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BUSINESS
July 30, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. completed its purchase of XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. in an all-stock takeover valued at $2.76 billion. Sirius shares dropped 30 cents, or 16%, to $1.58 on investor concern over new stock and debt offerings.
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BUSINESS
November 26, 2009
Public is asked to vote on cable-TV fee hikes Time Warner Cable Inc. is asking the public for help as it tries to curtail increases in the programming fees it has to pay to carry cable channels and broadcast stations on its systems. The nation's second-largest cable TV operator unveiled an advertising campaign asking cable subscribers to vote online on whether it should "roll over" or "get tough" in negotiations over the fees. Time Warner Cable said it would use the results of the survey in upcoming contract renewal talks.
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BUSINESS
July 17, 2005
"Rivals, and Friends?" (July 10) was an interesting report on the satellite radio competitors Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. and XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. One is dismayed, however, to find that one of the competitors has hired as chief executive an executive from vacuous TV whose entire career has been based upon foisting tasteless entertainment upon the masses. Mel Karmazin, formerly of Viacom Inc., gives meaning to the New York media expression, "No one ever got rich by overestimating the taste of the public."
BUSINESS
November 13, 2009 | Jerry Hirsch
Los Angeles Times Publisher Eddy W. Hartenstein was named Thursday the non-executive chairman of Sirius XM Radio, replacing Gary Parsons. Parsons was the founder and former chairman of XM Satellite Radio and held on to the chairman's position after its merger with Sirius in 2008. Sirius Chief Executive Mel Karmazin said that Hartenstein, as an independent director, "will bring an important new perspective to the chairmanship," one that "our stockholders will benefit from." Hartenstein will remain publisher of The Times.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. reported a narrower loss, even as it remained unclear when regulators might take action on its plans to combine with rival XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. Sirius and XM had hoped to close their deal by the end of last year, but it's still being reviewed by the Justice Department and the Federal Communications Commission. Sirius Chief Executive Mel Karmazin said the firm was prepared to go forward on its own in the event its combination with XM wasn't approved, saying the company is "fully funded" to continue business.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
The proposed merger of Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. and XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. was opposed by four states that say the combination of the only two pay radio companies poses a threat to competition. Connecticut, Maryland, Ohio and Washington urged the Federal Communications Commission to reject the merger in a letter signed by the four states' attorneys general and posted on the FCC's website. The FCC is unlikely to take up the matter by the May 1 expiration of the companies' merger agreement, which has already been extended, said Paul Gallant, an analyst at Stanford Washington Research Group.
BUSINESS
June 30, 2002
The Recording Industry Assn. of America never fails to amaze ["Net Radio, Labels at Odds Over Royalties," June 24]. Their actions are like those of tin-pot dictators, destroying their country in a desperate attempt to preserve their empire. The underlying stupidity of their efforts and the unseemly influence and control that they have purchased politically have never been so well evidenced as in the current battle over Internet copyright royalties. They are literally fighting to shut down a phenomenon that allows many artists (a good percentage of whom they manage)
BUSINESS
March 12, 2008 | Thomas S. Mulligan, Times Staff Writer
Tribune Co., parent of the Los Angeles Times, Tuesday announced that it had hired radio veteran Lee Abrams as its first-ever chief innovation officer, "responsible for innovation across Tribune's publishing, broadcasting and interactive divisions." Abrams, 55, was senior vice president and chief creative officer at XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc., where he developed shows featuring the likes of Bob Dylan, Snoop Dogg, Willie Nelson, Quincy Jones and Wynton Marsalis. In a long career, he helped pioneer FM radio's successful album-oriented rock format, in which stations would play a half-dozen or more songs from an album rather than just the one or two that had been released as singles.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2008 | Jim Puzzanghera, Times Staff Writer
Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. and XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. agreed to pay $19.7 million to resolve outstanding violations involving some of their radios and transmitters, clearing what appeared to be the final obstacle to regulatory approval of their long-pending $3.9-billion merger, a top federal official said Thursday. "I'm optimistic that now we got this issue out of the way we can move forward with an approval," said Kevin J. Martin, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission.
