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BOOKS
September 15, 1985
I am a former member of the 15th Hospital Center, a World War II Army medical unit that trained at Camp Barkeley, Tex., and served in the Zone of Interior at Cirencester, England, during 1944-45. I am writing a history of the old Army unit and am attempting to contact as many of our former members, or their survivors, as I possibly can. Many of my addresses are 40 years old. Four of our group came from the Los Angeles area: Leo Block, Merle E. Blough, Charles N. Morris and the late Glenn V. Woodward.
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NEWS
September 13, 1987
A memorial service for longtime Artesia resident and historian Albert O. Little will be held today at 1 p.m. at the Artesia Community Center, 18750 Clarkdale Ave. Little, who was known to many residents as "Mr. Artesia," died Tuesday at Pioneer Hospital. He was 87. The center was renamed the Albert O. Little Community Center on Aug. 10. Today's ceremony had been originally planned to be a rededication ceremony, City Manager Eugene Romig said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ed Turner, 66, who helped establish CNN as a respected major news organization, died Saturday of liver cancer in George Washington University Hospital in Washington, D.C. Turner was hired in 1980 as one of the first news professionals brought into the fledgling network. The fact that he coincidentally shared the last name of CNN founder Ted Turner earned him the nickname "No Relation" Turner, which he had printed on matchbooks he distributed from his office.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2011 | James Rainey
The Mississippi fairly glides through this old cotton country, nothing if not strong and serene. But look a little closer at the big river and you'll notice an upwelling here and a dark eddy there. Something powerful, it appears, lurks beneath the surface. In this hollowed-out little town of 3,511 people, a newspaperman named Stanley Nelson can be found most days clattering away on a decade-old Mac computer. He moves with a slow and purposeful calm. But he too has been roiling the waters.
BOOKS
June 15, 1986 | Arthur Quinn
"The Cambridge Apostles"--many Americans became aware of this venerable semi-secret society of Cambridge University only during the 1980s, when many of the British elite then being exposed as long-time agents for the Soviet Union were also found to have something else in common: While Cambridge undergraduates, they had been Apostles.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2011 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Harry Potter didn't even wait until the sun rose to start vanquishing box-office records. The last big-screen adventure of the boy wizard, "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows — Part 2," raked in $42.5 million at midnight screenings in the U.S. and Canada, according to Warner Bros. The previous record was about $30 million, set in 2009 by "The Twilight Saga: New Moon. " Fans eager to see Harry's final battle with the evil Lord Voldemort began lining up early Thursday for the shows.
NEWS
March 10, 1999 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stefan Hatos, co-creator, writer and producer of the durable game show "Let's Make a Deal," has died at the age of 78. Hatos, who produced a variety of other television shows and had a long history in radio, died March 2 in a Toluca Lake health club of heart problems. He had homes in Beverly Hills and Pebble Beach, Calif. With Monty Hall, who was the show's on-air host for about 4,500 episodes, Hatos created the popular "Let's Make a Deal" for daytime television in 1963.
NEWS
January 30, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
A new education group chaired by former New Jersey Gov. Thomas H. Kean today proposed a mandatory national achievement test for all high school seniors attending public and private schools. Educate America, based in Morristown, N.J., made the national exam proposal its first initiative in a campaign to "drive the education policy agenda for the 1990s." Kean, now president of Drew University in Madison, N.J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1987 | Marcida Dodson \f7
UC Irvine has won a $1-million contract from the state to conduct a summer training program for junior and senior high school teachers. Two hundred teachers from throughout the state will take part in the four-week Summer Technology Training Institute, designed to integrate technology with English, language arts, history and social science, said Carol Booth Olson, institute director and co-director of UCI's Writing Project.
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