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Wrinkles

SPORTS
September 7, 2009 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, ON COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Forget most of what you read, learned, recorded or thought so far about the 2009 season. As usual, it was just people guessing, fudging, lying and/or trying to sell magazines, newspapers, pop-up ads and/or radio advertisement or billboard space in South Bend, Ind. "Best Wishes to Charlie Weis in the 5th year of his college coaching internship. -- Linebacker Alumni." Wait until that wise-guy Weis gets a load of this. Final score: Notre Dame 35, Nevada 0. They say the biggest improvement in college football comes between weeks one and two. Let's hope that includes reporters, ESPN talking heads, coaches, cab drivers and South Bend's merry pranksters.
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IMAGE
August 27, 2009 | Stacie Stukin, Special to The Times
YOU MULTI-TASK all day -- text and drive, talk and type, drink water infused with vitamins. So why shouldn't your makeup do double-duty too? A new generation of foundations aims to do just that, promising more than an even skin tone and a dewy finish. Fortified with ingredients usually reserved for skin care products, these foundations say they can diminish fine lines and wrinkles, treat acne, firm the skin -- even help reverse aging. Some, including Peter Thomas Roth's new Un-Wrinkle Pressed Powder, contain a cocktail of active ingredients, including antioxidants and a synthetic version of snake venom that's actually called SNY-AKE (it claims a Botox-like effect, reducing wrinkles by inhibiting muscle movement)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2009 | Jon Caramanica
On "The Bachelor" and "The Bachelorette," the hotel room that serves as the locale for a sleepover date late in the competition is called the fantasy suite for a reason, but not the obvious one. Sure, it's sensuous, in a romance novel way -- candles, rose petals, high-thread-count sheets -- but the idea of fantasy has as much to do with the viewer's imagination about what might be happening behind those closed doors as with the level of intimacy actually achieved.
NEWS
July 19, 2009 | Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Hard-hit last fall by the economy, cosmetic surgery has been making something of a comeback lately. The most popular procedures are (relatively) low-cost, noninvasive and have the added benefit of reduced recovery times that won't keep patients away from work so long that their jobs are on the line. Though the popularity of procedures varies by age, what follows are definitions for some of the most common cosmetic surgery treatments: Botox The No. 1 noninvasive procedure for patients 30 and older, Botox is a botulinum toxin that is injected into wrinkles, lines and creases in the face or neck to reduce their appearance.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2009
"A Wrinkle in Time" Madeleine L'Engle Meg is a girl having a hard time in school and in her life. One stormy night, Meg meets Mrs. Whatsit. Mrs. Whatsit and two other witches guide Meg, Charles and Calvin on a journey to save her family. She needs to save her father and her brother from IT and in doing so, she discovers how special she is. Meg's gift for saving her father is in her anger and her gift for saving her brother is simply in herself. Does Meg succeed?
IMAGE
May 3, 2009 | Alexandra Drosu
Maybe we can blame snakes for our wrinkles. After all, as the story goes, it was a snake that tempted Eve, getting her expelled from Eden and doomed to a mortal life filled with fine lines and wrinkles. So isn't it about time that the slithering serpent made amends? More than a half-dozen skin-care companies think so, incorporating a synthetic venom into their formulations to help diminish signs of aging. The products sprang from an "aha!"
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2009 | Richard Rushfield
The children of "American Idol's" eighth season experienced their first taste of entertainment mortality Wednesday night after a rare double elimination, which brought to an end the "Idol" careers of Jasmine Murray and Jorge Nunez. The two were eliminated in an episode that featured the unveiling of a new rule in the "Idol" competition, granting the judges veto power over any elimination. As explained by host Ryan Seacrest, the judges will have a "save" option that they may exercise once for each contestant, if the judges unanimously agree that a singer deserves another chance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2009 | Richard Marosi
Smuggler's Gulch lived up to its infamous name. For a century, the narrow canyon leading into California from Mexico provided cover for cattle thieves and opium dealers, bandits and booze runners. More recently, it has hidden thousands of illegal immigrants on their journey north, sealing its place in border lore. Now, it's a fading memory.
IMAGE
January 4, 2009 | Alexandra Drosu
Time and money -- those ever-scarcer commodities -- can make it challenging to take advantage of the beauty advances available in a dermatologist's office. But increasingly, companies are manufacturing at-home devices inspired by treatments previously available only from doctors.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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