Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsWrongful Termination
IN THE NEWS

Wrongful Termination

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
October 13, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
The captain of the ill-fated cruise ship that ran aground on the Tuscany coast in January, killing 32 people, faces charges of manslaughter and abandoning the ship during a preliminary hearing next week. Still, Francesco Schettino, former captain of the Costa Concordia, has sued, claiming wrongful termination from his job after the accident, according to his lawyer. "It is the right of every worker to appeal against his dismissal and Capt. Schettino has done no more than exercise that right," his lawyer Bruno Leporatti told Reuters News.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 18, 2013 | Lisa Dillman
Longtime Southern California swim coach Bill Jewell has been banned for three years by USA Swimming for violations of its code of conduct. Jewell had been coaching at Golden West Swim Club in Huntington Beach since the summer of 2011, and, before that, at Fullerton Aquatics Sports Team (FAST). According to USA Swimming, he waived his right on June 10 to a National Board of Review hearing and accepted the three-year membership ban, effective immediately. The behavior that led to USA Swimming's action occurred during Jewell's stint at FAST.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
July 7, 1994
Challenging a wrongful termination lawsuit brought by its former president, Abbey Healthcare Group Inc. said Wednesday it has filed several counterclaims against Victor Chaltiel. The Costa Mesa-based provider of home health-care services said it is seeking "substantial monetary relief" for certain representations Chaltiel allegedly made before he joined Abbey late last year.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
With a reputation for squeaky-clean, family entertainment, Disneyland and neighboring Disney California Adventure have zero tolerance for misbehavior among workers. So when a theme park worker is accused of misconduct, the story usually makes headlines. The latest example came Wednesday when Christian Barnes, 22, an "outdoor vendor," was arrested in connection with a "dry-ice bomb" in the park . "We take matters like this very seriously and are working closely with local authorities," Disney spokeswoman Suzi Brown said of the latest incident.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1995 | LESLEY WRIGHT
A former city official has filed a wrongful-termination lawsuit alleging that her gender, age and religion were factors in her dismissal. Ellen Angele Bonneville, former operations manager of the Economic Development Department, was dismissed from her job in November, 1994, during a restructuring. In a suit filed Aug. 11 in Orange County Superior Court, she alleges that she was fired because she was over 40, a woman and "not a Mormon."
BUSINESS
June 7, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
A high-level Hughes Aircraft manager, who accused Hughes in a federal lawsuit of defrauding the government of $40 million, has had a second lawsuit alleging wrongful termination thrown out of federal court. U.S District Judge Stephen V. Wilson Monday dismissed the wrongful termination suit brought last January by William J. Schumer, who had alleged that he was demoted because he refused to participate in illegal activities. Last year, Schumer was moved from division director of contracts at Hughes to assistant division director at another Hughes group.
BUSINESS
January 1, 1990 | Gregory Crouch, Times staff writer
Donald Bott, 55, of San Clemente claimed he was terminated from his 17-year job as Santa Ana's director of personnel in 1983 because of his age and his efforts to expose wrongdoing in city hiring. Six months ago, a jury decided it didn't believe him. But last week, Superior Court Judge Leonard Goldstein said he did and overturned the jury's verdict, awarding Bott $1.8 million. The case is a good example of the difficulties involved in proving a wrongful termination lawsuit.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1988 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Although more fired employees are seeking legal recourse in the courts, a new study by the Rand Corp. suggests that terminated employees and their employers would do better financially by trying to settle their differences out of court rather than going to trial. "Unless you have a very good case, don't bother (filing suit)," said James N. Dertouzos, a Rand economist, who was one of three authors of the study published by the nonprofit, Santa Monica-based research institute.
SPORTS
January 1, 1994 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Jim Huffman's wrongful termination suit against Cal State Fullerton goes to trial, the school will argue he was fired as Titan women's volleyball coach because he didn't do his job very well. But Huffman's attorneys will rely heavily on depositions that are seen as supporting their contention that he was terminated simply because some administrators considered him a pain in the neck. The trial is scheduled to begin Monday in Orange County Superior Court. The $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2012 | By Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times
"Desperate Housewives" creator Marc Cherry testified Wednesday that he killed off Wisteria Lane seductress Edie Britt in the fifth season because there were simply no more male characters for her to bed. "We had played out as many romantic complications with each of the women's husbands" as possible, Cherry told a Los Angeles jury in a wrongful-termination suit brought by Nicollette Sheridan, the actress who played Edie. The character had dalliances with the spouses or former spouses of three of the main housewives — played by Teri Hatcher, Eva Longoria and Marcia Cross — and the husband of the fourth — played by Felicity Huffman — "would never cheat," Cherry said.
