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NEWS
October 16, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Korycin. Sidra. Dabrowa. Kuznica. Odelsk. Kolizaka. Krynki. Goniadz. Trzcianne. The list is almost a gazetteer for Poland before World War II. Occasionally, there is a bigger name--Warszawa (Warsaw), Czestochowa, Krakow--but mostly these are the small towns and villages that dotted the map of prewar Central Europe. Together, they were home to 3.5 million Polish Jews, only half a million of whom survived the war and the Nazi death camps.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2010 | By Edmund Sanders
Most people skip the little art gallery at Israel's Holocaust museum Yad Vashem because they think it will be too depressing. After an emotionally draining tour through a maze of testimonies and artifacts, few have the stamina to look at so-called Holocaust Art, which seems to promise only more dark images of death and destruction: skeletal shapes emerging from smokestacks, hollowed eyes looking through barbed wire, piles of emaciated corpses....
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1999 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than most people, Roman Rakover is aware of the hole, torn by the Nazis, in the fabric of every European Jewish family. A dozen years ago, the Calabasas man sat down to compile a genealogy of the Rakover family and to write its history. It took five years and resulted in a book that traces 13 generations of the family from Rakover's great-great-great-great-great-great-grandfather and two of his brothers, down to 81-year-old Rakover, his many cousins and their children.
NATIONAL
April 10, 2010 | By Manya A. Brachear
Zak Kolar hails from a fortunate Jewish family of four whose ancestors never confronted the horrors of the Holocaust. But the teenager from Naperville, Ill., also is among the last generation to encounter World War II's witnesses as neighbors rather than statistics. Seeking to ensure that the Jewish people don't forget the 6 million individual lives lost, Zak, 14, has launched a website and database dedicated to those who perished during the Holocaust. He hopes the online roster of names and death dates will enable members of the Jewish community to select and pray for a martyr on the anniversary of his or her death, as prescribed by Jewish tradition for families in regard to their forebears.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2005 | Laura King, Times Staff Writer
Nearly 63 years later, the words still burn forth from the yellowed, fragile scrap of cardboard-like paper on which they were written in the greatest of haste, yet somehow miraculously preserved. "My darlings! I am on a train," Esther Frankel, a Polish Jew who was born Esther Horonchik, wrote to her family in Paris in August 1942 as she was being deported to Auschwitz.
WORLD
January 25, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Israel's Holocaust memorial institution launched an Arabic version of its website, with vivid photos of Nazi atrocities and video of survivors' testimony, to combat Holocaust denial in the Arab and Muslim world. Among those featured on the Yad Vashem site is Dina Beitler, a survivor of the Nazi genocide that killed 6 million Jews in World War II. Beitler, who was shot and left for dead in 1941, tells her story on the site, with Arabic subtitles. "Holocaust denial in various countries exists, and so it is important that people see us, the Holocaust survivors, that they'll listen to our testimonies, and learn the legacy of the Holocaust -- also in Arabic," Beitler, 73, said at Yad Vashem.
NEWS
January 17, 1995
Thousands of Israeli survivors of Auschwitz, the most notorious Nazi death camp, are expected to gather in Jerusalem Sunday to mark the 50th anniversary of the liberation of the camp in southern Poland. Hosted by Yad Vashem, the Israeli Holocaust Memorial in Jerusalem, 3,000 to 4,000 survivors are expected to attend the gathering in a Jerusalem convention center. Survivors will inscribe their names and the numbers the Nazis tattooed on their arms in a commemorative book.
WORLD
June 11, 2002 | From Reuters
JERUSALEM -- Israel's first astronaut, who lost relatives to Nazi death camps, will blast into orbit with a picture of the moon drawn by a Jewish child killed in World War II, the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial here announced Monday. Ilan Ramon, a colonel in the Israeli air force, will be launched July 19 aboard the space shuttle Columbia, taking with him "Moon Landscape," a drawing by 14-year-old Peter Ginz, who died in the Auschwitz death camp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1988 | KATHERINE M. GRIFFIN, Times Staff Writer
During the darkest days of the Holocaust, Dr. Laszlo Petrovicz was a steady beacon of light for Jews in Budapest. As a Hungarian army doctor assigned to a Jewish labor colony, he helped dozens of captives escape under the guise of sending them to medical specialists. He and his Jewish wife, Zsuszanna, a nurse, provided food and medical care to Jews in Budapest's ghetto. They obtained false identification papers for many and hid others in their own home, written testimonies from survivors say.
