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Xu Wenli

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NEWS
December 21, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Underscoring the government's resolve to crush dissent, a Chinese court today sentenced a prominent dissident to 13 years in prison, accusing him of trying to subvert state power by organizing an opposition party, a human rights group said. Xu Wenli's lawyer informed the Hong Kong-based Information Center for Human Rights and Democratic Movement in China about the harsh sentence, said the center's director, Lu Siqing.
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NATIONAL
December 31, 2002 | From Reuters
Enjoying his first tastes of Western freedom with a holiday visit here, prominent Chinese dissident Xu Wenli said Monday that his release last week from prison felt like a holiday celebration of his own. "It's like the Big Apple dropping in my heart," he said in Times Square, a day before the traditional Big Apple ball was set to drop tonight. China freed Xu, 59, on Dec. 24, when he left a Beijing prison boarded a flight to the U.S. with his wife, He Xintong, 55.
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NATIONAL
December 31, 2002 | From Reuters
Enjoying his first tastes of Western freedom with a holiday visit here, prominent Chinese dissident Xu Wenli said Monday that his release last week from prison felt like a holiday celebration of his own. "It's like the Big Apple dropping in my heart," he said in Times Square, a day before the traditional Big Apple ball was set to drop tonight. China freed Xu, 59, on Dec. 24, when he left a Beijing prison boarded a flight to the U.S. with his wife, He Xintong, 55.
NATIONAL
December 26, 2002 | From Associated Press
A Chinese democracy activist who was released from jail and flown to the United States is overjoyed by his new freedom but awed by the task of starting his life over at 59, his daughter said Wednesday. Xu Wenli, freed after four years in a Chinese prison, spent the day catching up with his family and sleeping off jet lag after arriving in New York, said his daughter, Xu Jin. "It's overwhelmingly joyful," the daughter said. "There are just a lot of emotions, and it's going to be hard.
WORLD
December 25, 2002 | Anthony Kuhn, Times Staff Writer
After years of lobbying by the U.S. and other governments, Chinese authorities freed one of the nation's most famous dissidents from prison Tuesday and sent the democracy activist into de facto exile in the United States. The release of Xu Wenli highlights Beijing's desire for stable ties with Washington and the growing influence of Chinese diplomats who see such paroles as instrumental in achieving that goal, analysts said. Xu, once known to his jailers as Special Prisoner No.
NEWS
June 4, 2000 | GEORGE ESPER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Xu Jin was 8 when the police came to the family home in Beijing at midnight to take her father away. She woke up and asked him what was going on. "Nothing," he said. "Just go back to sleep." That was in 1981. Now she's a 27-year-old student at Boston University. And her dad, Xu Wenli, is still a prisoner. He went to prison for 12 years for advocating democracy, which China's Communist government called subversion.
NATIONAL
December 26, 2002 | From Associated Press
A Chinese democracy activist who was released from jail and flown to the United States is overjoyed by his new freedom but awed by the task of starting his life over at 59, his daughter said Wednesday. Xu Wenli, freed after four years in a Chinese prison, spent the day catching up with his family and sleeping off jet lag after arriving in New York, said his daughter, Xu Jin. "It's overwhelmingly joyful," the daughter said. "There are just a lot of emotions, and it's going to be hard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2001 | BEI LING
The night before I was to be released from a Beijing prison in August 2000, I had a conversation with a high official in the Beijing Public Security Bureau that I will never forget. Tall, thin and well-educated, this officer had overseen the cases of many dissidents before me. For 10 hours, we sparred in a room clogged with our own cigarette smoke. Then the officer turned friendly. He told me I was to be released, to be returned to the United States the next day.
NEWS
May 26, 1993 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a gesture clearly aimed at influencing debate over China policy in Washington, one of China's longest-serving political prisoners was released today after serving 12 years of a 15-year sentence. Xu Wenli, 49, a former electrician and editor who was one of China's most prominent pro-democracy activists in the early 1980s, was released from Beijing No. 1 prison and driven to his home, where he embraced his wife and spoke briefly with reporters.
NEWS
November 13, 1988 | From Reuters
A prominent Chinese political prisoner has been kept in solitary confinement for seven years and refuses to confess in full his "counterrevolutionary crimes," the prison's warden said. "Xu Wenli is here but you cannot see him," Col. Xing Zhonghe said Friday in a rare interview after guards gave reporters a guided tour of Beijing's No. 1 Prison. The prison is home to 2,000 long-term criminals and more than 30 political prisoners. "Xu committed counterrevolutionary crimes," said Xing.
