Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsXhosa Tribe
IN THE NEWS

Xhosa Tribe

FEATURED ARTICLES
BOOKS
June 28, 1992 | ALEX RAKSIN
FRONTIERS: The Epic of South Africa's Creation and the Tragedy of the Xhosa People by Noel Mostert (Knopf: $35; 1355 pp.). Sophocles himself could not have illustrated Western sin any better than the tragic encounter between South Africa's indigenous Xhosa tribe and European settlers in the 19th Century. Archetypal innocents, the Xhosa (pronounced KO-saw ) centered their peaceful, democratic society around their beloved cattle.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
December 9, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
South Africa's powerful Xhosa and Zulu nations sealed an important union as Nelson Mandela's great-grandnephew and King Goodwill Zwelithini's daughter wed. The marriage ceremony of Tembu Chief Nfundo Bovulengwe Mtirara and Princess Nandi Zulu completed its fourth and final day, as guests and neighbors presented gifts from cattle to DVD players.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 25, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government declared a state of emergency in 27 black townships Friday, giving the police broad powers to detain residents, break up gatherings and search without warrants in an effort to end factional fighting among blacks that has taken more than 500 lives in the last two weeks.
BOOKS
June 28, 1992 | ALEX RAKSIN
FRONTIERS: The Epic of South Africa's Creation and the Tragedy of the Xhosa People by Noel Mostert (Knopf: $35; 1355 pp.). Sophocles himself could not have illustrated Western sin any better than the tragic encounter between South Africa's indigenous Xhosa tribe and European settlers in the 19th Century. Archetypal innocents, the Xhosa (pronounced KO-saw ) centered their peaceful, democratic society around their beloved cattle.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | from Reuters
South Africa began calling up army reservists Saturday and sent military reinforcements with armored cars to help police enforce emergency powers in battle-ravaged black townships near Johannesburg. District army chief Gen. Wessel Kritzinger said in a statement: "Additional troops are being deployed to stabilize the violent situation which has arisen over the past few weeks."
NEWS
August 27, 1990 | From Associated Press
Rival tribal chiefs blamed the white-led government Sunday for the black factional fighting around Johannesburg that has claimed more than 500 lives in the past two weeks. Most of the fighting has involved Zulus loyal to the conservative Inkatha movement against Xhosas and other blacks who support the African National Congress. A delegation of Zulu and Xhosa chiefs toured troubled townships Sunday and pleaded for an end to the fighting.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | From Associated Press
Nelson Mandela on Thursday urged the government to use troops to stop violence in black townships, where Zulu and Xhosa war bands clashed for the 12th day with spears, axes and knives. Police said four people died. President Frederik W. de Klerk said the government would announce new moves today to stop the tribal fighting, in which 500 people have been killed. He said the moves would include additional restrictions on the ownership of weapons, but he did not elaborate.
NEWS
September 17, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The traditional leader of the Zulus, King Goodwill Zwelithini, traveled far from the center of his kingdom Sunday to urge thousands of his followers at rallies to "put out the fires of violence." "I have come to tell my father's people . . . that I, as king of the Zulus, will not tolerate violence perpetrated in the name of" the Zulu nation, said Zwelithini, a highly respected figure among South Africa"s 7 million Zulus.
NEWS
August 23, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pleas for peace from white and black leaders went unheeded Wednesday as 100 more black South Africans were stabbed, hacked or burned to death in factional fighting around Johannesburg. The latest killings brought the death toll to more than 500 in the last 10 days. Township streets were barricaded with burning tires, and small bands of Zulu and Xhosa fighters with homemade weapons clashed throughout the day.
NEWS
September 4, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like most inhabitants of the vast urban melting pot of Soweto, Wilson and Isabel Zitha have fond, if not particularly strong, feelings about their ancient cultural heritages. So, when Zulus began battling Xhosas in the streets outside their modest home recently, Wilson, who is Xhosa, and Isabel, who is Zulu, looked on in stunned silence. And Isabel began to feel ashamed of her own roots. "How can I say I am Zulu? People are starting to hate us," she said.