SPORTS
April 5, 2013 | By Dan Loumena
The Rutgers basketball scandal, one day removed from Mike Rice getting fired as coach for his abusive behavior, continued to grow Thursday with assistant coach Jimmy Martelli resigning and the university faculty and New Jersey politicians calling for the removal of Athletic Director Tim Pernetti and President Robert Barchi. Rice was fired Wednesday as public outcry gained momentum after video was released by ESPN on Tuesday showing the coach hitting, shoving, throwing basketballs at and berating his players with gay slurs.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2013 | By E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times
An appeals court has overturned a $3.8-million jury award to a former Countrywide Financial Corp. human resources executive who contended he was fired because he refused to lie for the giant home lender and exposed unsafe working conditions. Michael Winston, a former leadership coach for Countrywide executives, won a wrongful-termination verdict in February 2011 from a Los Angeles County Superior Court jury in Van Nuys. The suit named as defendants Countrywide and Bank of America Corp., which acquired the high-risk mortgage specialist in 2008 and decided against retaining Winston.
SPORTS
December 7, 2012 | By Lisa Dillman
Golden West Swim Club said it has found nothing to support allegations of inappropriate behavior by assistant swim coach William Jewell or evidence of wrongdoing by his boss, famed former Olympic swim coach Mark Schubert, according to a letter from the club's president. The organization hired an outside firm to conduct an investigation after former swim team employee Dia Rianda sued Schubert for wrongful termination in September, alleging Schubert ignored complaints she made regarding sexually inappropriate behavior displayed by Jewell.
BUSINESS
October 13, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
The captain of the ill-fated cruise ship that ran aground on the Tuscany coast in January, killing 32 people, faces charges of manslaughter and abandoning the ship during a preliminary hearing next week. Still, Francesco Schettino, former captain of the Costa Concordia, has sued, claiming wrongful termination from his job after the accident, according to his lawyer. "It is the right of every worker to appeal against his dismissal and Capt. Schettino has done no more than exercise that right," his lawyer Bruno Leporatti told Reuters News.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2012 | By Corina Knoll, Los Angeles Times
A corn dog and a few drag queens were never meant to wreak such havoc. But there they were, captured in photos deemed inappropriate because of their "sexual content. " It was an August afternoon and Mitch Stein was asked to see the principal of Covina's Charter Oak High School, where he worked as an assistant water polo coach. Someone had anonymously dropped off printouts of Stein's Facebook and Myspace pages. The envelope included a photo of Stein wearing eyeliner and surrounded by men decked out in bustiers, wigs and makeup.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2012 | By Ben Fritz and Alex Pham, Los Angeles Times
One day before trial was set to begin in a trio of lawsuits with claims totaling more than $2 billion, video game publisher Activision Blizzard Inc. reached a settlement with the co-creators of the "Call of Duty" series and 40 developers who worked on the games. The last-minute agreement Thursday ended two years of litigation during which nasty accusations flew back and forth and Santa Monica-based Activision endured the embarrassing disclosure of private contracts and a plot, code-named Project Icebreaker, to secretly monitor developers' email and voice mails.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1999 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former manager at Atlas Chrysler Plymouth sued the Costa Mesa auto dealership, its corporate owner and his onetime supervisor Wednesday, alleging that he was fired for complaining about a pattern of racial discrimination by his supervisor. Matthew Manley contends in the wrongful termination suit that the dealership's general manager at the time, Patrick Doyle, ordered him to fire employees because of their race.
SPORTS
July 27, 1994 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 2 1/2-year legal battle between former Cal State Fullerton volleyball Coach Jim Huffman and the Cal State University system ended Tuesday when attorneys reached an out-of-court settlement of the coach's wrongful-termination case. The CSU system has agreed to pay Huffman $1.35 million and an additional $300,000 in attorney fees--the exact amounts a Superior Court jury and judge ordered the system to pay Huffman last winter. In exchange for dropping its appeal of the Feb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2012 | By Harriet Ryan and Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times
Four years after a sweeps week audience watched Edie Britt, the bed-hopping real estate agent in "Desperate Housewives," draw her last breath, a Los Angeles jury said Monday that it could not decide the cause of her death. A judge declared a mistrial in Nicollette Sheridan's wrongful-termination suit after jurors said they were deadlocked as to whether the actress' character was killed off the ABC show in an act of retaliation or for creative reasons. Eight jurors — one short of the nine required for a verdict in civil court — sided with Sheridan, who alleged that she was written off the show because she complained that the program's creator, Marc Cherry, had struck her in the head during a 2008 rehearsal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2012 | By Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times
With "Desperate Housewives" winding up its lucrative eight-season run on ABC, its creator took a moment last week to distill what he called the show's "original blend" of television genres. "Part comedy, part drama, part mystery," Marc Cherry said. To the audience he addressed, a Los Angeles jury in a lawsuit brought by a former actress on the show, the concept of watching something that was by turns funny, sad and confounding was not a foreign one. The two-week trial set for closing arguments Tuesday often seemed a black comedy about a black comedy.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|