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Yakama Nation

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NATIONAL
December 21, 2013 | By Maria L. La Ganga
TOPPENISH, Wash. - The Yakama Nation sits in the fertile heart of illegal marijuana country - Washington state's answer to Mendocino County, minus the tie-dye. The soil is rich. The growing season is long. And one of the biggest illegal pot grows in state history was seized here on sacred forested acres where the tribe hunts and gathers food in the shadow of Mt. Adams, also known as Pahto. A year has passed since Washington voters legalized recreational marijuana use. State officials are poised to issue licenses to grow, process and sell what once was contraband.
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NATIONAL
December 21, 2013 | By Maria L. La Ganga
TOPPENISH, Wash. - The Yakama Nation sits in the fertile heart of illegal marijuana country - Washington state's answer to Mendocino County, minus the tie-dye. The soil is rich. The growing season is long. And one of the biggest illegal pot grows in state history was seized here on sacred forested acres where the tribe hunts and gathers food in the shadow of Mt. Adams, also known as Pahto. A year has passed since Washington voters legalized recreational marijuana use. State officials are poised to issue licenses to grow, process and sell what once was contraband.
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NEWS
April 8, 2000 | From Associated Press
It's a decision that tribal officials felt they had to make. The Yakama Nation has decided to go dry, a first step toward addressing alcohol problems on the sprawling Washington reservation. Some say the move was necessary to send a message about the ills of alcohol. But opponents fear that the ban could shut down businesses, cause a decline in tourism and increase unemployment, with non-Indians boycotting tribal interests such as the Legends Casino.
NEWS
October 10, 2000 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an aggressive exercise of Native American political jurisdiction, the powerful Yakama Nation in central Washington state has adopted a comprehensive alcohol ban that threatens to shut down taverns and liquor stores in three towns inside the reservation--where non-Indian residents have vowed a fight.
NEWS
October 10, 2000 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an aggressive exercise of Native American political jurisdiction, the powerful Yakama Nation in central Washington state has adopted a comprehensive alcohol ban that threatens to shut down taverns and liquor stores in three towns inside the reservation--where non-Indian residents have vowed a fight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2001 | LINDA ASHTON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A rare challenge is under way for the right to operate two hydropower dams on the Columbia River, just upstream of prime salmon-spawning habitat in the Hanford Reach. Investor-owned PacifiCorp, which does business in Washington as Pacific Power, has teamed with the Yakama Nation Indians, hoping to take over the Priest Rapids and Wanapum dams. The Grant County Public Utility District, which built the dams nearly half a century ago, won't give them up without a fight.
NEWS
February 17, 2001 | From Associated Press
Indian tribes have reached an agreement with the states of Oregon and Washington on developing an ambitious salmon conservation plan to rebuild fish runs to more than 5 million in the Columbia River Basin within the next 25 years. "The agreement is a milestone in that it marks the first time we have had a coast-wide, conservation-based approach to wild salmon management," Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Director Jeff Koenings said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1999 | LINDA ASHTON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For hundreds of years, the eerily grinning visage of Tsagiglalal has kept watch over the Columbia River. She is a Northwest mystery. No one is certain who painted her or why. Yet she is a powerful force, even in modern times, evidenced by the thousands who come to gaze upon her rust-red image and perhaps also by those who stay away, considering her too sacred to look upon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2000 | LINDA ASHTON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A pair of helicopter cowboys will round up dozens of elk at the Hanford nuclear reservation on Monday for truck transport to the Selkirk and Blue mountains on the easternmost side of the state. The fertile, healthy herd has been trampling fragile desert vegetation and dining on nearby crops, annoying farmers and ranchers and costing the state money in damage claims.
NEWS
August 27, 2000 | From Associated Press
As wildfires continue to rage and firefighting resources are strained across the West, Washington state is calling out the troops. Gov. Gary Locke called up 530 National Guard members Friday to help fight a 110,000-acre brush fire that has raced across parched sagebrush in southern Washington. "We need to move quickly so we don't have the multiple wildfires that states such as Montana and Idaho are facing," the Democratic governor said.
NEWS
April 8, 2000 | From Associated Press
It's a decision that tribal officials felt they had to make. The Yakama Nation has decided to go dry, a first step toward addressing alcohol problems on the sprawling Washington reservation. Some say the move was necessary to send a message about the ills of alcohol. But opponents fear that the ban could shut down businesses, cause a decline in tourism and increase unemployment, with non-Indians boycotting tribal interests such as the Legends Casino.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1997 | BOB BAUM, ASSOCIATED PRESS
On the bluffs overlooking the Columbia River four decades ago, a group of American Indians gathered in sorrow to watch Celilo Falls disappear. "They stood up on the hillside for three days," recalls Bill Yallup of the Yakama Indian Nation. "Some of them sang songs like a funeral. They were very sacred songs. Three days and nights with no sleep. It was a sad day for them."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2002 | LINDA ASHTON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
If the Black Rock reservoir ever gets built, Dick Prigmore says his little way-station out in the middle of nowhere will be buried under 700 feet of dirt. "I don't think I'll be alive by the time this thing is going to happen," says the 64-year-old owner of the Silver Dollar cafe-tavern-convenience store, which stands alone at the intersection of Washington 24 and 241.
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