Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsWriters
IN THE NEWS

Writers

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
October 23, 1998 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Olympic sprint champion Florence Griffith Joyner died after suffering an epileptic seizure, according to autopsy results released Thursday, and her family and friends say they hope the findings will put to rest rumors that drug use contributed to her death. Griffith Joyner died last month in her sleep at age 38. Her husband, Al Joyner, bitterly criticized those who suggested that she took performance-enhancing drugs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2014 | By Hillel Italie
Mary Cheever, an accomplished author and poet best known as the enduring spouse and widow of John Cheever, has died, after surviving by decades a husband who used their lonely but lasting marriage as an inspiration for some of his most memorable stories. She was 95. She had been battling pneumonia and died Monday night at her colonial-style manor in Ossining, N.Y., her daughter, Susan Cheever , said. The home served as a well-publicized backdrop to John Cheever's facade as the gentleman scribe of "The Swimmer" and "The Five-Forty-Eight.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2008 | Marc Weingarten, Special to The Times
Craig Johnson comes as advertised. Standing outside the Autry National Center on a boiling summer afternoon, the Wyoming-based crime novelist is decked out in a long-sleeve shirt made of heavy cotton, scuffed brown boots and a 10-gallon hat that provides shade, but not nearly enough. Spotting his interlocutor, Johnson sticks out his hand and delivers a booming "How ya doin'?!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | By Hillel Italie
Peter Matthiessen, a rich man's son who rejected a life of ease in favor of physical and spiritual challenges and produced such acclaimed works as "The Snow Leopard" and "At Play in the Fields of the Lord," died Saturday. He was 86. His publisher Geoff Kloske of Riverhead Books said Matthiessen, who had been diagnosed with leukemia, was ill "for some months. " He died at a hospital near his home on Long Island in New York. Matthiessen helped found the Paris Review, one of the most influential literary magazines, and won National Book Awards for "The Snow Leopard," his spiritual account of the Himalayas, and for "Shadow Country.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1991 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
Michael Verhoeven's film "The Nasty Girl" is Germany's entry in the foreign-language category in this year's Academy Awards. It is an occasionally surrealistic and often very funny account of a teen-aged Fraulein's distinctly unfunny and dangerous attempts to investigate the Nazi years in her hometown.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
The naughty writers have struck back. Yesterday, Jacket Copy's Carolyn Kellogg reported on Amazon, Kobo and other e-book retailers' cracking down on self-published erotica on their websites, attempting to remove titles of works that depict incest, rape and child pornography. Now, as Publishers Weekly reports , some self-published writers have launched a petition in protest, arguing that the broom retailers are using to sweep out the most offensive of these e-books is catching too many otherwise inoffensive works of erotica.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2013 | By Yvonne Villarreal
They gave us a slow-motion chicken dance, Max Greenfield in a fat suit ( numerous times ) and the epic friend/roommate kiss. The “New Girl” writers room has kept busy concocting a steady stream of adorkable and nutty storylines for the Fox comedy in its short run. Now Sundance Channel is giving viewers a peak at how the funny is made, spotlighting the crew in its latest episode of “The Writers' Room.” The Sundance Channel series has...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Like a lot of writers, I'm well-versed in the art of procrastination. In fact, it often feels like it's getting worse. We live in a culture of constant distraction, of tweets and Facebook status updates, of ephemera as news. With all the data (trivia?) pouring in across the virtual transom, it's a wonder that I, that anyone, can get anything done. At the same time, I want to tell you, procrastination is an important aspect of the writing process - and not just for me. How else to explain the frequency with which Megan McCardle's recent post in the Atlantic, “Why Writers Are the Worst Procrastinators,” has shown up in my Facebook and Twitter feeds?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Joan Didion had it right. In her 1976 essay “Why I Write,” originally published in the New York Times Book Review, she lays out the template in no uncertain terms: “In many ways writing is the act of saying I , of imposing oneself upon other people, of saying listen to me, see it my way, change your mind . It's an aggressive, even a hostile act. You can disguise its qualifiers and tentative subjunctives, with ellipses and evasions -...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Ask and ye shall receive. At least when it comes to authors and Amtrak. Amtrak has launched a still-unstructured writers residency program thanks to an offhanded remark by Alexander Chee and some impassioned pleas on Twitter. In a PEN Ten interview that posted Dec. 23, Chee, author of the forthcoming novel "The Queen of the Night," said that trains are his favorite place to write. He then commented, "I wish Amtrak had residencies for writers. " Not two months later and Amtrak does.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | By David Colker
