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ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013 | By Scott Martelle
We have, when you think about it, always been an argumentative culture and society, even before we became a country. And we've been arguing ever since, for better or worse, and with varying degrees of skill. The nature of argument was part of the focus of the "American Arguments" panel at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books on Saturday moderated by L.A. Times editor-at-large Jim Newton, which drew together four history authors whose books explore some of the key formative arguments of American history.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2013 | Times staff and wire reports
Mary Thom, an early staffer at Ms. magazine who rose to executive editor and later wrote an insider's history of the groundbreaking, mass-market chronicle of the women's movement, died Friday in a motorcycle crash in Yonkers, N.Y. She was 68. Her death was announced by the Women's Media Center, a nonprofit New York-based organization founded in 2005 by Jane Fonda, Robin Morgan and Ms. co-founder Gloria Steinem. Thom was editor-in-chief for the center, which publishes features on women's issues in addition to offering media training and advocacy.
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OPINION
September 8, 2012
Re "Race to unearth a royal mystery," Column One, Sept. 5 At last, we may have some truth about Richard III, who has been maligned for centuries. Let's remember that history is written by the victors - in this case, the Tudors - after Henry VII, whose claim was very tenuous, gained the throne. No one really knows what happened to the little princes in the tower. We do know that their succession to the throne was not valid when it was discovered that Edward IV's wife, Elizabeth Woodville, had been betrothed before marrying Edward, and therefore their marriage and thus their children were not legitimate.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
In her long and illustrious career, Jamaica Kincaid has tackled many genres of literature. So best believe her when she says that her 2013 work "See Now Then" is a novel and a work of fiction. Period. That's why, she said in a discussion with Hector Tobar on Sunday at the Festival of Books, "the most irritating thing" about the reaction to the book has been the insinuation that it is really a roman-a-clef, a memoir disguised as a fiction. "I will assert that if I were a white man this would not be the conversation," Kincaid told the audience at the Embassy Room Auditorium, who responded with a round of applause.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1994 | CHRISTINA LIMA
Four years ago, Powell Greenland thought life was a bit boring. So the Port Hueneme retiree embarked on a journey to discover what events helped to shape the tiny city of Port Hueneme. He spent hours running from library to library. He read hundreds of newspapers clips and interviewed scores of residents.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2010 | By Randy Lewis
History, it's often been observed, is written by victors, which might explain why an especially compelling chapter of the Mexican-American War remains so infrequently told, at least in the U.S. The chapter in question is about the San Patricios, a company of Irish immigrants pressed into service by the U.S. Army. Ideologically opposed to the fight, they switched sides, choosing to stand alongside the Mexican military rather than the forces of their newly adopted homeland. When the conflict ended, the members of the battalion were executed for their desertion.
NEWS
February 20, 1991 | From Associated Press
Looking over the shoulder of Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf, commander of allied forces in the Gulf War, is an army colonel who will have a large say in how history views this conflict. The war is just a month old, but Col. Richard Swain, Ph.D., director of the Combat Studies Institute of the Command and General Staff College at Ft. Leavenworth, Kan., already is attending briefings, interviewing the major players, collecting documents and making observations on the conduct of the war.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2006 | From the Associated Press
He gave the world the Ministry of Silly Walks and foul-tempered hotelier Basil Fawlty of TV's "Fawlty Towers." Now John Cleese wants to pass his comic skills on to a new generation. Cleese, one of the founders of the comedy troupe Monty Python's Flying Circus, said he planned to write a history of stage, film and TV comedy, from silent screen classics to the workplace sitcom "The Office." "I'm too old to write new comedy," Cleese, 66, was quoted as saying Monday by London's Times newspaper.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
In her long and illustrious career, Jamaica Kincaid has tackled many genres of literature. So best believe her when she says that her 2013 work "See Now Then" is a novel and a work of fiction. Period. That's why, she said in a discussion with Hector Tobar on Sunday at the Festival of Books, "the most irritating thing" about the reaction to the book has been the insinuation that it is really a roman-a-clef, a memoir disguised as a fiction. "I will assert that if I were a white man this would not be the conversation," Kincaid told the audience at the Embassy Room Auditorium, who responded with a round of applause.
NEWS
May 17, 1994 | JIM WASHBURN
One of my lingering fears in this job--aside from the thought of ever having to share a bed with 25 ventriloquist dummies again--is that someone might really put me on sometime. There I'd be, nodding earnestly as a Fixations subject was going on about his collection of toast--"Now, look at all the raisins in this 1923 slice!"--or devotion to Freddie Prinze, and the whole time he'd be making it up on the spot and laughing up his sleeve.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013 | By Scott Martelle
We have, when you think about it, always been an argumentative culture and society, even before we became a country. And we've been arguing ever since, for better or worse, and with varying degrees of skill. The nature of argument was part of the focus of the "American Arguments" panel at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books on Saturday moderated by L.A. Times editor-at-large Jim Newton, which drew together four history authors whose books explore some of the key formative arguments of American history.
