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Xenotransplants

NEWS
August 17, 2000 | CATHY PASCUAL and THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The heated race to transplant pig organs into human recipients hit a stumbling block Wednesday with the release of research that seems to buttress the greatest fear of opponents--that such transplants would circulate dangerous pig viruses into the human population. The discovery comes at a time when British authorities are poised to grant permission for the first such xenotransplants in humans.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2000
On Tuesday, executives at the British biotechnology firm PPL Therapeutics proudly carted out five cute piglets that their Virginia-based researchers recently succeeded in cloning. It's a major achievement, marking the fourth kind of mammal ever to be cloned and moving scientists closer to growing pigs with gene-altered organs that can be transplanted into people.
NEWS
January 12, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
A 62-year-old Pittsburgh man who received a baboon liver in a Sunday evening operation was groggy but in good condition Monday, his surgeons said. The unidentified man, who before the 13-hour operation had only an estimated 30 days to live because of a fatal liver disease, is the second human to receive a baboon liver. He could not be given a human liver because of an active hepatitis B infection, which would infect and destroy a transplanted human liver.
NEWS
October 13, 1992 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Burbank woman who was kept alive with a transplanted pig's liver in an unprecedented procedure died Monday night before she could go into surgery to receive a human liver, a spokesman for Cedars-Sinai Medical Center said. The pig's liver kept Susan Fowler, 26, alive for more than 30 hours until a donated human liver became available Monday, hospital officials said. But the surgery to transplant the human liver never got under way, said hospital spokesman Ronald Wise.
NEWS
August 24, 2001 | From the Washington Post
Most or all of the human embryonic stem cell colonies approved for research funding under a new Bush administration policy have been mixed in the laboratory with mouse cells, possibly creating substantial hurdles for scientists trying to turn the colonies into treatments for Parkinson's disease, spinal cord injuries and other ailments.
HEALTH
August 23, 1999 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II
The heat of August may seem like a strange time to be talking about winter drownings, but new research suggests that rescuers may be taking a wrong approach in their attempts to revive people who have fallen into icy ponds and lakes. Conventional wisdom holds that such victims typically die of hypothermia, a cold-induced stoppage of the heart, and most first aid is now directed at restoring normal body temperatures.
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