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May 22, 2003 | Thomas S. Mulligan and Ken Ellingwood, Times Staff Writers
A blast believed to have been caused by an explosive device damaged two rooms at Yale Law School on Wednesday but caused no injuries, authorities said. The explosion, which occurred about 4:40 p.m. Eastern time, toppled a wall shared by a classroom and an adjacent lounge but did little other damage to the law school building, which like the rest of campus was largely deserted, according to New Haven Mayor John DeStefano Jr. and Yale officials.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2013 | By Anthony York
SACRAMENTO -- Gov. Jerry Brown expressed hope on Tuesday that negotiations ordered by a federal court could lead to a resolution of the state's prison crisis. "I'm reasonably optimistic that we will come to agreement on something we can make work," Brown said, noting that he had met with the court-appointed moderator and that his senior staff has spoken to plaintiffs' attorneys who have long argued the state's prisons are illegally over capacity and that the healthcare is so bad that it violates prisoners' constitutional rights.
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NEWS
October 9, 1993 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They remember him as a wild-haired, garrulous guy who bragged about his home state's watermelons and glided through school seemingly without trying--or, sometimes, showing up for class. Bill Clinton always "had a tremendous learning curve," remembered Mark I. Soler. "It was a good thing, because he wasn't the most diligent student."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Alongside our heaps of reality television personalities, Kardashian-style celebrities and teenage pop stars, the United States is poised to get something it sorely needs: a public intellectual. Ronan Farrow has the celebrity background. He's the son of Mia Farrow and Woody Allen -- or so it was thought until earlier this month, when his mother coyly hinted to Vanity Fair that his father might be Frank Sinatra . Either way, he's clearly got celebrity lineage. But he's also got intellectual chops.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1988 | Associated Press
The dean of Yale Law School has resigned from an all-male club in New York following criticism from students. Guido Calabresi said he had remained a member of the Century Club in order to prod it to admit women but decided to quit because his membership had become a public matter and an embarrassment to others.
NATIONAL
September 20, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Yale Law School will end its policy of not working with military recruiters following a court ruling this week that jeopardized about $300 million in federal funding, school officials said Wednesday. Yale and other universities had objected to the Pentagon's "don't ask, don't tell" policy that allows gay men and women to serve in the military only if they keep their sexual orientation to themselves.
NATIONAL
January 5, 2013 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - As dean of Yale Law School, Harold Hongju Koh was among the fiercest critics of President George W. Bush's "war on terror," arguing that his administration had trampled the Constitution and tarnished America's international standing by claiming the power to capture "enemy combatants" abroad and hold them without charges at the prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The next administration must "restore the rule of law in the national security arena," end "excessive government secrecy" and set aside the "claims of unfettered executive power," Koh told a House panel in 2008.
NEWS
January 15, 2013 | By Michael McGough
Not since "Garbo Talks!" has a public figure's decision to speak attracted such attention. I'm referring, of course, to the media sensation created this week when Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas broke an almost seven-year-long silent streak to crack a joke during oral arguments in a case involving the adequacy of counsel in a Louisiana murder case. As The Times' David Savage reported, most of what Thomas said was drowned out by cross-talk, but apparently he had some fun with the idea that one of the lawyers in the case should be considered qualified because she attended Yale Law School, Thomas' alma mater but an institution about which he has mixed feelings.
NATIONAL
January 14, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - It's a slow news day at the U.S. Supreme Court when the biggest story is whether an overheard, offhand comment by Justice Clarence Thomas means he has broken his nearly seven-year streak of silence. Thomas has never liked asking questions during the court's oral arguments. He insists the justices should listen, rather than interrupt the advocates. He last asked a question on Feb. 22, 2006, and his silent streak has taken on a legendary significance. But Thomas is not entirely quiet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1993 | From Associated Press
In the fractious world of religion and politics, where the soul of a nation is often portrayed as hanging on the thread of a single issue such as abortion or school prayer, a calm voice of compromise is emerging. The herald of a mutually respectful approach to defining the boundaries of church and state is Yale Law School professor Stephen Carter, a soft-spoken, self-described liberal who rejects the notion that religion should be excluded from the body politic.
NEWS
May 2, 2013 | By Tom Zoellner and Sam Kleiner
A number of commenters on the online version of our April 28 Op-Ed,  "A better way to track a bomber," argue against the use of taggants to trace explosives because the suspects in the Boston bombings, the Tsarnaev brothers, were identified through other means -- namely the publicizing of videotape from the scene and the flood of resulting tips. That's certainly true. However, taggants at the scene might have brought about a quicker and cleaner investigation, and perhaps avoided the death of one law enforcement officer and a city held hostage.
