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BUSINESS
September 5, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
FDA Panel Seeks More Time for Drug Studies: A panel of experts concluded that a genetically engineered drug designed to treat an often-fatal blood infection is safe, but declined to recommend approval for sale without more research. The panel, made up of outside experts who advise the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, wants more time to study the effectiveness of a drug called Centoxin developed by Centocor Inc., of Malvern, Pa.
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BUSINESS
September 9, 2003 | From Reuters
An experimental drug made by Genentech Inc. and Xoma Ltd. is effective against psoriasis but slightly raises the risk of side effects such as pneumonia or other infections, a U.S. regulatory staff report said. Xoma's shares surged the day before a committee of dermatology experts that advises the Food and Drug Administration was to vote on whether to recommend approval of the drug, called Raptiva, as a new treatment for moderate to severe psoriasis.
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BUSINESS
December 24, 2002 | From Reuters
Genentech Inc. and Xoma Ltd. said they have asked U.S. regulators to approve Raptiva, an experimental treatment for moderate to severe psoriasis. Raptiva, a monoclonal antibody given weekly by injection, reduced psoriasis by at least 75% in some 61% of patients taking it for a year in clinical trials. Biogen Inc. is awaiting approval for its own experimental psoriasis treatment, Amevive. And Johnson & Johnson and Amgen Inc.
BUSINESS
May 13, 2003 | From Associated Press
The biologically engineered drug Raptiva failed to effectively treat rheumatoid arthritis patients in a key experiment, Genentech Inc. and Xoma Ltd. said. The partners said they are halting further tests on patients with the disease, but added that they are hopeful federal regulators will approve Raptiva to treat the skin disorder psoriasis. The psoriasis market, however, is far smaller than the rheumatoid arthritis market. Shares of Berkeley-based Xoma fell 77 cents, or 14%, to $4.72 on Nasdaq.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1997
Xoma Corp. said its Neuprex drug shows no safety problems, according to an analysis of its ongoing trial in patients with a rare and often fatal childhood disease. Berkeley-based Xoma said the results mean it will continue developing Neuprex. The drug is used in pediatric patients with severe meningococcemia, which strikes when the bacteria responsible for the more common meningitis disease invade a patient's bloodstream. Xoma shares fell 6 cents to close at $7.75 on Nasdaq.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2003 | From Reuters
An experimental drug made by Genentech Inc. and Xoma Ltd. is effective against psoriasis but slightly raises the risk of side effects such as pneumonia or other infections, a U.S. regulatory staff report said. Xoma's shares surged the day before a committee of dermatology experts that advises the Food and Drug Administration was to vote on whether to recommend approval of the drug, called Raptiva, as a new treatment for moderate to severe psoriasis.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Biosite Inc., maker of medical diagnostic tests, resolved a licensing dispute with partner Xoma Ltd., which had alleged that Biosite infringed patents. The news sent shares of San Diego-based Biosite up 25%, or $5.22, to $25.77 on Nasdaq. Berkeley-based Xoma rose 36 cents to $5.91, also on Nasdaq. Biosite uses technology licensed from Xoma in manufacturing antibodies for tests to detect drug overdoses and heart disease.
BUSINESS
June 29, 1999 | John O'Dell
Eye-care-products maker Allergan Inc. said it will pay up to $11 million to license a bacteria-fighting protein from biopharmaceuticals maker Xoma Ltd. for use in a family of eye-infection treatments. Xoma, which is based in Berkeley, said Irvine's Allergan will make a series of licensing payments as development and sales goals are reached. Allergan also will pay development costs for future products and royalties from sales of products containing the anti-bacterial protein, which Xoma will manufacture for Allergan.
BUSINESS
May 13, 2003 | From Associated Press
The biologically engineered drug Raptiva failed to effectively treat rheumatoid arthritis patients in a key experiment, Genentech Inc. and Xoma Ltd. said. The partners said they are halting further tests on patients with the disease, but added that they are hopeful federal regulators will approve Raptiva to treat the skin disorder psoriasis. The psoriasis market, however, is far smaller than the rheumatoid arthritis market. Shares of Berkeley-based Xoma fell 77 cents, or 14%, to $4.72 on Nasdaq.
BUSINESS
December 24, 2002 | From Reuters
Genentech Inc. and Xoma Ltd. said they have asked U.S. regulators to approve Raptiva, an experimental treatment for moderate to severe psoriasis. Raptiva, a monoclonal antibody given weekly by injection, reduced psoriasis by at least 75% in some 61% of patients taking it for a year in clinical trials. Biogen Inc. is awaiting approval for its own experimental psoriasis treatment, Amevive. And Johnson & Johnson and Amgen Inc.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Biosite Inc., maker of medical diagnostic tests, resolved a licensing dispute with partner Xoma Ltd., which had alleged that Biosite infringed patents. The news sent shares of San Diego-based Biosite up 25%, or $5.22, to $25.77 on Nasdaq. Berkeley-based Xoma rose 36 cents to $5.91, also on Nasdaq. Biosite uses technology licensed from Xoma in manufacturing antibodies for tests to detect drug overdoses and heart disease.
BUSINESS
June 29, 1999 | John O'Dell
Eye-care-products maker Allergan Inc. said it will pay up to $11 million to license a bacteria-fighting protein from biopharmaceuticals maker Xoma Ltd. for use in a family of eye-infection treatments. Xoma, which is based in Berkeley, said Irvine's Allergan will make a series of licensing payments as development and sales goals are reached. Allergan also will pay development costs for future products and royalties from sales of products containing the anti-bacterial protein, which Xoma will manufacture for Allergan.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1997
Xoma Corp. said its Neuprex drug shows no safety problems, according to an analysis of its ongoing trial in patients with a rare and often fatal childhood disease. Berkeley-based Xoma said the results mean it will continue developing Neuprex. The drug is used in pediatric patients with severe meningococcemia, which strikes when the bacteria responsible for the more common meningitis disease invade a patient's bloodstream. Xoma shares fell 6 cents to close at $7.75 on Nasdaq.
BUSINESS
October 29, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Xoma Patent Upheld: Xoma Corp., a Berkeley biotechnology company, said a U.S. District Court in San Francisco upheld the validity of its patent covering the use of a genetically engineered treatment for septic shock syndrome, a bacterial infection that kills about 70,000 people in the United States annually. In April, 1990, after being granted a U.S. patent for the treatment, Xoma sued Centocor, a rival, alleging that the Malvern, Pa., company was copying its invention.
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