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ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2003 | AL MARTINEZ
Erma Washington is a soft-spoken, almost whispery woman who works as a volunteer at the Altadena Library, a small stucco building situated between the city's business and residential areas. She checks books in and out and puts returned books in their proper places on the shelves that line the room. The library is her sanctuary, her dedication, and in some ways a reminder of the person she once was. For most of her adult life, 60-year-old Erma Washington couldn't read.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
January 23, 2011 | By Craig Fehrman
Every so often, a journalist or a critic or even a novelist will lament the fact that we don't have a truly great Washington novel. Instead, we settle for variety: the historical prototype (Henry Adams' "Democracy"), the chronicle of the "other" Washington (George Pelecanos' D.C. Quartet), the partial qualifier (Jonathan Franzen's "Freedom") and the low-brow media sensation (Joe Klein's "Primary Colors"). The biggest reason Klein's novel became a sensation, of course, was that he published it anonymously.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1992
Thank God Springsteen released this set of albums. There hasn't been a good flood of Robert Hilburn-bashing letters in months. I'm sure the Calendar Letters page will be worth reading for the next year or so. Long live the Boss. Long live Hilburn. JOHN WICKHAM Los Angeles
BUSINESS
November 9, 2009 | Morgen Witzel
What distinguishes truly innovative businesses? Over the years, we have been told that innovative companies master the art of knowledge management; focus on their core competencies; get close to and listen to customers; have a long-term strategy for innovation and invest in the future; or are superior in identifying disruptive technologies. Now, in "The Design of Business: Why Design Thinking Is the Next Competitive Advantage" comes a new idea, or what purports to be one. Roger L. Martin, dean of the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto, argues that the key to success is design, or what he calls "design thinking."
BOOKS
May 20, 1990 | Jeff Danziger
" . . . his findings and recollections are well worth reading. His style is spare and sharp. Mercifully, he avoids finding great lessons where there are none."
OPINION
July 3, 2005
The "Editorials Elsewhere" can be junked. The snippets are not worth reading, especially when they have nothing to do with Los Angeles or California matters. You can use the space for more important items. Carl Olson Woodland Hills
NEWS
June 7, 2001
Regarding "Dickinson May Have Had Bipolar Traits" (May 16): John F. McDermott speculates that Emily Dickinson (arguably America's greatest poet) "had a bipolar trait" and that "along with that came a new kind of thinking." To consider such a thing, one would have to pre-assume that creativity and imagination are the result of some other cause. They are not. It is possible to create something that is pure imagination just as it is possible to be kind and honest for no reason other than kindness and honesty.
OPINION
August 12, 2008
Re "An era ends in silence," Column, Aug. 9 Tim Rutten, whose columns are almost always worth reading, cites Mickey Kaus, who is almost never worth reading, to assert that the failure of the media to follow up on the National Enquirer story about John Edwards' affair demonstrates that the media have a double standard favoring Democrats. The charge of a double standard "is largely true, as anyone who recalls the media frenzy over conservative commentator and former Cabinet secretary William Bennett's high-stakes gambling would agree," Rutten writes.
OPINION
May 19, 2006
Re "A hot paper muzzles academia," Current, May 14 Eve Fairbanks claims that Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government was "nervous to be associated" with Stephen Walt and John Mearsheimer's "Israel Lobby" paper, and she suggests that this nervousness came from the anticipated loss of donations. A more accurate explanation could be the paper's poor scholarship. Mearsheimer conceded that the paper contains no original documentation and that the authors did not conduct any independent interviews.
BOOKS
October 27, 1985 | Allan Boyer, Boyer is an English professor based in Oklahoma.
"He would suddenly be playing soccer with a soft hadrak under the blooming cherry trees of his hometown. . . . Or chewing his dinner, he would dream that he was trying to pawn the violin expropriated from La Belle Epoque to his old music teacher, who now appraised large radios at Cash in a Flash downtown, while outside, Russian tanks, looking like miserable little electric shavers in the vast scale of the skyscraper canyon, rolled through skid row."