WORLD
December 25, 2002 | Anthony Kuhn, Times Staff Writer
After years of lobbying by the U.S. and other governments, Chinese authorities freed one of the nation's most famous dissidents from prison Tuesday and sent the democracy activist into de facto exile in the United States. The release of Xu Wenli highlights Beijing's desire for stable ties with Washington and the growing influence of Chinese diplomats who see such paroles as instrumental in achieving that goal, analysts said. Xu, once known to his jailers as Special Prisoner No.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2001 | BEI LING
The night before I was to be released from a Beijing prison in August 2000, I had a conversation with a high official in the Beijing Public Security Bureau that I will never forget. Tall, thin and well-educated, this officer had overseen the cases of many dissidents before me. For 10 hours, we sparred in a room clogged with our own cigarette smoke. Then the officer turned friendly. He told me I was to be released, to be returned to the United States the next day.
NEWS
June 4, 2000 | GEORGE ESPER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Xu Jin was 8 when the police came to the family home in Beijing at midnight to take her father away. She woke up and asked him what was going on. "Nothing," he said. "Just go back to sleep." That was in 1981. Now she's a 27-year-old student at Boston University. And her dad, Xu Wenli, is still a prisoner. He went to prison for 12 years for advocating democracy, which China's Communist government called subversion.
NEWS
December 21, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Underscoring the government's resolve to crush dissent, a Chinese court today sentenced a prominent dissident to 13 years in prison, accusing him of trying to subvert state power by organizing an opposition party, a human rights group said. Xu Wenli's lawyer informed the Hong Kong-based Information Center for Human Rights and Democratic Movement in China about the harsh sentence, said the center's director, Lu Siqing.
NEWS
April 9, 1994 | From The Washington Post
Chinese police detained a veteran pro-democracy activist Friday as visiting French Prime Minister Edouard Balladur called for improved economic ties with China but refrained from commenting on Beijing's human rights situation. Police detained Xu Wenli at his Beijing home early Thursday, interrogated him overnight and took him into custody again Friday five minutes after he was released, his wife told reporters.
NEWS
May 26, 1993 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a gesture clearly aimed at influencing debate over China policy in Washington, one of China's longest-serving political prisoners was released today after serving 12 years of a 15-year sentence. Xu Wenli, 49, a former electrician and editor who was one of China's most prominent pro-democracy activists in the early 1980s, was released from Beijing No. 1 prison and driven to his home, where he embraced his wife and spoke briefly with reporters.
NEWS
April 9, 1994 | From The Washington Post
Chinese police detained a veteran pro-democracy activist Friday as visiting French Prime Minister Edouard Balladur called for improved economic ties with China but refrained from commenting on Beijing's human rights situation. Police detained Xu Wenli at his Beijing home early Thursday, interrogated him overnight and took him into custody again Friday five minutes after he was released, his wife told reporters.
NEWS
January 1, 1989 | Associated Press
In poignant letters from prison, one of China's best-known dissidents sent his wife kisses and advised his sickly daughter to get more sun and exercise. "Did you have a happy birthday?" Xu Wenli wrote his daughter in one of five letters obtained by the Associated Press recently. In another, he wrote gleefully, "I had a great weekend because I got six letters." Xu's letters, dated since April and sent to his family in Beijing from the city's No.
NEWS
January 1, 1989 | Associated Press
In poignant letters from prison, one of China's best-known dissidents sent his wife kisses and advised his sickly daughter to get more sun and exercise. "Did you have a happy birthday?" Xu Wenli wrote his daughter in one of five letters obtained by the Associated Press recently. In another, he wrote gleefully, "I had a great weekend because I got six letters." Xu's letters, dated since April and sent to his family in Beijing from the city's No.
NEWS
November 13, 1988 | From Reuters
A prominent Chinese political prisoner has been kept in solitary confinement for seven years and refuses to confess in full his "counterrevolutionary crimes," the prison's warden said. "Xu Wenli is here but you cannot see him," Col. Xing Zhonghe said Friday in a rare interview after guards gave reporters a guided tour of Beijing's No. 1 Prison. The prison is home to 2,000 long-term criminals and more than 30 political prisoners. "Xu committed counterrevolutionary crimes," said Xing.
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