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Wrong Death Suits

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NEWS
March 13, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A judge has thrown out a wrongful-death lawsuit brought against the Boston Ballet by a woman who claimed her anorexic daughter died because ballet officials pressured her to remain thin. Patricia Harrington filed suit in June after the death of Heidi Guenther. When she died in 1997, the 22-year-old was 5-foot-3 and weighed 93 pounds. Suffolk Superior Court Justice Elizabeth M.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2014 | By Todd Martens
More than a year after the death of Latin music superstar Jenni Rivera, controversy and accusations continue to surround the circumstances of her death. The latest salvo comes from Rivera's husband, former Major League Baseball player Esteban Loaiza, who filed a wrongful-death suit against the owners of the aircraft that crashed with Rivera aboard, the Associated Press reported Friday. Loaiza was separated from Rivera at the time of her death but seeks unspecified damages. The suit, according to the Associated Press, names the  plane's owners, Starwood Management LLC and its parent company, Rodatz Financial Group.  Rivera, a native of Long Beach, and six others, including two pilots, died Dec. 9, 2012, when the private jet carrying them went into a dive, plummeting nose-first 28,000 feet in 30 seconds before hitting the side of a mountain.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1996 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Move over, "Murder One" and "Law & Order." There's another courtroom drama coming to television. E! Entertainment Television today will start featuring reenactments from the O.J. Simpson civil trial, with actors portraying Simpson, his friend Al "A.C." Cowlings and other figures in the murder case. E!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb
After a trial that started in the spring, lasted through the summer and ended in the fall, one that entailed hundreds of exhibits and staggering legal bills, the Michael Jackson wrongful-death lawsuit finally went to the jury Thursday. What the case may come down to is whether jurors think that Jackson is to blame for his own demise by insisting on hiring the doctor who killed him, or that AEG Live executives were such poor witnesses that nothing they said can be believed. Jackson's mother and three children contend that AEG Live negligently hired and supervised Dr. Conrad Murray, the Las Vegas physician who gave the singer a fatal dose of the anesthetic propofol to combat his severe insomnia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2001
Re "Family of Slain Boy Files Suit Against 32 People," Aug. 10: The Markowitzes failed to name the person most responsible for the death of their son Nicholas--their son Benjamin. Had he not been a doper to begin with, this would have never happened. Maybe they hope that hitting the city of Los Angeles Lotto will soothe some of the pain. After all, blood money is still money. Roy Ballesteros Los Angeles
NEWS
May 15, 1986
Raymond and Shirley Ann Nicholson of Duarte, whose son was fatally shot by a sheriff's deputy, have agreed to a $175,000 settlement of their wrongful death lawsuit against Los Angeles County. The five-year-old lawsuit had sought punitive damages for loss of love, affection and the comfort of their son, said the Nicholsons' attorney, Howard Shelton. Raymond Nicholson Jr., then 20, died Oct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb
After a trial that started in the spring, lasted through the summer and ended in the fall, one that entailed hundreds of exhibits and staggering legal bills, the Michael Jackson wrongful-death lawsuit finally went to the jury Thursday. What the case may come down to is whether jurors think that Jackson is to blame for his own demise by insisting on hiring the doctor who killed him, or that AEG Live executives were such poor witnesses that nothing they said can be believed. Jackson's mother and three children contend that AEG Live negligently hired and supervised Dr. Conrad Murray, the Las Vegas physician who gave the singer a fatal dose of the anesthetic propofol to combat his severe insomnia.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2014 | By Todd Martens
More than a year after the death of Latin music superstar Jenni Rivera, controversy and accusations continue to surround the circumstances of her death. The latest salvo comes from Rivera's husband, former Major League Baseball player Esteban Loaiza, who filed a wrongful-death suit against the owners of the aircraft that crashed with Rivera aboard, the Associated Press reported Friday. Loaiza was separated from Rivera at the time of her death but seeks unspecified damages. The suit, according to the Associated Press, names the  plane's owners, Starwood Management LLC and its parent company, Rodatz Financial Group.  Rivera, a native of Long Beach, and six others, including two pilots, died Dec. 9, 2012, when the private jet carrying them went into a dive, plummeting nose-first 28,000 feet in 30 seconds before hitting the side of a mountain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2000 | RICHARD MAROSI
The family of a Huntington Beach man fatally shot by police last year has filed a wrongful-death lawsuit against the city, alleging that the man was unarmed when an officer fired several shots execution-style into his stomach. The lawsuit, filed Monday in Orange County Superior Court, seeks unspecified compensatory and punitive damages for the family of David Blackman.