OPINION
August 12, 2008
Re "An era ends in silence," Column, Aug. 9 Tim Rutten, whose columns are almost always worth reading, cites Mickey Kaus, who is almost never worth reading, to assert that the failure of the media to follow up on the National Enquirer story about John Edwards' affair demonstrates that the media have a double standard favoring Democrats. The charge of a double standard "is largely true, as anyone who recalls the media frenzy over conservative commentator and former Cabinet secretary William Bennett's high-stakes gambling would agree," Rutten writes.
OPINION
May 19, 2006
Re "A hot paper muzzles academia," Current, May 14 Eve Fairbanks claims that Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government was "nervous to be associated" with Stephen Walt and John Mearsheimer's "Israel Lobby" paper, and she suggests that this nervousness came from the anticipated loss of donations. A more accurate explanation could be the paper's poor scholarship. Mearsheimer conceded that the paper contains no original documentation and that the authors did not conduct any independent interviews.
MAGAZINE
November 13, 2005 | Alan Rifkin, Alan Rifkin is the author of "Signal Hill: Stories" (City Lights Books), a collection of short stories and a novella.
The vision comes and goes. You can still picture, if only barely, Evelyn Waugh arriving back when not everything here had been named yet, and seeing the double meanings laid so bare--oasis and dust, paradise and exile--that he finished a novel in 10 weeks ("The Loved One," his sendup of an immortality-crazed mortuary) after it had taken him three years to write the one before. Of course the ironies have gotten a bit gentrified since then.
OPINION
July 3, 2005
The "Editorials Elsewhere" can be junked. The snippets are not worth reading, especially when they have nothing to do with Los Angeles or California matters. You can use the space for more important items. Carl Olson Woodland Hills
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2004 | Patrick T. Reardon, Chicago Tribune
Nineteen months ago, when historian Philip Zelikow was named executive director of the 9/11 commission, his goal was to produce an authoritative report so clearly written that any American could understand it -- and would want to read it. "It's a report, above all, to the American people. It should be readable," Zelikow says. "In a way, having material like this was both horrifying and a precious opportunity. This is a very important story in American history.
OPINION
June 23, 2003
The children's book "The Adventures of Isabel" is out of print, but the rollicking silliness of Ogden Nash's polysyllabic rhyme still delights any youngster lucky enough to hear or read the emboldening tale about a little girl who coolly defeats monsters and bad dreams. "The bear was hungry, the bear was ravenous, The bear's big mouth was cruel and cavernous." Preschoolers are too young to know the meaning of those big words, but they do some pretty good guessing from context.
OPINION
March 18, 2003
Re " "They Don't Speak for Me' " and "A Celebrity, but First a Citizen," Commentary, March 17: The contrast could not be clearer. Esra Naama speaks simply and provides in chilling detail descriptions of the brutality of the Hussein regime and expresses her desire to see her friends and relatives still in Iraq liberated from a madman. Martin Sheen, on the other hand, offers empty cliches and the message that he and his celebrity friends are being victimized because of their antiwar stance, but says nothing of substance.
OPINION
June 23, 2003
The children's book "The Adventures of Isabel" is out of print, but the rollicking silliness of Ogden Nash's polysyllabic rhyme still delights any youngster lucky enough to hear or read the emboldening tale about a little girl who coolly defeats monsters and bad dreams. "The bear was hungry, the bear was ravenous, The bear's big mouth was cruel and cavernous." Preschoolers are too young to know the meaning of those big words, but they do some pretty good guessing from context.
OPINION
March 18, 2003
Re " "They Don't Speak for Me' " and "A Celebrity, but First a Citizen," Commentary, March 17: The contrast could not be clearer. Esra Naama speaks simply and provides in chilling detail descriptions of the brutality of the Hussein regime and expresses her desire to see her friends and relatives still in Iraq liberated from a madman. Martin Sheen, on the other hand, offers empty cliches and the message that he and his celebrity friends are being victimized because of their antiwar stance, but says nothing of substance.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2003 | AL MARTINEZ
Erma Washington is a soft-spoken, almost whispery woman who works as a volunteer at the Altadena Library, a small stucco building situated between the city's business and residential areas. She checks books in and out and puts returned books in their proper places on the shelves that line the room. The library is her sanctuary, her dedication, and in some ways a reminder of the person she once was. For most of her adult life, 60-year-old Erma Washington couldn't read.
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