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NEWS
May 28, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Sacramento Superior Court judge has decided that Blue Shield was not obligated to provide the weight-loss drug Xenical to morbidly obese patients. Judge Emily Vasquez ruled Friday that even though a new state law allows regulators to draw up a list of what should be covered by health plans, that law only applies to contracts written after Jan. 1, 2003. The first hearing on which drugs should be included on the list is scheduled for late June. Blue Shield argued in court that it shouldn't be forced to pay for so-called lifestyle drugs for those it insured.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2002 | CHARLES ORNSTEIN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
A state judge in Sacramento ruled Tuesday that HMO regulators cannot force Blue Shield of California to provide a weight-loss drug to an obese member. Superior Court Judge Joe S. Gray issued a preliminary injunction that prevents the state from penalizing the HMO for not covering the drug Xenical. The state had proposed to fine Blue Shield $270,000 for refusing to participate in an independent medical review that later determined that the patient should receive the medicine.
NEWS
January 20, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
An experimental diet drug, which scientists hope is safer than the ill-fated Redux and fen-phen, helped obese people shed pounds and keep them off in a two-year study, researchers at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center in Manhattan said. Orlistat, trade-named Xenical, has been judged safe and effective enough for the U.S. market by an advisory panel to the Food and Drug Administration.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2000 | Reuters
Four people and a Miami-based pharmaceutical supply company have been charged with conspiring to illegally sell prescription drugs over the Internet, federal authorities said. The Justice Department and Food and Drug Administration said the defendants were indicted for conspiring to sell such drugs as Viagra, Xenical, Celebrex, Propecia and Claritin-D to people who lacked valid prescriptions. Called the Norfolk Men's Clinic, the Web site (http://www.viagra.au.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2007 | Carla Hall, Times Staff Writer
At 9:30 a.m. on Thursday, 12 boxes of alli, the first FDA-sanctioned diet drug to be sold without a prescription, were placed on the top shelf of a Santa Monica Walgreens' diet section. Four hours later, all but one had been sold. "I have never in my life experienced anything like this," store manager Roe Love, a pharmacist for 20 years, said as she eyed the empty space next to the last box of 90 capsules selling for $59.99.
NEWS
April 27, 1999 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration on Monday approved a new diet drug for the seriously obese, the first of a new class of diet drugs that works by blocking the body's absorption of fat, rather than by suppressing the appetite. The drug, Xenical, developed by Hoffmann-LaRoche Inc., of Nutley, N.J., is part of a category of drugs known as lipase inhibitors because they prevent the body from producing lipase, an enzyme necessary for the breakdown of fat molecules.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2002 | CHARLES ORNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Legislature gave its final approval Friday to a measure that would allow pharmacies to sell up to 30 syringes, or hypodermic needles, to an adult without a prescription. Supporters say over-the-counter syringe sales would reduce the spread of HIV and infectious hepatitis among drug users, saving millions of dollars in medical costs.
HEALTH
June 20, 2005 | From Newsday
Obese teenagers who took the weight loss drug orlistat while making lifestyle changes gained less weight over 54 weeks, on average, than a control group of teens who changed behaviors but took a dummy pill, a study has found. Overall, teens taking orlistat experienced a reduction in body mass index, a critical measure of whether one's weight falls within a healthy range for one's height, while those in the placebo group saw their BMIs rise.
NEWS
September 26, 1998 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The arrival this week of the latest wonder drugs--the anti-impotence pill Viagra and a new anti-obesity tablet called Xenical--has Britons questioning just how much health and happiness taxpayers should subsidize. Fearing a huge and costly demand, Britain's National Health Service has banned its doctors from prescribing Viagra until the department can come up with a way to ensure that only "deserving" patients get the drug for a reduced fee.
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