NEWS
March 22, 2000 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before he was arrested and carted off to his death at the Auschwitz concentration camp, Belgian artist Carol Deutsch painted 99 scenes from the Bible, a birthday gift for his 2-year-old daughter. On Thursday, copies of 10 of those paintings will be presented to Pope John Paul II when he makes a much-anticipated visit to Israel's Yad Vashem Holocaust museum, a hillside memorial that is both chilling and poignant in its homage to the 6 million Jews killed in World War II.
WORLD
May 12, 2009 | Richard Boudreaux
Pope Benedict XVI, trying to quell Jewish anger over a Holocaust-denying bishop, bowed in silence Monday at Israel's memorial to Jews exterminated during World War II and declared that their suffering must "never be denied, belittled or forgotten." "They lost their lives, but they will never lose their names," the Roman Catholic leader said in a quivering voice before clasping the hands of six Holocaust survivors at a haunting ceremony in the Hall of Remembrance.
WORLD
January 25, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Israel's Holocaust memorial institution launched an Arabic version of its website, with vivid photos of Nazi atrocities and video of survivors' testimony, to combat Holocaust denial in the Arab and Muslim world. Among those featured on the Yad Vashem site is Dina Beitler, a survivor of the Nazi genocide that killed 6 million Jews in World War II. Beitler, who was shot and left for dead in 1941, tells her story on the site, with Arabic subtitles. "Holocaust denial in various countries exists, and so it is important that people see us, the Holocaust survivors, that they'll listen to our testimonies, and learn the legacy of the Holocaust -- also in Arabic," Beitler, 73, said at Yad Vashem.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2005 | Laura King, Times Staff Writer
Nearly 63 years later, the words still burn forth from the yellowed, fragile scrap of cardboard-like paper on which they were written in the greatest of haste, yet somehow miraculously preserved. "My darlings! I am on a train," Esther Frankel, a Polish Jew who was born Esther Horonchik, wrote to her family in Paris in August 1942 as she was being deported to Auschwitz.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 2004 | Peter Nicholas, Times Staff Writer
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, whose father fought on the side of the Nazis in the Second World War, bent down in his black yarmulke and laid a wreath atop a stone slab covering the ashes of Holocaust victims, as part of a somber tribute Sunday to a hilltop complex devoted to the memory of 6 million slain Jews.
OPINION
August 18, 2003 | Walter Reich
U.S. officials want Palestinian Prime Minister Mahmoud Abbas to visit a Holocaust museum. They have the right idea but the wrong museum. The museum they have in mind is in Washington. The one to which he should go is in Jerusalem. Abbas wrote a book that distorted, denied or minimized core facts of Holocaust history.
WORLD
June 11, 2002 | From Reuters
JERUSALEM -- Israel's first astronaut, who lost relatives to Nazi death camps, will blast into orbit with a picture of the moon drawn by a Jewish child killed in World War II, the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial here announced Monday. Ilan Ramon, a colonel in the Israeli air force, will be launched July 19 aboard the space shuttle Columbia, taking with him "Moon Landscape," a drawing by 14-year-old Peter Ginz, who died in the Auschwitz death camp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1995 | From Religion News Service
It has been 50 years since the Nazi death camps were liberated, and Rabbi Yakov R. Hilsenrath is worried that time is running out to memorialize the unidentified Jews who died in them. Only about half the 6 million Jews believed to have been killed in the Holocaust are listed by name in the Yad Vashem museum in Jerusalem. Now, the New Jersey rabbi is searching for information on the remaining 3 million before memories of families and friends fade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1999 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than most people, Roman Rakover is aware of the hole, torn by the Nazis, in the fabric of every European Jewish family. A dozen years ago, the Calabasas man sat down to compile a genealogy of the Rakover family and to write its history. The project took him five years and resulted in a book that traces 13 generations of the family, from Rakover's great- great-great-great-great-great- grandfather and two of his brothers, down to 81-year-old Rakover, his many cousins and their children.
MAGAZINE
November 18, 2001 | KATHERINE MADER
As a little girl I was prohibited from wearing black boots: They reminded Dad of the Nazis and gave him nightmares about Lea. He never spoke of his older sister, and I learned not to ask him about the aunt I would never meet, to accept the mystery that we had "family who disappeared in the war." With every passing year, my curiosity grew. Dad died in 1980 without saying much about Lea.
NEWS
March 24, 2000 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their faces were creased, their hair, what was left of it, gray. They gazed across a dark and drafty Hall of Remembrance and remembered a history of hate and death. In front of them sat Pope John Paul II, a man as old as they were, emotionally sharing their horror. Shmuel Spector remembered. He thought of his childhood in a Polish town and how the Catholics ordered him to avert his eyes when the Corpus Christi parade honoring the Christian Eucharist passed by.
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