NEWS
January 15, 2013 | By Michael McGough
Not since "Garbo Talks!" has a public figure's decision to speak attracted such attention. I'm referring, of course, to the media sensation created this week when Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas broke an almost seven-year-long silent streak to crack a joke during oral arguments in a case involving the adequacy of counsel in a Louisiana murder case. As The Times' David Savage reported, most of what Thomas said was drowned out by cross-talk, but apparently he had some fun with the idea that one of the lawyers in the case should be considered qualified because she attended Yale Law School, Thomas' alma mater but an institution about which he has mixed feelings.
NATIONAL
January 14, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - It's a slow news day at the U.S. Supreme Court when the biggest story is whether an overheard, offhand comment by Justice Clarence Thomas means he has broken his nearly seven-year streak of silence. Thomas has never liked asking questions during the court's oral arguments. He insists the justices should listen, rather than interrupt the advocates. He last asked a question on Feb. 22, 2006, and his silent streak has taken on a legendary significance. But Thomas is not entirely quiet.
NATIONAL
January 5, 2013 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - As dean of Yale Law School, Harold Hongju Koh was among the fiercest critics of President George W. Bush's "war on terror," arguing that his administration had trampled the Constitution and tarnished America's international standing by claiming the power to capture "enemy combatants" abroad and hold them without charges at the prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The next administration must "restore the rule of law in the national security arena," end "excessive government secrecy" and set aside the "claims of unfettered executive power," Koh told a House panel in 2008.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
William L. Taylor didn't necessarily look the part of a leading civil rights advocate, a matter he addressed in his memoir under the heading "A White Guy Like Me," as in: "What leads a white guy like me to spend his life working on behalf of black people?" Growing up Jewish in Brooklyn while the Holocaust raged in Europe helped shape his future, he wrote. Another early lesson in civil rights came from following the "career and courage" of Jackie Robinson as he broke major league baseball's color line in 1947.
NATIONAL
May 28, 2009 | James Oliphant and Andrew Zajac
The early White House story line on Sonia Sotomayor emphasizes her pragmatism and a cautious, measured approach to the law developed over a years-long climb from exceedingly modest circumstances to becoming the first Latino nominee to the Supreme Court. But an incident in the fall of 1978 illustrates another side of Sotomayor. Then a daring and assertive Yale University law student, she took a stand against a white-shoe Washington law firm that could have jeopardized her career.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2001
Re "Using Our Fears to Justify a Power Grab," Commentary, Nov. 29: Jack Balkin accuses the U.S. government of using the terrorism crisis as a paranoiac excuse to grab more power. He advocates less power for our government to deal with a terrorist threat under conditions that are unique in our times. As we read, more of Balkin's mind-set comes to light. He mentions that our immigration laws are arbitrary and highhanded. He alludes to a so-called "war on noncitizens." Being a professor of anything should qualify Balkin to differentiate between the heartfelt efforts of our government officials to preserve our security amid difficult circumstances and his paranoid assessment of them.
NEWS
June 27, 1986 | United Press International
Pat Robertson, head of the influential Christian Broadcasting Network and potential candidate for the GOP presidential nomination, said today that Supreme Court rulings are "not the law of the land." Moreover, Robertson, a major leader of the powerful Religious Right faction within the Republican Party, said that while he felt obligated to obey the laws of the United States and all 50 states, "I am not bound by any case or court to which I myself am not a party."
NATIONAL
May 27, 2009 | James Oliphant
For a teenager from a Puerto Rican family struggling upward from the public housing projects of the Bronx, Princeton University in 1972 was a foreign land. "I felt isolated from all I had ever known," she said later, and the low grade she got on one of her first papers drove home the point -- sending her flying to get remedial help. Four years later, Sonia Maria Sotomayor won the Pyne Prize, the highest honor awarded a Princeton undergraduate.
OPINION
April 9, 2009 | Lawrence Rosenthal, Lawrence Rosenthal is a professor of law at Chapman University School of Law in Orange.
John Yoo is a professor of law at UC Berkeley. This semester, he is my colleague -- as a visiting professor -- at Chapman University's School of Law. Yoo is also under investigation by the Justice Department's inspector general for his role in producing a number of controversial memorandums during his service in the department during the Bush administration. The memos include one stating that the president may authorize the torture of suspected terrorists. I am a former federal prosecutor.
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