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NEWS
June 4, 1986 | ROBERT SCHEER, Times Staff Writer
Results from tests of the X-ray laser, a key component in the Administration's Strategic Defense Initiative, contained "inaccuracies," a recent report by the Government Accounting Office says. However, in a declassified summary obtained Tuesday by The Times, the GAO denied that the program has been "arbitrarily accelerated" on the basis of the erroneous data.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1996
Gregg Easterbrook ("An Antimissile Defense? You See It Only in Movies," Opinion, Sept. 15) writes, "Tens of billions spent during the 1980s by the Reagan administration on SDI [Strategic Defense Initiative] resulted in no practical anti-ICBM--not even the notorious X-ray laser, which itself required detonating nuclear explosions to oppose nuclear warheads." Readers may be interested to know that the actual amount spent on the SDI and Theater Missile Defense programs since 1983 is $51 billion, including nearly $3 billion for the X-ray laser and other so-called nuclear-directed energy weapons, and for space-based reactors and nuclear propulsion systems (these and other figures are in constant 1996 dollars)
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NEWS
January 21, 1987 | Associated Press
A scientist whose formula for building an X-ray laser plays a crucial role in the development of the Strategic Defense Initiative, or "Star Wars," is returning as a consultant to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Last fall, Peter Hagelstein, 32, left the nuclear weapons design center to work on peaceful uses of his research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
BOOKS
March 15, 1992
As a science writer who has followed closely the Strategic Defense Initiative, I have a somewhat different view than that of William Broad ("Teller's War," reviewed by Lee Dembart, Feb. 16). It's certainly true that the X-ray laser represented the point of departure for early Reagan Administration interest in strategic missile defense. It's also true that much of that interest stemmed from a 1980 nuclear test, called Dauphin, that lacked adequate instruments. But the problems with Dauphin, and with the X-ray laser, became evident rather rapidly.
NEWS
October 21, 1987 | DAN MORAIN and RICHARD E. MEYER, Times Staff Writers
The scientist who directed nuclear X-ray laser research for President Reagan's "Star Wars" program says physicist Edward Teller and a fellow scientist, Lowell Wood, have conveyed "overly optimistic, technically incorrect" information about the laser research to the nation's top policy makers. Roy D. Woodruff, former associate director for defense systems at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, also charges that Roger E.
MAGAZINE
July 17, 1988 | ROBERT SCHEER, Robert Scheer, a Times staff writer whose collection of essays, "Thinking Tunafish, Talking Death," will be published by Hill and Wang this fall, has written extensively about the Strategic Defense Initiative.
IN THE DUSTY town of Livermore, nestled in the Amador Valley, where cows compete with zinfindel grapes for land not yet requisitioned by the local nuclear weapons lab, the dreams of Edward Teller, father of the H-bomb and "Star Wars," may finally have gone to ground. These are dark, brooding days for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, "the house that Teller built," a rambling complex of Quonset huts and low-rise office buildings two hours due east of San Francisco.
NEWS
November 12, 1985 | ROBERT SCHEER, Times Staff Writer
The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is proceeding with plans for a $30-million test of its nuclear-driven X-ray laser weapon despite charges from other government scientists that there are serious flaws in the experiment's design, The Times has learned.
NEWS
January 22, 1987
The scientist whose idea for an X-ray laser inspired President Reagan's "Star Wars" plan is returning to a nuclear weapons research center he left because of objections to military work. Peter Hagelstein, 32, said in an interview published in the San Jose Mercury News that he will do only unclassified, non-weapons work on the X-ray laser program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. His contract calls for him to serve as a consultant for up to 45 days this year at a rate of $315 a day.
