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Yad Vashem

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March 22, 2000 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before he was arrested and carted off to his death at the Auschwitz concentration camp, Belgian artist Carol Deutsch painted 99 scenes from the Bible, a birthday gift for his 2-year-old daughter. On Thursday, copies of 10 of those paintings will be presented to Pope John Paul II when he makes a much-anticipated visit to Israel's Yad Vashem Holocaust museum, a hillside memorial that is both chilling and poignant in its homage to the 6 million Jews killed in World War II.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1999 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than most people, Roman Rakover is aware of the hole, torn by the Nazis, in the fabric of every European Jewish family. A dozen years ago, the Calabasas man sat down to compile a genealogy of the Rakover family and to write its history. The project took him five years and resulted in a book that traces 13 generations of the family, from Rakover's great- great-great-great-great-great- grandfather and two of his brothers, down to 81-year-old Rakover, his many cousins and their children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1999 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than most people, Roman Rakover is aware of the hole, torn by the Nazis, in the fabric of every European Jewish family. A dozen years ago, the Calabasas man sat down to compile a genealogy of the Rakover family and to write its history. It took five years and resulted in a book that traces 13 generations of the family from Rakover's great-great-great-great-great-great-grandfather and two of his brothers, down to 81-year-old Rakover, his many cousins and their children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1995 | From Religion News Service
It has been 50 years since the Nazi death camps were liberated, and Rabbi Yakov R. Hilsenrath is worried that time is running out to memorialize the unidentified Jews who died in them. Only about half the 6 million Jews believed to have been killed in the Holocaust are listed by name in the Yad Vashem museum in Jerusalem. Now, the New Jersey rabbi is searching for information on the remaining 3 million before memories of families and friends fade.
NEWS
January 17, 1995
Thousands of Israeli survivors of Auschwitz, the most notorious Nazi death camp, are expected to gather in Jerusalem Sunday to mark the 50th anniversary of the liberation of the camp in southern Poland. Hosted by Yad Vashem, the Israeli Holocaust Memorial in Jerusalem, 3,000 to 4,000 survivors are expected to attend the gathering in a Jerusalem convention center. Survivors will inscribe their names and the numbers the Nazis tattooed on their arms in a commemorative book.
NEWS
October 16, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Korycin. Sidra. Dabrowa. Kuznica. Odelsk. Kolizaka. Krynki. Goniadz. Trzcianne. The list is almost a gazetteer for Poland before World War II. Occasionally, there is a bigger name--Warszawa (Warsaw), Czestochowa, Krakow--but mostly these are the small towns and villages that dotted the map of prewar Central Europe. Together, they were home to 3.5 million Polish Jews, only half a million of whom survived the war and the Nazi death camps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1989 | Compiled by Times researcher Cecilia Rasmussen
Mayor Tom Bradley's overseas travel schedule from 1983 to present: 1983 DATE: Jan. 7-13 WHERE: Zimbabwe, London REASON: African-American Conference EXPENSES PAID BY: City General Funds, $396.15; African American Institute, $3,257 1985 DATE: Oct. 2-14 WHERE: Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Peru REASON: Business development EXPENSES PAID BY: City Harbor Dept., $5,122 DATE: Nov. 8-13 WHERE: Tel Aviv REASON: Los Angeles business delegation EXPENSES PAID BY: Bar-Ilan University, $7,000 (est.) DATE: Nov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1988 | KATHERINE M. GRIFFIN, Times Staff Writer
During the darkest days of the Holocaust, Dr. Laszlo Petrovicz was a steady beacon of light for Jews in Budapest. As a Hungarian army doctor assigned to a Jewish labor colony, he helped dozens of captives escape under the guise of sending them to medical specialists. He and his Jewish wife, Zsuszanna, a nurse, provided food and medical care to Jews in Budapest's ghetto. They obtained false identification papers for many and hid others in their own home, written testimonies from survivors say.
NEWS
August 29, 1986 | MANFRED WOLF, Wolf lives in San Francisco. and
When World War II ended, I was 10 years old. Before me lay the promise of adolescence; behind me was a horror so vast and incalculable that it warded off all comprehension. If I thought about the war at all during my adolescence, it was with a kind of nameless shame. We Jews had been the victims of an unprecedented massacre, and our powerlessness was almost obscene. True, there was cause for pride in my immediate family's escape from Occupied Europe.
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