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Writing History

BOOKS
September 15, 1985
I am a former member of the 15th Hospital Center, a World War II Army medical unit that trained at Camp Barkeley, Tex., and served in the Zone of Interior at Cirencester, England, during 1944-45. I am writing a history of the old Army unit and am attempting to contact as many of our former members, or their survivors, as I possibly can. Many of my addresses are 40 years old. Four of our group came from the Los Angeles area: Leo Block, Merle E. Blough, Charles N. Morris and the late Glenn V. Woodward.
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NEWS
October 1, 2012 | By Liesl Bradner
With millions of books sold worldwide, historian, Pulitzer Prize-winner and bestselling author Robert K. Massie has devoted the majority of his career to studying the House of Romanov, Russia's royal family from 1613 to 1917. He will be lecturing on the craft of writing history Monday night at Claremont McKenna College in Claremont. Massie, author of  “Catherine the Great: Portrait of a Woman,” now available in paperback, became an expert on the imperial family beginning with "Nicholas and Alexandra.
NEWS
September 13, 1987
A memorial service for longtime Artesia resident and historian Albert O. Little will be held today at 1 p.m. at the Artesia Community Center, 18750 Clarkdale Ave. Little, who was known to many residents as "Mr. Artesia," died Tuesday at Pioneer Hospital. He was 87. The center was renamed the Albert O. Little Community Center on Aug. 10. Today's ceremony had been originally planned to be a rededication ceremony, City Manager Eugene Romig said.
BOOKS
April 21, 2002 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
Question: What interests you about writing history? Answer: I'm interested in telling stories, in capturing those moments when the internal imagined experience intersects with social reality. Individual lives give this experience context. I have to be adept at telling the tale and using the factual record. I have to be particularly choosy about which facts I get to keep. Q: What aspect of California history interests you most?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ed Turner, 66, who helped establish CNN as a respected major news organization, died Saturday of liver cancer in George Washington University Hospital in Washington, D.C. Turner was hired in 1980 as one of the first news professionals brought into the fledgling network. The fact that he coincidentally shared the last name of CNN founder Ted Turner earned him the nickname "No Relation" Turner, which he had printed on matchbooks he distributed from his office.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2013 | By Mark Schone
History may be written by the victors, but Alexander Hamilton became a victor by writing history. He died at the hands of lifelong rival Aaron Burr in a famous duel, yet posterity has been kinder to Hamilton because of the power of his pen. During his lifetime, Hamilton couldn't stop Burr from eclipsing him politically - Burr became vice president and invented the Democratic Party , while Hamilton's career died with George Washington. But with years of letters impugning Burr's motives and morals, Hamilton was able to sway enough opinions to deny Burr a second term as vice president and the governorship of New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2012 | By Scott Martelle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Watergate A Novel Thomas Mallon Pantheon: 448 pp., $27.95 A few months ago I attended a book launch party for Adam Hochschild's World War I history, "To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914-1918," where he offered a concise dissection of the difference between writing novels and writing history. To write history, he said, the story needs only to be true. To write a novel, the story must be plausible - an often much more difficult thing to accomplish.
OPINION
February 2, 2014 | By Nicholas Meyer
The Italians have a phrase, si non è vero è ben trovato , which roughly translates as, "If it isn't true, it ought to be. " If only the critics who decry the inaccuracies to be found in recent movies could take that attitude. Whether dealing with outer space, the Southern slave trade, Somali pirates or Walt Disney, films have been called out this year for the least deviation from "reality" (a word Nabokov insisted routinely belongs within quotation marks). Unless specified as documentaries, feature films are intended to be viewed as stories.
BOOKS
June 15, 1986 | Arthur Quinn
"The Cambridge Apostles"--many Americans became aware of this venerable semi-secret society of Cambridge University only during the 1980s, when many of the British elite then being exposed as long-time agents for the Soviet Union were also found to have something else in common: While Cambridge undergraduates, they had been Apostles.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2011 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Harry Potter didn't even wait until the sun rose to start vanquishing box-office records. The last big-screen adventure of the boy wizard, "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows — Part 2," raked in $42.5 million at midnight screenings in the U.S. and Canada, according to Warner Bros. The previous record was about $30 million, set in 2009 by "The Twilight Saga: New Moon. " Fans eager to see Harry's final battle with the evil Lord Voldemort began lining up early Thursday for the shows.
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