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Wyatt Earp

ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1993 | JAMES GRANT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
He goes by the name "Wyatt Earp" and is an eerie dead ringer for the quintessentially Western-looking Marlboro Man. But 31-year-old mortgage banker and aspiring actor Glen Wyatt Earp is not about to ride off into the sunset anytime soon. One of the few true-blood relatives of the legendary Western hero, who had no children, Earp is the famous frontier marshal's fifth cousin. (The outlaw was fourth-generation American and the aspiring actor is ninth-generation Earp.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1993 | JANE GALBRAITH
If proof was needed that the Western is back big time in Hollywood, one would only have to have been near the Four Corners area of the Southwest this summer when director Simon Wincer said his production of "Lightning Jack" was "rubbing shoulders" with "Wyatt Earp," two "Geronimos" (one a Columbia feature, the other a TNT movie) while the cast and crew of "City Slickers II," a Western of sorts, rode in close behind.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1993 | KENT BLACK, Kent Black is a free-lance writer based in Los Angeles. and
Dennis Quaid looks like microwaved death. The six-foot actor is down to 147 pounds. The tanned, leathery skin around his huge mustache has a gray tinge to it. Strolling around his neighborhood in Brentwood, he looks like a desert rat whose souped-up Monte Carlo has broken down, forcing him to case houses for gas money back to the Mojave.
NEWS
October 16, 1993 | Associated Press
A musty old photo believed to show Wyatt Earp as a fresh-faced teen-ager turned up in the archives of a newspaper preparing a story on the legendary gambler and lawman. The family portrait published by the San Francisco Examiner on Friday shows three adults and three children. The Examiner said the picture languished in its photo library until it was discovered recently by an employee. An accompanying article quotes historians who identify two of the adults as Earp's parents.
SPORTS
April 13, 1993 | MIKE REILLEY
Hoping to fill a need for a strong outside shooter, the UC Irvine men's basketball team landed a commitment from Bakersfield College guard Chris Brown over the weekend. Brown, a 6-foot-2 sophomore with two years of eligibility remaining, committed to the Anteaters after a weekend visit and plans to sign a letter of intent with them Wednesday. Brown led Bakersfield in scoring last season with a 19.1 average. He shot 40.9% from three-point range, making 130 of 318 shots.
NEWS
February 6, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mahamoud Hassan and Mahad Elmi must be two of the most hapless thieves in all of Somalia. Thousands of robberies are committed daily in this capital. There is no law, no functioning police force and not a single sitting judge. And yet Hassan and Elmi managed to get themselves locked up in a rotting prison on the bluff overlooking the movements of U.S. troops. Hassan, 28, got five years hard time for stealing a knife and $10.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1992 | ROBERT MIMS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
More than a century after the shootout at the O.K. Corral at Tombstone, Ariz., the term U.S. marshal still evokes Wyatt Earp spilling outlaws' blood in the desert dust. Earp was many things--gambler, gunfighter, saloonkeeper, miner, buffalo hunter and purported horse thief--but it was that gunfight on Oct. 26, 1881, that made him the most famous lawman of the marshals' 202-year history. U.S.
SPORTS
March 31, 1991 | ED SCHUYLER JR., ASSOCIATED PRESS
Boxing referees often take a heap of vocal abuse. Sometimes the abuse becomes physical. Richard Steele ended up on the ring floor being kicked in the leg and chest after he decided Donovan "Razor" Ruddock had had enough in the seventh round against Mike Tyson. The referee is helpless in such circumstances. Well, there was one referee. . . . It was Dec.
BOOKS
December 17, 1989 | SONJA BOLLE
Wyatt Earp, the legendary gunslinger whom readers of Western history have grown to love or hate, was not known in his lifetime for the famous shoot-out at the OK Corral, writes Jack DeMattos. That piece of mythologizing only occurred two years after his death in 1929, when Stuart N. Lake published "Wyatt Earp: Frontier Marshal." In his lifetime, Earp did become a household word, but he did so because of a controversy over his decision as referee of a world heavyweight title fight.
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