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Wristbands

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NEWS
November 15, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times
Breast cancer wristbands usually raise awareness, not trouble. But that’s what happened when two Pennsylvania middle school girls wore theirs to school on Breast Cancer Awareness Day last month. The Allentown Morning Call reports the slogans on the bands – "I (heart) Boobies" on one side and "Keep a Breast" on the other – got the girls suspended for a day and banned from school dances for a month. The girls wore the bracelets, which were later banned by the school, in memory of women they knew who had died from the disease.
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HEALTH
September 6, 2013 | By Ken Kwok
The Fitbit Flex Wireless Activity and Sleep Wristband is one of the latest entries in the growing field of wearable fitness tracking devices. The wristband, arriving on the heels of the Jawbone Up and the Nike Fuelband but priced lower at $99.95, is a cool little gadget that, like the others, motivates you to up your activity game. Unlike its predecessor, the Fitbit One, the Flex is a minimalist silicone bracelet that comes in small or large, black or slate, to be worn 24/7 so you're always on the hook.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2010 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
The organizers of a massive free clinic scheduled to return to Los Angeles later this month announced Monday that they will distribute color-coded wristbands in advance of their opening at the Los Angeles Sports Arena, a change they hope will reduce patient lines. "This way, people can come on their designated day and not worry about long lines just to get in. The wristband is the ticket into the clinic," said Don Manelli, an organizer with Knoxville, Tenn.-based Remote Area Medical, the nonprofit sponsoring the clinic.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
As the nation is glued to the coverage of the recent bombing in Boston and the explosion at a Texas fertilizer  plant, music lovers filing into the Polo Grounds are ready to enjoy three packed days of nonstop music - but they are walking with a bit more American pride. At an ID check near the mainstage - that's where festivalgoers get wristbands to buy alcohol - a worker was clad in a Boston Red Sox jersey. “I flew out here to work the festival and that … happened in between the weekends.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2013 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
A congressman from Massachusetts raised questions Thursday about how Walt Disney Co. will use information it collects when it gives parkgoers new wristbands embedded with computer chips. Edward J. Markey (D-Mass), who co-chairs a congressional panel on privacy, asked Walt Disney Co. Chairman and Chief Executive Robert A. Iger in a letter what information the park will collect with the so-called MagicBand and how it will be used. "Widespread use of MagicBand bracelets by park guests could dramatically increase the personal data Disney can collect about its guests," he said, adding that he is particularly concerned at the prospects of Disney collecting information about children.
SPORTS
August 5, 2011 | Staff and wire reports
Two days after several Ohio State freshmen proudly displayed wristbands supporting deposed football coach Jim Tressel , the university took them away and refunded the players' money. Jerry Emig , a spokesman for the school, said officials were looking into whether players' wearing the wristbands — which carried the initials "JT" — could be an NCAA violation. He added that Ohio State decided to take a cautionary approach after the wristbands, which were sold by an Ohio State employee, were mentioned prominently in media reports.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2010 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
The organizers of a massive free clinic scheduled to return to Los Angeles later this month have announced that color-coded wristbands will be distributed to patients in advance of the weeklong health clinic at the Los Angeles Sports Arena, a change they hope will reduce waits and leave fewer people turned away. "This way, people can come on their designated day and not worry about long lines just to get in. The wristband is the ticket into the clinic," said Don Manelli, an organizer with Knoxville, Tenn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2010 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
Nearly 5,600 people lined up outside the Los Angeles Sports Arena on Sunday, many camping out in the cold on the sidewalk overnight, to claim wristbands and a chance for free dental and medical treatment at a massive health clinic this week. "It's kind of hard to ignore," said organizer Don Manelli. "Somebody waits all night outside to see a dentist — that tells you something." The seven-day clinic, which starts Tuesday, will include vision exams, mammograms and diabetes screening, among other services.
OPINION
November 20, 2010
The wisdom of the 1st Amendment has guided this nation through portentous and contentious debates. It has established judicial boundaries regarding freedom of the press, censorship, desecration of the American flag and expressions of obscenity. Now it is faced with another controversial test of free speech. The question is: Does the Constitution ? boobies? In the five years since the Keep A Breast Foundation began its campaign to make young people aware of breast cancer, it has sold more than 2 million rubber wristbands inscribed with the words: "I ?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2010 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Organizers of a massive free mobile health clinic that opens Tuesday will distribute the remaining wristbands for medical appointments -- about 1,200 -- beginning Wednesday at 10 a.m. The announcement was made after more than a dozen people showed up at the Los Angeles Sports Arena on Monday seeking appointments. Volunteers with Remote Area Medical, the Tennessee-based nonprofit running the free clinic, gave them wristbands and then set a new time for people to make the remaining appointments.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2013 | By Todd Martens, Los Angeles Times
It's April, which is good news for the roughly 180,000 music fans who have tickets to the sold-out Coachella Valley Music & Arts Festival in Indio, set for the weekends of April 12 and April 19. But for those who find themselves shut out of the annual festival in the desert, there are numerous noteworthy concerts happening closer to home. Most even feature modern amenities such as air conditioning, and many, in fact, include artists performing at Coachella. Granted, you won't be seeing 100-plus acts over a three-day span, but for less than the cost of one $349 general admission Coachella wristband, one can undertake a more than worthy pop-music crash course over the next four weeks.