NEWS
September 17, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The traditional leader of the Zulus, King Goodwill Zwelithini, traveled far from the center of his kingdom Sunday to urge thousands of his followers at rallies to "put out the fires of violence." "I have come to tell my father's people . . . that I, as king of the Zulus, will not tolerate violence perpetrated in the name of" the Zulu nation, said Zwelithini, a highly respected figure among South Africa"s 7 million Zulus.
NEWS
September 4, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like most inhabitants of the vast urban melting pot of Soweto, Wilson and Isabel Zitha have fond, if not particularly strong, feelings about their ancient cultural heritages. So, when Zulus began battling Xhosas in the streets outside their modest home recently, Wilson, who is Xhosa, and Isabel, who is Zulu, looked on in stunned silence. And Isabel began to feel ashamed of her own roots. "How can I say I am Zulu? People are starting to hate us," she said.
NEWS
August 28, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Heeding a call from the African National Congress, tens of thousands of blacks joined a one-day work stoppage Monday to protest recent internecine fighting in Johannesburg townships and to mourn the 515 dead. Archbishop Desmond Tutu, in an emotional address delivered over seven coffins in Soweto, said police had triggered the violence by siding against the ANC. "There are those who . . . don't want us to have our freedom," Tutu said, "so they have made us fight one another.
NEWS
August 27, 1990 | From Associated Press
Rival tribal chiefs blamed the white-led government Sunday for the black factional fighting around Johannesburg that has claimed more than 500 lives in the past two weeks. Most of the fighting has involved Zulus loyal to the conservative Inkatha movement against Xhosas and other blacks who support the African National Congress. A delegation of Zulu and Xhosa chiefs toured troubled townships Sunday and pleaded for an end to the fighting.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | from Reuters
South Africa began calling up army reservists Saturday and sent military reinforcements with armored cars to help police enforce emergency powers in battle-ravaged black townships near Johannesburg. District army chief Gen. Wessel Kritzinger said in a statement: "Additional troops are being deployed to stabilize the violent situation which has arisen over the past few weeks."
NEWS
August 25, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government declared a state of emergency in 27 black townships Friday, giving the police broad powers to detain residents, break up gatherings and search without warrants in an effort to end factional fighting among blacks that has taken more than 500 lives in the last two weeks.
NEWS
August 28, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Heeding a call from the African National Congress, tens of thousands of blacks joined a one-day work stoppage Monday to protest recent internecine fighting in Johannesburg townships and to mourn the 515 dead. Archbishop Desmond Tutu, in an emotional address delivered over seven coffins in Soweto, said police had triggered the violence by siding against the ANC. "There are those who . . . don't want us to have our freedom," Tutu said, "so they have made us fight one another.
NEWS
August 25, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mangosuthu Gatsha Buthelezi, the persistent leader of the Zulu homeland, may have tried the patience of several white government Cabinet ministers this week when he insisted on reading them a list of every time he had offered to meet with Nelson Mandela. But, after hearing the 47 dates and events, everyone got the point. "People are actually dying because . . . Mandela will not talk with me," Buthelezi said.
NEWS
August 25, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mangosuthu Gatsha Buthelezi, the persistent leader of the Zulu homeland, may have tried the patience of several white government Cabinet ministers this week when he insisted on reading them a list of every time he had offered to meet with Nelson Mandela. But, after hearing the 47 dates and events, everyone got the point. "People are actually dying because . . . Mandela will not talk with me," Buthelezi said.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | From Associated Press
Nelson Mandela on Thursday urged the government to use troops to stop violence in black townships, where Zulu and Xhosa war bands clashed for the 12th day with spears, axes and knives. Police said four people died. President Frederik W. de Klerk said the government would announce new moves today to stop the tribal fighting, in which 500 people have been killed. He said the moves would include additional restrictions on the ownership of weapons, but he did not elaborate.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|