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Writing History

BOOKS
April 21, 2002 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
Question: What interests you about writing history? Answer: I'm interested in telling stories, in capturing those moments when the internal imagined experience intersects with social reality. Individual lives give this experience context. I have to be adept at telling the tale and using the factual record. I have to be particularly choosy about which facts I get to keep. Q: What aspect of California history interests you most?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ed Turner, 66, who helped establish CNN as a respected major news organization, died Saturday of liver cancer in George Washington University Hospital in Washington, D.C. Turner was hired in 1980 as one of the first news professionals brought into the fledgling network. The fact that he coincidentally shared the last name of CNN founder Ted Turner earned him the nickname "No Relation" Turner, which he had printed on matchbooks he distributed from his office.
OPINION
February 1, 2010
Howard Zinn died last week. Since 1980, his controversial "A People's History of the United States" has sold more than 2 million copies, and it has given Zinn -- a professor, social activist, shipyard worker and World War II bombardier -- his own shot at being more than a footnote in the march of time. Marjorie Miller Marjorie Miller interviewed his colleagues to start history's assessment. Sean Wilentz Princeton University, "The Age of Reagan: A History, 1974-2008" What he did was take all of the guys in white hats and put them in black hats, and vice versa.
NEWS
December 29, 1985 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
Just about everything that has happened in tiny Sierra County in Northern California since its discovery in 1849 is recorded in James J. Sinnott's six-volume history. If you ever lived in the sparsely populated, isolated, mountainous county, chances are you are mentioned in Sinnott's historical series, which probably is the most comprehensive history of any California county.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2011 | James Rainey
The Mississippi fairly glides through this old cotton country, nothing if not strong and serene. But look a little closer at the big river and you'll notice an upwelling here and a dark eddy there. Something powerful, it appears, lurks beneath the surface. In this hollowed-out little town of 3,511 people, a newspaperman named Stanley Nelson can be found most days clattering away on a decade-old Mac computer. He moves with a slow and purposeful calm. But he too has been roiling the waters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2006 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
William Diehl, the bestselling author known best for "Sharky's Machine" and "Primal Fear" -- fast-paced thrillers that became hit movies -- died Friday at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta. He was 81. The cause was an aortic aneurysm, said a longtime friend, Don Smith. Diehl was a former journalist and photographer who became a novelist late in life after a dispirited awakening at his 50th birthday party.
MAGAZINE
June 8, 1986 | JACQUES LESLIE, Jacques Leslie, a former Los Angeles Times foreign correspondent, is a writer based in Northern California
That customarily curmudgeonly man of letters, Gore Vidal, asserts on the dust jacket of Vikram Seth's "The Golden Gate" that the book is "the Great California Novel." A New York Times review called the book "a splendid achievement," describing it as "a thoroughly Californian novel, peopled by unmistakably Californian characters." One reviewer, X. J.
BOOKS
June 15, 1986 | Arthur Quinn
"The Cambridge Apostles"--many Americans became aware of this venerable semi-secret society of Cambridge University only during the 1980s, when many of the British elite then being exposed as long-time agents for the Soviet Union were also found to have something else in common: While Cambridge undergraduates, they had been Apostles.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2011 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Harry Potter didn't even wait until the sun rose to start vanquishing box-office records. The last big-screen adventure of the boy wizard, "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows — Part 2," raked in $42.5 million at midnight screenings in the U.S. and Canada, according to Warner Bros. The previous record was about $30 million, set in 2009 by "The Twilight Saga: New Moon. " Fans eager to see Harry's final battle with the evil Lord Voldemort began lining up early Thursday for the shows.
NEWS
March 10, 1999 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stefan Hatos, co-creator, writer and producer of the durable game show "Let's Make a Deal," has died at the age of 78. Hatos, who produced a variety of other television shows and had a long history in radio, died March 2 in a Toluca Lake health club of heart problems. He had homes in Beverly Hills and Pebble Beach, Calif. With Monty Hall, who was the show's on-air host for about 4,500 episodes, Hatos created the popular "Let's Make a Deal" for daytime television in 1963.
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