Lorenzo Semple Jr. was one of the hottest screenwriters in Hollywood in the 1970s and '80s, working on star-studded films such as "Papillon," with Steve McQueen and Dustin Hoffman; "Three Days of the Condor," headlined by Robert Redford; and "Never Say Never Again," Sean Connery's last movie as James Bond. But, rare in the trade, Semple didn't much mind if he was not the sole writer on a film. "Almost all the good scripts I've been involved in, I've been fired off of for one reason or another," he said in a 2011 video interview conducted by the Writers Guild Foundation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2014
Tony Benn Renounced title to stay in House of Commons Tony Benn, 88, a committed British socialist who irritated and fascinated Britons through a political career spanning more than five decades and who renounced his aristocratic title rather than leave the House of Commons, died March 14 at his home in west London, his family said in a statement. No cause was given. Benn held cabinet posts in Labour Party governments in the 1970s and clung unswervingly to his leftist beliefs while his party, in opposition, moved to the center and reemerged to take power again as New Labour.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
Even the ubiquitous James Franco should have known better than to star in "Maladies," a pretentious head-scratcher involving would-be artistic expression, mental illness and shaving cream (don't ask). Franco brings a bit of his trademark charisma to the muddled role of an unstable soap-opera-actor-turned-novelist, also named James, who finds himself in a Long Island beach house living "an artistic life" with his moody, cross-dressing painter friend (Catherine Keener) and his disturbed sister (Fallon Goodson)
HEALTH
March 14, 2014 | By Emily Dwass
Television producer and writer Jason Katims is known for tackling emotional stories. Even his new NBC comedy, "About a Boy," deals with bullying and depression. But family challenges are most apparent in his dramas, especially "Parenthood," finishing its fifth season on NBC, for which Katims sometimes draws on his own experiences. On "Parenthood," the character Max Braverman (played by Max Burkholder) is a child struggling with the autism spectrum disorder Asperger's syndrome. As the father of a son with this developmental disorder, what has it been like to tell that story?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Inkoo Kang
There's plenty of blood in the supernatural horror flick "Dark House," but what really defines director Victor Salva's latest effort is flop sweat. A haunted house, psychic powers, a father-son mystery, pregnancy terror, the South's history of lynching - Salva and co-writer Charles Agron reach for pretty much any contrivance that might send a fleeting shiver down audience members' spines with too little consideration for narrative cohesion or thematic nuance. Upon his mother's death, clairvoyant Nick (Luke Kleintank)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Susan King
Director Roger Michell and writer Hanif Kureishi were on a worldwide promotional tour for "Venus," the 2006 film that earned Peter O'Toole his last Oscar nomination, when the two collaborators' seemingly nonstop travel schedule hatched the concept for a new film. "We had lots of airplane flights and came up with this idea of a couple going to Paris for 48 hours as a very easy and beautiful structure," Michell said. He and Kureishi decided to take their own 48-hour trip to Paris to outline the characters and the plot.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2012 | By Matt Donnelly
Every writer needs inspiration, and while Mindy Kaling's Twitter account might suggest she's never without quips, she shared with the Ministry one of her biggest muses: Rihanna. As co-creator of Fox's "The Mindy Project," the actress and author said that RiRi often gets staff juices flowing because of her broad appeal. "Rihanna is a big favorite," Kaling said on Saturday at West Hollywood's Mondrian hotel, where a reception was held ahead of the show's fall premiere, "whatever the reason the guys on my staff can get behind it. They think she's just super hot and intimidating.
NEWS
May 11, 2012 | By Mark D. Shermis
Editorial writers are entitled to their opinions. But Karin Klein's May 6 piece on automated essay scoring simply misses the point. She questions the value of automated essay scoring software (AES) as a teaching supplement in the area of writing, based in part on her own daughter's experience. It is unfortunate that her singular personal experience was frustrating for mother and daughter, but it should not be used to censure an evolving technology that can, indeed, produce better writers.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film critic
"Le Week-End" is a sour and misanthropic film masquerading as an honest and sensitive romance. A painful and unremittingly bleak look at a difficult marriage, it wants us to sit through a range of domestic horrors without offering much of anything as a reward. This is especially disheartening because on an abstract level the film's participants on both sides of the camera are talented individuals with strong resumes. Jim Broadbent and Lindsay Duncan, who star as the unhappy couple, are two of Britain's top actors.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By John Horn
MEXICO CITY - A lot of people think they know what the real story of the movie "Noah" should be. They are likely some of the same people who think they know what the real story of the man Noah is. Darren Aronofsky, the director of the new movie about the man and the great flood, is ready to rain on what he believes is their misinformed parade. "Noah has been turned into a nursery school story," said the director and co-writer of "Noah," which had its world premiere in Mexico City on Monday night.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|