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Y Combinator

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BUSINESS
September 16, 2012 | By Tim Bradshaw
When history comes to assess the present era of Silicon Valley, several chapters will be dedicated to Y Combinator. A start-up investment and training program masterminded by former entrepreneur Paul Graham, Y Combinator appeared at just the right moment: in 2005, when social media were emerging, the cost of launching an Internet company was falling and investors' appetite for risk was returning. In 2000, Randall Stross, a New York Times columnist and business professor at San Jose State University, published "eBoys," an account of Benchmark Capital, one of the first signature investments firms of the dot-com boom.
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BUSINESS
November 10, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
John R. "Trip" Adler III The gig: Adler, 29, is a founder and chief executive of Scribd, a YouTube for publishing in which anyone can upload documents and let others read and share them. With 80 million visitors a month, it's a popular destination. And at 6½ years of age, it turns a profit from displaying ads and taking a cut of sales and subscriptions. Book deal: Last month Scribd struck a deal with publisher HarperCollins to make thousands of book titles available by subscription on its service.
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BUSINESS
January 11, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
A survey released this week found that there were more teens and young adults who said they use Tumblr on a regular basis than those who said they use Facebook. Fifty-nine percent of respondents between the ages of 13 and 25 said they use Tumblr regularly; 54% said they use Facebook on a regular basis. Among those 13 to 18, the percentage who said they use Tumblr regularly was even higher -- 61% compared with 55% who said they use Facebook regularly. The survey was conducted by Y Combinator start-up Survata.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
A survey released this week found that there were more teens and young adults who said they use Tumblr on a regular basis than those who said they use Facebook. Fifty-nine percent of respondents between the ages of 13 and 25 said they use Tumblr regularly; 54% said they use Facebook on a regular basis. Among those 13 to 18, the percentage who said they use Tumblr regularly was even higher -- 61% compared with 55% who said they use Facebook regularly. The survey was conducted by Y Combinator start-up Survata.
BUSINESS
November 10, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
John R. "Trip" Adler III The gig: Adler, 29, is a founder and chief executive of Scribd, a YouTube for publishing in which anyone can upload documents and let others read and share them. With 80 million visitors a month, it's a popular destination. And at 6½ years of age, it turns a profit from displaying ads and taking a cut of sales and subscriptions. Book deal: Last month Scribd struck a deal with publisher HarperCollins to make thousands of book titles available by subscription on its service.
BUSINESS
May 31, 2012 | By Andrea Chang
Grubwithus, a Venice-based social dining network that hosts restaurant dinners for strangers, has received a $5-million round of funding led by GRP Partners. Users of Grubwithus -- known as "grubbers" -- connect through the website and sign up to attend dinners at local restaurants, where they meet people with similar interests or backgrounds. Dinners in the L.A. area have been organized for music lovers, people who are new to the area, Westside entrepreneurs and downtown dwellers, among others.