BUSINESS
November 26, 2009
Public is asked to vote on cable-TV fee hikes Time Warner Cable Inc. is asking the public for help as it tries to curtail increases in the programming fees it has to pay to carry cable channels and broadcast stations on its systems. The nation's second-largest cable TV operator unveiled an advertising campaign asking cable subscribers to vote online on whether it should "roll over" or "get tough" in negotiations over the fees. Time Warner Cable said it would use the results of the survey in upcoming contract renewal talks.
BUSINESS
July 30, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. completed its purchase of XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. in an all-stock takeover valued at $2.76 billion. Sirius shares dropped 30 cents, or 16%, to $1.58 on investor concern over new stock and debt offerings.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2008 | Jim Puzzanghera, Times Staff Writer
Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. and XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. agreed to pay $19.7 million to resolve outstanding violations involving some of their radios and transmitters, clearing what appeared to be the final obstacle to regulatory approval of their long-pending $3.9-billion merger, a top federal official said Thursday. "I'm optimistic that now we got this issue out of the way we can move forward with an approval," said Kevin J. Martin, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
The proposed merger of Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. and XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. was opposed by four states that say the combination of the only two pay radio companies poses a threat to competition. Connecticut, Maryland, Ohio and Washington urged the Federal Communications Commission to reject the merger in a letter signed by the four states' attorneys general and posted on the FCC's website. The FCC is unlikely to take up the matter by the May 1 expiration of the companies' merger agreement, which has already been extended, said Paul Gallant, an analyst at Stanford Washington Research Group.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2008 | Thomas S. Mulligan, Times Staff Writer
Tribune Co., parent of the Los Angeles Times, Tuesday announced that it had hired radio veteran Lee Abrams as its first-ever chief innovation officer, "responsible for innovation across Tribune's publishing, broadcasting and interactive divisions." Abrams, 55, was senior vice president and chief creative officer at XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc., where he developed shows featuring the likes of Bob Dylan, Snoop Dogg, Willie Nelson, Quincy Jones and Wynton Marsalis. In a long career, he helped pioneer FM radio's successful album-oriented rock format, in which stations would play a half-dozen or more songs from an album rather than just the one or two that had been released as singles.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. reported a narrower loss, even as it remained unclear when regulators might take action on its plans to combine with rival XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. Sirius and XM had hoped to close their deal by the end of last year, but it's still being reviewed by the Justice Department and the Federal Communications Commission. Sirius Chief Executive Mel Karmazin said the firm was prepared to go forward on its own in the event its combination with XM wasn't approved, saying the company is "fully funded" to continue business.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2005
"Rivals, and Friends?" (July 10) was an interesting report on the satellite radio competitors Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. and XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. One is dismayed, however, to find that one of the competitors has hired as chief executive an executive from vacuous TV whose entire career has been based upon foisting tasteless entertainment upon the masses. Mel Karmazin, formerly of Viacom Inc., gives meaning to the New York media expression, "No one ever got rich by overestimating the taste of the public."
BUSINESS
November 13, 2009 | Jerry Hirsch
Los Angeles Times Publisher Eddy W. Hartenstein was named Thursday the non-executive chairman of Sirius XM Radio, replacing Gary Parsons. Parsons was the founder and former chairman of XM Satellite Radio and held on to the chairman's position after its merger with Sirius in 2008. Sirius Chief Executive Mel Karmazin said that Hartenstein, as an independent director, "will bring an important new perspective to the chairmanship," one that "our stockholders will benefit from." Hartenstein will remain publisher of The Times.
BUSINESS
November 14, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Shareholders approved a deal to allow Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. to acquire rival XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. for about $5 billion.
BUSINESS
June 30, 2002
The Recording Industry Assn. of America never fails to amaze ["Net Radio, Labels at Odds Over Royalties," June 24]. Their actions are like those of tin-pot dictators, destroying their country in a desperate attempt to preserve their empire. The underlying stupidity of their efforts and the unseemly influence and control that they have purchased politically have never been so well evidenced as in the current battle over Internet copyright royalties. They are literally fighting to shut down a phenomenon that allows many artists (a good percentage of whom they manage)
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