Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsWriting History
IN THE NEWS

Writing History

NEWS
October 1, 2012 | By Liesl Bradner
With millions of books sold worldwide, historian, Pulitzer Prize-winner and bestselling author Robert K. Massie has devoted the majority of his career to studying the House of Romanov, Russia's royal family from 1613 to 1917. He will be lecturing on the craft of writing history Monday night at Claremont McKenna College in Claremont. Massie, author of  “Catherine the Great: Portrait of a Woman,” now available in paperback, became an expert on the imperial family beginning with "Nicholas and Alexandra.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 13, 1987
A memorial service for longtime Artesia resident and historian Albert O. Little will be held today at 1 p.m. at the Artesia Community Center, 18750 Clarkdale Ave. Little, who was known to many residents as "Mr. Artesia," died Tuesday at Pioneer Hospital. He was 87. The center was renamed the Albert O. Little Community Center on Aug. 10. Today's ceremony had been originally planned to be a rededication ceremony, City Manager Eugene Romig said.
BOOKS
April 21, 2002 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
Question: What interests you about writing history? Answer: I'm interested in telling stories, in capturing those moments when the internal imagined experience intersects with social reality. Individual lives give this experience context. I have to be adept at telling the tale and using the factual record. I have to be particularly choosy about which facts I get to keep. Q: What aspect of California history interests you most?
NEWS
November 25, 1990 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, the abandoned Uniroyal tire plant alongside the Santa Ana Freeway was a shabby monument to an era when a rapidly growing Los Angeles attracted the nation's major tire producers. The plant was boarded up in 1978 after tires were manufactured there for nearly half a century. Its windows were broken and its facade was dingy from exposure to years of freeway exhaust fumes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ed Turner, 66, who helped establish CNN as a respected major news organization, died Saturday of liver cancer in George Washington University Hospital in Washington, D.C. Turner was hired in 1980 as one of the first news professionals brought into the fledgling network. The fact that he coincidentally shared the last name of CNN founder Ted Turner earned him the nickname "No Relation" Turner, which he had printed on matchbooks he distributed from his office.
NEWS
December 29, 1985 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
Just about everything that has happened in tiny Sierra County in Northern California since its discovery in 1849 is recorded in James J. Sinnott's six-volume history. If you ever lived in the sparsely populated, isolated, mountainous county, chances are you are mentioned in Sinnott's historical series, which probably is the most comprehensive history of any California county.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2011 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Harry Potter didn't even wait until the sun rose to start vanquishing box-office records. The last big-screen adventure of the boy wizard, "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows — Part 2," raked in $42.5 million at midnight screenings in the U.S. and Canada, according to Warner Bros. The previous record was about $30 million, set in 2009 by "The Twilight Saga: New Moon. " Fans eager to see Harry's final battle with the evil Lord Voldemort began lining up early Thursday for the shows.
NEWS
March 10, 1999 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stefan Hatos, co-creator, writer and producer of the durable game show "Let's Make a Deal," has died at the age of 78. Hatos, who produced a variety of other television shows and had a long history in radio, died March 2 in a Toluca Lake health club of heart problems. He had homes in Beverly Hills and Pebble Beach, Calif. With Monty Hall, who was the show's on-air host for about 4,500 episodes, Hatos created the popular "Let's Make a Deal" for daytime television in 1963.
NEWS
January 30, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
A new education group chaired by former New Jersey Gov. Thomas H. Kean today proposed a mandatory national achievement test for all high school seniors attending public and private schools. Educate America, based in Morristown, N.J., made the national exam proposal its first initiative in a campaign to "drive the education policy agenda for the 1990s." Kean, now president of Drew University in Madison, N.J.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|