NEWS
September 23, 1985 | ROBERT SCHEER, Times Staff Writer
"But is it a bomb?" Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger wanted to know one day walking through the halls of the Pentagon with his then-undersecretary, Richard D. Delauer. Weinberger was inquiring about the X-ray laser, a key weapon in President Reagan's "Star Wars" program. "I had to tell him," Delauer recalled recently, "you're going to have to detonate a nuclear bomb in space. That's how you're going to get the X-ray." But Weinberger repeated his question: "It's not a bomb, is it?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1988
Commendations are in order for The Times editorial taking to task Herrington for his statements about work at the Livermore lab. The idea, as Herrington said, that the public interest is served by keeping secret all discussion regarding misinformation to the public and the nation's highest policy-makers is exactly 180 degrees backwards. Science advancement and good national policy both depend upon correct and truthful technical facts. How can incorrect or misleading scientific information possibly lead to proper national policy?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1988
As one who believes that the University of California has no business managing two laboratories whose primary function is the design of new nuclear weapons, I was struck by remarks made by Herrington at Livermore lab ("Energy Secretary Warns Weapons Scientists Not to Disagree in Public," Part I, July 23). Speaking of the continuing controversy at the lab involving the bomb-pumped X-ray laser, overly optimistic appraisals of its effectiveness given by fellow scientists Teller and Wood, and attempted corrective measures taken by Woodruff, Herrington stated that, "I think there should be freedom of expression within the laboratory, but I don't favor having scientists going public on opposite sides of the issue if it's going to be damaging to the laboratory.
MAGAZINE
July 17, 1988 | ROBERT SCHEER, Robert Scheer, a Times staff writer whose collection of essays, "Thinking Tunafish, Talking Death," will be published by Hill and Wang this fall, has written extensively about the Strategic Defense Initiative.
IN THE DUSTY town of Livermore, nestled in the Amador Valley, where cows compete with zinfindel grapes for land not yet requisitioned by the local nuclear weapons lab, the dreams of Edward Teller, father of the H-bomb and "Star Wars," may finally have gone to ground. These are dark, brooding days for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, "the house that Teller built," a rambling complex of Quonset huts and low-rise office buildings two hours due east of San Francisco.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
This remarkable new imaging technique is being developed to enable biologists to view all but the smallest components of living cells. Humans have long had a fascination with things too small to be seen with the naked eye. As long as 3,000 years ago, engravers used glass globes filled with water as magnifiers as they worked so that they could see fine details of their designs. Ancient Romans used crude lenses chipped from rock crystals for the same purpose.
NEWS
October 21, 1987 | DAN MORAIN and RICHARD E. MEYER, Times Staff Writers
The scientist who directed nuclear X-ray laser research for President Reagan's "Star Wars" program says physicist Edward Teller and a fellow scientist, Lowell Wood, have conveyed "overly optimistic, technically incorrect" information about the laser research to the nation's top policy makers. Roy D. Woodruff, former associate director for defense systems at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, also charges that Roger E.
NEWS
January 22, 1987
The scientist whose idea for an X-ray laser inspired President Reagan's "Star Wars" plan is returning to a nuclear weapons research center he left because of objections to military work. Peter Hagelstein, 32, said in an interview published in the San Jose Mercury News that he will do only unclassified, non-weapons work on the X-ray laser program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. His contract calls for him to serve as a consultant for up to 45 days this year at a rate of $315 a day.
NEWS
January 21, 1987 | Associated Press
A scientist whose formula for building an X-ray laser plays a crucial role in the development of the Strategic Defense Initiative, or "Star Wars," is returning as a consultant to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Last fall, Peter Hagelstein, 32, left the nuclear weapons design center to work on peaceful uses of his research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
OPINION
January 5, 1986
President Reagan has repeatedly said that the goal of his Strategic Defense Initiative is to determine whether a non- nuclear system can be developed to destroy Soviet missiles bound for the United States. It's about time that the President squared that statement with the multimillion-dollar program to develop a laser weapon powered by a nuclear explosion. There may or may not be good reason for the Administration's refusal to accept the Soviet proposal for a nuclear-test moratorium.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1985
The results of scientific experiments can only be as valid as the accuracy of the instruments used to measure them. This elemental truth appears not to have been taken very seriously by researchers in one of the major areas of the "Star Wars" program: the quest for an X-ray laser capable of zapping attacking Soviet missiles.
NEWS
June 4, 1986 | ROBERT SCHEER, Times Staff Writer
Results from tests of the X-ray laser, a key component in the Administration's Strategic Defense Initiative, contained "inaccuracies," a recent report by the Government Accounting Office says. However, in a declassified summary obtained Tuesday by The Times, the GAO denied that the program has been "arbitrarily accelerated" on the basis of the erroneous data.
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