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Writing History

OPINION
July 7, 2008
Re "Obama to Bush's rescue," July 1 Jonah Goldberg writes of President Bush's policies, "Whatever the merits of those policies, it's unlikely that historians will see them as a radical, right-wing break from the Clinton years. " If he's writing that history, highly unlikely. Goldberg also says he was in the Oval Office with the president during a meeting with a small group of journalists. Doing what? Washing the president's feet? David Hocker South Pasadena -- I greatly enjoy watching Goldberg squirm as he struggles to put a positive face on the unmitigated disaster that is the Bush administration.
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BOOKS
July 16, 1989
Ferol Egan writes in his excellent review of John S. D. Eisenhower's "So Far From God, the U.S. War With Mexico 1846-1848" (Book Review, June 25): "Eisenhower brings his background as a former Army general to bear upon the wide range of battles in this war." Actually, the former President's son, although holding a reserve brigadier general's commission, resigned from active duty in 1963 as a lieutenant colonel. And it was probably his 19 years' background at finally this Regular rank plus his subsequent distinguished civilian military writing career that contributed to this most recent work.
BOOKS
September 15, 1985
I am a former member of the 15th Hospital Center, a World War II Army medical unit that trained at Camp Barkeley, Tex., and served in the Zone of Interior at Cirencester, England, during 1944-45. I am writing a history of the old Army unit and am attempting to contact as many of our former members, or their survivors, as I possibly can. Many of my addresses are 40 years old. Four of our group came from the Los Angeles area: Leo Block, Merle E. Blough, Charles N. Morris and the late Glenn V. Woodward.
NEWS
October 1, 2012 | By Liesl Bradner
With millions of books sold worldwide, historian, Pulitzer Prize-winner and bestselling author Robert K. Massie has devoted the majority of his career to studying the House of Romanov, Russia's royal family from 1613 to 1917. He will be lecturing on the craft of writing history Monday night at Claremont McKenna College in Claremont. Massie, author of  “Catherine the Great: Portrait of a Woman,” now available in paperback, became an expert on the imperial family beginning with "Nicholas and Alexandra.
BOOKS
April 21, 2002 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
Question: What interests you about writing history? Answer: I'm interested in telling stories, in capturing those moments when the internal imagined experience intersects with social reality. Individual lives give this experience context. I have to be adept at telling the tale and using the factual record. I have to be particularly choosy about which facts I get to keep. Q: What aspect of California history interests you most?
MAGAZINE
November 27, 2005 | Matt Bai, Matt Bai is a Washington-based writer for the New York Times Magazine. This essay was adapted from the anthology "I Married My Mother-In-Law," edited by Ilena Silverman, to be published in January. Copyright 2005 by Matt Bai. Reprinted by arrangement with Riverhead Books.
Only as I sat in rush-hour traffic on Interstate 5, on my way to Garden Grove, did it occur to me that I might have conveyed the wrong impression to Ellen's parents. Since I was spending the week in Los Angeles on business, I had called her folks and invited myself down for dinner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ed Turner, 66, who helped establish CNN as a respected major news organization, died Saturday of liver cancer in George Washington University Hospital in Washington, D.C. Turner was hired in 1980 as one of the first news professionals brought into the fledgling network. The fact that he coincidentally shared the last name of CNN founder Ted Turner earned him the nickname "No Relation" Turner, which he had printed on matchbooks he distributed from his office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2006 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
William Diehl, the bestselling author known best for "Sharky's Machine" and "Primal Fear" -- fast-paced thrillers that became hit movies -- died Friday at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta. He was 81. The cause was an aortic aneurysm, said a longtime friend, Don Smith. Diehl was a former journalist and photographer who became a novelist late in life after a dispirited awakening at his 50th birthday party.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2011 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Harry Potter didn't even wait until the sun rose to start vanquishing box-office records. The last big-screen adventure of the boy wizard, "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows — Part 2," raked in $42.5 million at midnight screenings in the U.S. and Canada, according to Warner Bros. The previous record was about $30 million, set in 2009 by "The Twilight Saga: New Moon. " Fans eager to see Harry's final battle with the evil Lord Voldemort began lining up early Thursday for the shows.
NEWS
December 29, 1985 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
Just about everything that has happened in tiny Sierra County in Northern California since its discovery in 1849 is recorded in James J. Sinnott's six-volume history. If you ever lived in the sparsely populated, isolated, mountainous county, chances are you are mentioned in Sinnott's historical series, which probably is the most comprehensive history of any California county.
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