NEWS
April 21, 1985 | LYNDON STAMBLER, Times Staff Writer
The City of Santa Monica, actress Barbra Streisand and movie producer Jon Peters have settled a wrongful death lawsuit stemming from an auto accident involving a Santa Monica municipal bus and a caretaker who worked for Streisand and Peters. The settlement, which was approved by Santa Monica Superior Court Judge Harry Mock this week, requires the parties to pay $87,500 to the heirs and estate of Paul Zimmerman, 35, who was struck on Dec.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb
Brian Panish was indignant as the two men argued in the judge's chambers. "Judge," the Michael Jackson family attorney snapped, "if I want to give him the finger, I know how to give him the finger. " "And you did it quite well twice," replied Marvin Putnam, an attorney for entertainment giant AEG. Panish denied doing any such thing but added, "If he wants me to give him the finger, I'm happy to do that. " The trial over whether a division of one of America's most powerful entertainment conglomerates is liable in the death of a legendary pop star has been filled with testimony about Jackson's drug use, his physical and mental deterioration and his growing fears as a comeback tour approached.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb and Matt Hamilton
Michael Jackson's ex-wife testified Wednesday that the singer used propofol to sleep on two occasions while giving concerts in Germany in the mid-1990s, the first evidence in the wrongful-death trial that he had previously used the powerful anesthetic - which eventually killed him - for other than medical procedures. Debbie Rowe said she and Jackson both called Dr. Allan Metzger, Jackson's internist, complaining the singer couldn't sleep. She said Jackson told her that sleeping pills hadn't worked and that "he was at the end of his rope.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb
A lot of people are making a lot of money off the Michael Jackson wrongful-death case - and then there are the lawyers. Witnesses in the case are being paid huge sums to analyze the pop star's earning power, his health, his popularity, even his inability to get a good night's sleep. Attorneys representing concert promoter AEG Live on the one side and Jackson's mother and his three children on the other have so far spent around $1 million just on experts who have testified about how much money the singer could have earned had he not died in 2009 from an overdose of the anesthetic propofol.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2013 | By Kate Mather
Entertainment group AEG did not properly check Dr. Conrad Murray's background before bringing him on board for Michael Jackson's ill-fated "This Is It" tour, a human-resources consultant testified Monday. Jean Seawright, head of the Florida-based Seawright & Associates consulting group, said that based on her review of the case, AEG Live "did indeed fail to follow adequate hiring practices" in the selection of Murray, regardless of whether he was considered a company employee or independent contractor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles County Superior Court judge presiding over the Michael Jackson wrongful-death suit admonished AEG Live's chief executive Monday to answer the questions from the Jackson family's attorney. Randy Phillips, who attended two years of law school, was on the stand for the fourth day when Judge Yvette Palazuelos halted proceedings and sent jurors out of the courtroom. She turned to the witness. "Mr. Phillips," she said, "you need to answer the questions being asked without comments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb and Corina Knoll, Los Angeles Times
In his opening statement in the Michael Jackson wrongful-death suit, an attorney for AEG said his side would expose the singer's secrets. "We're going to show some ugly stuff," Marvin Putnam said. But on Wednesday, it was lawyers for the singer's family who revealed some ugly stuff from AEG. Hours before Anschutz Entertainment Group executives headed to Michael Jackson's Holmby Hills home to sign multimillion-dollar contracts for his 50 concerts in London, the firm's top lawyer called Jackson "the freak" in an email.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1995
The family of saxophonist Donald Myrick, who was killed by a Santa Monica police officer two years ago, has settled its lawsuit against the city for $400,000. The former Earth, Wind and Fire band member was shot down when police mistook a butane lighter he was holding for a gun while serving a search warrant at his West Los Angeles apartment in 1993.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2013 | By Corina Knoll, Los Angeles Times
Michael Jackson's diminishing figure - so thin that a costume designer claimed he could see the pop star's heartbeat through his skin - failed to even concern his own manager, according to testimony given Friday. "Get him a bucket of chicken," Frank DiLeo replied when told of the singer's dramatic weight loss, Karen Faye said. "It was such a cold response," said Faye. "I mean, it broke my heart. " Over two days on the witness stand, Jackson's longtime friend and hair and makeup artist offered dramatic and sometimes emotional testimony in a trial that will determine whether the music legend's mother and three children are awarded damages in the millions - even billions - for his death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb, Los Angeles Times
When he died, Michael Jackson had a cocktail of anti-depressant and mood drugs in his system as well as a level of the anesthetic propofol typical of a patient undergoing major surgery. The revelation came during testimony Monday in the lawsuit Jackson's mother and children have filed against AEG, the entertainment giant that was promoting the singer's comeback concert series in London when he died. Dr. Christopher Rogers, the Los Angeles County deputy medical examiner, testified that after toxicology tests found Jackson had used propofol, he consulted with an anesthesiologist.
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