq, President Bush cynically played on the emotion of the Sept. 11 attacks by once again citing a link between Al Qaeda and Saddam Hussein. Never mind that Osama bin Laden had encouraged Iraqis to rise up against Hussein and his secular government. If it can be used to manipulate the masses, Bush is not beneath telling the same lie so many times that some people just start to accept it. Now those in the majority Shiite Muslim community that Hussein kept down with force are rising up to declare their desire for a Muslim government, just as many experts predicted before Bush's ill-advised war. That's just what we need, another fundamentalist government in the Middle East that probably will give support and funding to Al Qaeda -- unlike Hussein, who was No. 2 on its hit list, behind us. Patrick Mallon San Luis Obispo I don't know if President Bush intended to change American foreign policy or not. We used to always wait till we were attacked before we responded.
WORLD
December 16, 2011 | By Alexandra Zavis and Rima Marrouch, Los Angeles Times
In a rocky valley at the northern tip of Lebanon, three generations of a Syrian farming family cluster around a small gas heater in the derelict schoolhouse that has become their refuge. When there is electricity, they are glued to the television, which transmits grainy amateur video of chanting protesters and bloodied bodies just across the border in their strife-torn home province of Homs. Interrupting one another in a rush to be heard, family members describe communities under siege by an iron-fisted state, and village turning against village in a chilling cycle of abductions, beatings and killings.
NEWS
September 18, 1990 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Abdullah Moussawr was driving to work on the morning of Aug. 2 when he came upon a crowd in downtown Kuwait city. Suddenly, he realized that cars along the road were not parked, but abandoned. The street in front of him was blocked. He saw Iraqi soldiers. A soldier approached Moussawr, 34, and ordered him out of his car, but he stepped on the gas instead. The soldier shouted, "Stop," and fired a rifle into the air, but Moussawr sped over the center divider in a U-turn and escaped.
NEWS
May 31, 1991 | BETH ANN KRIER, AND JEANNINE STEINTIMES STAFF WRITERS
DEAR HOT SHOPPERS: Remember when making things from scratch meant you were over the top on the goof-o-meter? After all, it meant you had dreaded time on your hands . Now that we're in the self-sufficient '90s--when having leisure time is a badge of honor--all that's changed, and being labeled artsy-craftsy isn't an insult. We've found two resources for reborn do-it-yourselfers: One is Chameleon, a boutique at 8422 1/2 W. 3rd St., Los Angeles, that specializes in buttons.
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