OPINION
September 8, 2012
Re "Race to unearth a royal mystery," Column One, Sept. 5 At last, we may have some truth about Richard III, who has been maligned for centuries. Let's remember that history is written by the victors - in this case, the Tudors - after Henry VII, whose claim was very tenuous, gained the throne. No one really knows what happened to the little princes in the tower. We do know that their succession to the throne was not valid when it was discovered that Edward IV's wife, Elizabeth Woodville, had been betrothed before marrying Edward, and therefore their marriage and thus their children were not legitimate.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2011 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
There's a not-so-subtle agenda underpinning Joe McGinniss' "The Rogue: Searching for the Real Sarah Palin," although it's never made explicit until late in the book. "The time has come to strike the tent," McGinniss begins the closing chapter. "[N]o matter how much my book sales might benefit from a Palin presidential campaign in 2012, I sincerely hope that the whole extravaganza, which has been unblushingly underwritten by a mainstream media willing to gamble the nation's future in exchange for the cheap thrill of watching a clown in high heels on a flying trapeze, is nearing the end of its run. " If you're a Palin supporter, this will only give you ammunition to dismiss "The Rogue" as one more piece of liberal propaganda, yet another "lamestream media" smear campaign.
SPORTS
April 11, 2011 | Jerry Crowe
It started with a stopwatch. Peter Daland, USC's championship-winning former swim coach, was only 8 years old when his parents gave him the timepiece as a gift, but immediately he grasped the possibilities. "I went up to the pool," he says, "and I told the other kids, 'Let's have a workout.' I didn't even know what a workout was. " That day, Daland later realized, a coach was born. In time, Daland would make his mark not at that tiny community pool in Philadelphia but at USC, where from 1958 to 1992 his star-studded teams won nine NCAA championships and produced scores of All-Americans and Olympic medalists.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2010 | By Randy Lewis
History, it's often been observed, is written by victors, which might explain why an especially compelling chapter of the Mexican-American War remains so infrequently told, at least in the U.S. The chapter in question is about the San Patricios, a company of Irish immigrants pressed into service by the U.S. Army. Ideologically opposed to the fight, they switched sides, choosing to stand alongside the Mexican military rather than the forces of their newly adopted homeland. When the conflict ended, the members of the battalion were executed for their desertion.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2009 | Louise Steinman, Steinman, author of "The Souvenir," is at work on "The Crooked Mirror: A Conversation With Poland."
Who Will Write Our History? Rediscovering a Hidden Archive From the Warsaw Ghetto Samuel D. Kassow Vintage: 524 pp., $16.95 paper -- Emanuel Ringelblum was an inveterate optimist who, in 1930s Warsaw, believed that Polish Jewry had a future. Neither warnings from colleagues nor pleadings from in-laws persuaded the historian and political activist to leave the country.
SPORTS
August 31, 2008 | Bill Plaschke
Michael Phelps returned from Beijing to a Magic Kingdom, a Disneyland parade in a red convertible with Mickey Mouse at his side and America at his feet. Jason Lezak flew home in coach. "I tried to upgrade, but everything in business was taken," he said. "At least I still got my aisle seat." Michael Phelps returned from Beijing to a magic carpet ride, an "Entourage" cameo followed by a "Saturday Night Live" gig followed by a $1.6-million book deal. Jason Lezak changed planes in San Francisco, and still couldn't get bumped up from coach.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2009 | Louise Steinman, Steinman, author of "The Souvenir," is at work on "The Crooked Mirror: A Conversation With Poland."
Who Will Write Our History? Rediscovering a Hidden Archive From the Warsaw Ghetto Samuel D. Kassow Vintage: 524 pp., $16.95 paper -- Emanuel Ringelblum was an inveterate optimist who, in 1930s Warsaw, believed that Polish Jewry had a future. Neither warnings from colleagues nor pleadings from in-laws persuaded the historian and political activist to leave the country.
SPORTS
August 31, 2008 | Bill Plaschke
Michael Phelps returned from Beijing to a Magic Kingdom, a Disneyland parade in a red convertible with Mickey Mouse at his side and America at his feet. Jason Lezak flew home in coach. "I tried to upgrade, but everything in business was taken," he said. "At least I still got my aisle seat." Michael Phelps returned from Beijing to a magic carpet ride, an "Entourage" cameo followed by a "Saturday Night Live" gig followed by a $1.6-million book deal. Jason Lezak changed planes in San Francisco, and still couldn't get bumped up from coach.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2006 | From the Associated Press
He gave the world the Ministry of Silly Walks and foul-tempered hotelier Basil Fawlty of TV's "Fawlty Towers." Now John Cleese wants to pass his comic skills on to a new generation. Cleese, one of the founders of the comedy troupe Monty Python's Flying Circus, said he planned to write a history of stage, film and TV comedy, from silent screen classics to the workplace sitcom "The Office." "I'm too old to write new comedy," Cleese, 66, was quoted as saying Monday by London's Times newspaper.
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