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NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter
There's no question young adult literature has become a cultural juggernaut, with the genre increasingly becoming a feeding ground for movie studios and more adults buying young-adult books than the intended teen audience. Whether it's sci-fi or dystopian, historical or realistic fiction, the field is burgeoning. In celebration, the Los Angeles Public Library is launching YAy for YA! , a mini-convention for young-adult literature scheduled to coincide with Teen Read Week next week.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
As the popularity of "The Hunger Games" franchise and the anticipation of the release of "Divergent" can attest, dystopic young-adult stories are all the rage these days, on screen and on the page. Now the first trailer has been released for a big-screen adaptation of one of the genre's seminal books, "The Giver. " Based on Lois Lowry's Newbury-winning novel and directed by Phillip Noyce, "The Giver" is set in a future society free from pain, suffering and conflict but also characterized by conformity and an utter lack of feeling.
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NEWS
September 20, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter
Whether it's underwater or embattled by a plague, protected by celebrity guardian angels or inhabited by Angelenos implanted with computer chips, the Los Angeles of the future is a vastly different city than it is today -- at least it is in the young-adult novels of four local authors. Marie Lu ("Legend"), Lissa Price ("Starters"), Jennifer Bosworth ("Struck") and Scott Speer ("Immortal City") will all be discussing, and showing the trailers for, their books at L.A. Sizzles , a forum for dystopian-L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Ransom Riggs and Tahereh Mafi spend their days in Santa Monica, sitting side by side at a shared desk in identical chairs in their backyard office, wearing headphones, working at their laptops. Across a cool green expanse sits their Spanish-style house, hidden behind a vine-covered wall. "I really loved books about secret worlds, like 'The Secret Garden' and the 'Bridge to Terabithia,' " says Riggs, whose young adult novel "Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children" was a bestseller in 2011.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
"Ender's Game" may not be the best-executed adaptation in the history of moviedom. But it's based on a major bestseller and a longtime fan favorite, so by all rights it should have made a boatload of money instead of eking out $28 million on its first weekend and going quietly into that dystopian night. It's hardly alone, of course. Why the young-adult boom has gone bust has been a hot topic  in development circles in recent weeks. There are rarely the kind of feeding frenzies in Hollywood of the kind that followed the first "Harry Potter" movies (and, to a somewhat lesser extent, the first “Twilight” movie)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2003 | Robert Hilburn, Times Staff Writer
Heads, it's OutKast's wacky and wonderful "Hey Ya!" Tails, it's the White Stripes' powerful and mysterious "Seven Nation Army." However the coin falls, you can't lose in picking one of those smash singles to top our annual New Year's Eve countdown of the most compelling singles of the year. The playful "Hey Ya!" and the defiant "Seven Nation Army" are excellent records, radiating with the immediate punch that radio programmers crave when putting together playlists, and both records received enormous airplay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1992
Yo, Hillary! If ya' can't stand the heat, get back in the kitchen. C. MONROE FOX Bellflower
BOOKS
March 31, 1991
I enjoyed seeing Craig Cotter's "at the bar" in the Feb. 10 Book Review. His poem is offered in homage to William Carlos Williams, whose own "At the Bar" follows: Hi, open up a dozen. Wha'cha tryin' to do charge ya batteries? Make it two. Easy Girl! You'll blow a fuse if ya keep that up. JACK MILES, CLAREMONT
SPORTS
October 12, 1996
Hey, Robbie! Got a good one for ya. My neighbor comes by, says he caught his 8-year-old watching baseball last Friday. He tried to switch channels to "Court TV," "Geraldo" or "Bay Watch," something with good family values, but when he did the kid spit in his face! Whoa! Don't ya love it? Kid says he got it from you. Wonder why it took so many years for you star millionaires finally to think of a cool way to handle those bitter, blue-collar umpires, especially ones who have lost a kid to a fatal disease.