HEALTH
February 11, 2013 | By Mary MacVean, Los Angeles Times
When I was pregnant the second time, I found myself wearing wristbands nonstop that looked like they were meant for athletes but actually were to fend off morning (try all day long) sickness. They were functional but not too attractive. Psi Bands (pronounced "sigh" and referring to pounds per square inch) are acupressure wristbands that bring a little style to nausea relief for people who can't or don't want to take medications. They were designed by two moms and look rather like an inexpensive watch; the pressure applied to the wrists is adjustable.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
A congressman from Massachusetts raised questions Thursday about how the Walt Disney Co. will use information it collects when if offers parkgoers new wristbands embedded with computer chips. Edward J. Markey (D-Mass), co-chairman of a congressional panel on privacy, wrote to Walt Disney Co. Chairman Robert Iger, asking what information the park will collect with the so-called MagicBand and how it will be used. “Widespread use of MagicBand bracelets by park guests could dramatically increase the personal data Disney can collect about its guests,” he said, adding that he is particularly concerned at the prospect of Disney collecting information about children.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2013 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
A congressman from Massachusetts raised questions Thursday about how Walt Disney Co. will use information it collects when it gives parkgoers new wristbands embedded with computer chips. Edward J. Markey (D-Mass), who co-chairs a congressional panel on privacy, asked Walt Disney Co. Chairman and Chief Executive Robert A. Iger in a letter what information the park will collect with the so-called MagicBand and how it will be used. "Widespread use of MagicBand bracelets by park guests could dramatically increase the personal data Disney can collect about its guests," he said, adding that he is particularly concerned at the prospects of Disney collecting information about children.
NEWS
October 22, 2012 | By Karin Klein
Now that Lance Armstrong has been about as thoroughly disgraced as possible, one of the big questions confronting his onetime avid fans is: What should happen to those 80 million or so bright-yellow Livestrong wristbands? It's not as inconsequential a question as it first appears, as I was reminded over the weekend when a Facebook friend posted about his internal struggle over the silicone-gel bracelet that had been resting on the top of his bureau for several days. Though the bracelet was seen in its earliest days as a symbol of support for Armstrong the champion bicyclist and survivor of cancer, it took on greater meaning as more and more people who hadn't touched a bike since childhood bought their own -- and other charities followed the fashion trend with their own rubbery wrist decorations.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2012 | By Shan Li
This post has been corrected, see below. Mattel Inc. is teaming with Wal-Mart Stores Inc. to promote its Monster High dolls line with a message of girl empowerment. Starting July 13, the El Segundo toy giant will place signs in toy aisles of Wal-Mart stores nationwide urging girls to go online to read and watch videos and other material related to self-esteem. Such a campaign is a natural fit with a franchise centered on dolls fashioned as the teenage offspring of famous monsters such as Dracula and Frankenstein, said Lori Pantel, Mattel's vice president of global girls marketing.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
A congressman from Massachusetts raised questions Thursday about how the Walt Disney Co. will use information it collects when if offers parkgoers new wristbands embedded with computer chips. Edward J. Markey (D-Mass), co-chairman of a congressional panel on privacy, wrote to Walt Disney Co. Chairman Robert Iger, asking what information the park will collect with the so-called MagicBand and how it will be used. “Widespread use of MagicBand bracelets by park guests could dramatically increase the personal data Disney can collect about its guests,” he said, adding that he is particularly concerned at the prospect of Disney collecting information about children.
HEALTH
February 11, 2013 | By Mary MacVean, Los Angeles Times
When I was pregnant the second time, I found myself wearing wristbands nonstop that looked like they were meant for athletes but actually were to fend off morning (try all day long) sickness. They were functional but not too attractive. Psi Bands (pronounced "sigh" and referring to pounds per square inch) are acupressure wristbands that bring a little style to nausea relief for people who can't or don't want to take medications. They were designed by two moms and look rather like an inexpensive watch; the pressure applied to the wrists is adjustable.
SPORTS
August 5, 2011 | Staff and wire reports
Two days after several Ohio State freshmen proudly displayed wristbands supporting deposed football coach Jim Tressel , the university took them away and refunded the players' money. Jerry Emig , a spokesman for the school, said officials were looking into whether players' wearing the wristbands — which carried the initials "JT" — could be an NCAA violation. He added that Ohio State decided to take a cautionary approach after the wristbands, which were sold by an Ohio State employee, were mentioned prominently in media reports.
OPINION
November 20, 2010
The wisdom of the 1st Amendment has guided this nation through portentous and contentious debates. It has established judicial boundaries regarding freedom of the press, censorship, desecration of the American flag and expressions of obscenity. Now it is faced with another controversial test of free speech. The question is: Does the Constitution ? boobies? In the five years since the Keep A Breast Foundation began its campaign to make young people aware of breast cancer, it has sold more than 2 million rubber wristbands inscribed with the words: "I ?
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