BUSINESS
December 29, 2010 | Nathaniel Popper, Los Angeles Times
Alexis Ohanian's company, Reddit, was based in New York four years ago when it decided to follow the yellow chip road to Northern California. "New York didn't feel like a place where things were happening," Ohanian said. "There weren't a lot of people having conversations about start-ups, frankly. " But this year, Ohanian headed back east. New York now has a hot Internet scene. There are marquee start-ups such as social networking service FourSquare and fashion website Gilt.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2012 | By Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
Tim Sae Koo had an idea for a tech start-up, but the first-time entrepreneur had no idea what to do next. In January, at the advice of a friend he joined the inaugural class of tech accelerator StartEngine, hoping to turn his vision for Hypemarks - a website at which users create collections of their favorite links - into a bona fide business. Within three months Koo launched the website, and is now talking to a local investor about a substantial investment in the company.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2012 | By Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
Not too long ago, friending someone involved more than just clicking a button on Facebook. So in a retro twist to social networking, a wave of Web start-ups are encouraging users to get off their couches, away from their smartphones and tablets, and back into the real world. "We have an internal tagline: Use the Internet to get off the Internet," said Kathryn Fink, community manager at Meetup, an online-to-offline start-up with 11 million members. Hybrid social networks are connecting strangers with similar interests online, then directing them to meet in person for dinners, bar-hopping, bowling or biking excursions.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
Four years ago, Drew Houston was just another super-smart hacker with ambitions of starting his own company. He'd strap on headphones to block out everything but the endorphin rush as he cranked code late into the night on a new service that instantly syncs all of your files on all of your devices. Houston, who played guitar in a '90s rock cover band at Boston bars and college parties, dubbed it "Even Flow" after one of his favorite Pearl Jam songs. On a white board in his Cambridge, Mass., apartment, he calculated that he'd need several hundred users to "not feel like an idiot" quitting his $85,000-a-year job as a software engineer.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2012 | By Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
Not too long ago, friending someone involved more than just clicking a button on Facebook. So in a retro twist to social networking, a wave of Web start-ups are encouraging users to get off their couches, away from their smartphones and tablets, and back into the real world. "We have an internal tagline: Use the Internet to get off the Internet," said Kathryn Fink, community manager at Meetup, an online-to-offline start-up with 11 million members. Hybrid social networks are connecting strangers with similar interests online, then directing them to meet in person for dinners, bar-hopping, bowling or biking excursions.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2012 | By Tim Bradshaw
When history comes to assess the present era of Silicon Valley, several chapters will be dedicated to Y Combinator. A start-up investment and training program masterminded by former entrepreneur Paul Graham, Y Combinator appeared at just the right moment: in 2005, when social media were emerging, the cost of launching an Internet company was falling and investors' appetite for risk was returning. In 2000, Randall Stross, a New York Times columnist and business professor at San Jose State University, published "eBoys," an account of Benchmark Capital, one of the first signature investments firms of the dot-com boom.
BUSINESS
May 31, 2012 | By Andrea Chang
Grubwithus, a Venice-based social dining network that hosts restaurant dinners for strangers, has received a $5-million round of funding led by GRP Partners. Users of Grubwithus -- known as "grubbers" -- connect through the website and sign up to attend dinners at local restaurants, where they meet people with similar interests or backgrounds. Dinners in the L.A. area have been organized for music lovers, people who are new to the area, Westside entrepreneurs and downtown dwellers, among others.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2012 | By Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
Tim Sae Koo had an idea for a tech start-up, but the first-time entrepreneur had no idea what to do next. In January, at the advice of a friend he joined the inaugural class of tech accelerator StartEngine, hoping to turn his vision for Hypemarks - a website at which users create collections of their favorite links - into a bona fide business. Within three months Koo launched the website, and is now talking to a local investor about a substantial investment in the company.
BUSINESS
December 29, 2010 | Nathaniel Popper, Los Angeles Times
Alexis Ohanian's company, Reddit, was based in New York four years ago when it decided to follow the yellow chip road to Northern California. "New York didn't feel like a place where things were happening," Ohanian said. "There weren't a lot of people having conversations about start-ups, frankly. " But this year, Ohanian headed back east. New York now has a hot Internet scene. There are marquee start-ups such as social networking service FourSquare and fashion website Gilt.
BUSINESS
May 26, 2008 | Jessica Guynn, Times Staff Writer
You're still in your 20s and you've already netted two blockbuster successes. What do you do next? Give others a shot at an Internet fortune. Jawed Karim, who lucked out as co-founder of YouTube Inc. and an early employee of PayPal Inc., is taking part in a unique Silicon Valley tradition: helping the next generation of entrepreneurs with cash, counsel and connections. Despite netting $65 million in Google Inc.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn
Bravo's reality television series "Silicon Valley: Start-ups" has been getting a bad rap for how unreal it is. There may be nothing more unreal than the real life of cast member Dwight Crow. Crow -- who made quite the impression in the first episode, which aired Monday night, by ripping sheets off someone's bed for a toga and drunkenly debating obscure algorithms -- is a brainy 26-year-old "brogrammer" with a degrees in chemical biology and computer science who lets Bravo's cameras follow him around as he tries to rev up his startup.
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