OPINION
February 2, 2003
To those voters for the Green Party's Ralph Nader who stoutly and self-righteously declared that there was no difference between a vote for Al Gore and a vote for George W. Bush in 2000, I have one question: Are ya gettin' the difference now? Nancy Aspaturian Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Mindy Kaling has slammed the lid down on the brouhaha surrounding her Elle magazine cover, one of four shots featuring different ladies for the mag's Women in TV Issue. And she's done it by being funny, which makes it even better.  "I love my @ELLEmagazine cover," Kaling wrote Tuesday on Twitter. "It made me feel glamorous & cool. And if anyone wants to see more of my body, go on thirteen dates with me. " PHOTOS: 50 most beautiful female celebrities "More of my body" refers to the heart of the controversy: "The Mindy Project" star, 34, was the only one of the four to be cropped in tighter, so that the shot showed mainly her face and not her bod. Another "controversial" point: Kaling, who's of Indian descent, is the group's only woman of color, and the only one not shown in color.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik and Amy Kaufman
When the receipts are tallied for "The Hunger Games: Catching Fire," heroine Katniss Everdeen and her famed arrows will likely hit a box-office bull's-eye. The film starring Jennifer Lawrence is forecast by some to sell as much as $180 million in tickets for its U.S. debut this weekend, which would be the biggest opening of the year. If it delivers as expected, "Catching Fire" will buck the recent trend in which films based on young adult books have fizzled. In the last 18 months, Hollywood adaptations of "Ender's Game," "Beautiful Creatures," "Mortal Instruments," "The Host" and others have failed to ignite with audiences, scuttling hopes of moneymaking new franchises.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
"Ender's Game" may not be the best-executed adaptation in the history of moviedom. But it's based on a major bestseller and a longtime fan favorite, so by all rights it should have made a boatload of money instead of eking out $28 million on its first weekend and going quietly into that dystopian night. It's hardly alone, of course. Why the young-adult boom has gone bust has been a hot topic  in development circles in recent weeks. There are rarely the kind of feeding frenzies in Hollywood of the kind that followed the first "Harry Potter" movies (and, to a somewhat lesser extent, the first “Twilight” movie)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2013 | By Elisabeth Donnelly
Over the course of five books, A.S. King has established herself as a singular voice in today's young adult literature. She brings vivid life to realistic kids working through raw deals, from the death of a friend in Printz honor winner "Please Ignore Vera Dietz," to a girl coming to terms with her sexuality in the 2012 Los Angeles Times Book Prize winner "Ask the Passengers. " (Her pirate-flavored debut, "The Dust of 100 Dogs," is an exception, yet it establishes the magical realism that colors her work.)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2013 | By Amy Benfer
Those thoroughly satiated with beach days and summer blonds can seek refuge of a darker sort in two new novels for young adults in which classic 19th century Gothic novels get a postmodern, post-punk makeover influenced by the aesthetic of their 20th century pop culture counterpart, Gothic rock. Australian poet and fantasy novelist Alison Croggon starts her novel "Black Spring" with the plot skeleton of Emily Brontë's "Wuthering Heights," then grafts on witches, wizards and a little contemporary feminist theory.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2013 | By Louis Bayard
When it came out in 2003, David Levithan's young-adult debut, "Boy Meets Boy," had the pinkish glow of wish fulfillment. Its gay-teen hero found love in a small-town utopia where parents embraced children's differences, jocks treated queers as peers, and a cross-dressing high school quarterback could double as head cheerleader. So much peace, love and understanding - at a time when homosexuality was illegal in 14 states, when "Don't ask, don't tell" and the Defense of Marriage Act were the laws of the land, and the murder of Matthew Shepard was fresh in memory.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1989
Composer John Green, who died May 15, used to tell the story that he met a girl he was trying to impress. "Let's go to George Gershwin's place," he suggested. "You know George Gershwin?" she asked. "Sure, I know George." Gershwin was playing the piano when they walked in. George looked up, saw Johnny and said, "Hi ya, Brown." BILL DANNIES Palos Verdes
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2010
More than 300 authors will read and present at the West Hollywood Book Fair, one of the preeminent publishing events on the West Coast. It'll cover fiction, poetry, graphic novels, science fiction, mystery and YA with guests including new memoirists Sarah Silverman and Molly Ringwald. West Hollywood Park, 647 San Vicente Blvd., West Hollywood. 10 a.m. Sunday. Free. http://www.westhollywoodbookfair.org.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
"If I Ever Get Out of Here," Eric Gansworth's first novel for young people, rings true with a sophisticated look at what it's like to be an outsider and what it takes to be a true friend. Lewis Blake has precious little going for him in school; he's smart, sure. But he's super skinny, essentially friendless, his family is dirt poor, and he's from the "rez" in an area that routinely treats his Tuscarora Reservation community with disdain - or worse. The friendship part starts to change with the arrival at school of George, an Air Force kid. Lewis and George share the same experiences many adolescent pals do: eagerness to learn about girls, sneaked beers, campouts.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2013 | By Elisabeth Donnelly
Judging by the movies she'll be starring in this fall, actress Shailene Woodley has great taste in young adult books. She was at Comic-Con last week to talk about Summit Entertainment's upcoming adaptation "Divergent," Veronica Roth's dystopian young adult series. Woodley joined actor Theo James, director Neil Burger, and writer Veronica Roth (who wrote a diary about her experience for Hero Complex) at Hall H to screen footage and answer questions. Summit, which developed Stephenie Meyer's "Twilight" saga into a record-breaking phenomenon, are clearly hoping for another, potentially "Hunger Games"-sized hit, driven by the young adult audience that has flocked to book-to-big-screen adaptations.
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