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April 12, 1989
The Navy issued a public denial stating it had never received any medical evidence suggesting sailors who served aboard nuclear missile submarines were more likely to contract cancer. Responding to a report Monday in the trade publication Navy News and Undersea Technology alleging increased risk, the Navy released a 140-page statistical study by the Yale School of Medicine that tracked both the in-service and post-service death rates for nuclear submariners. The study, conducted at a cost of $600,000, was originally completed in August, 1985, and then updated and revised in April, 1987.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2014 | By Hillel Italie
Mary Cheever, an accomplished author and poet best known as the enduring spouse and widow of John Cheever, has died, after surviving by decades a husband who used their lonely but lasting marriage as an inspiration for some of his most memorable stories. She was 95. She had been battling pneumonia and died Monday night at her colonial-style manor in Ossining, N.Y., her daughter, Susan Cheever , said. The home served as a well-publicized backdrop to John Cheever's facade as the gentleman scribe of "The Swimmer" and "The Five-Forty-Eight.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2014 | By Hillel Italie
Mary Cheever, an accomplished author and poet best known as the enduring spouse and widow of John Cheever, has died, after surviving by decades a husband who used their lonely but lasting marriage as an inspiration for some of his most memorable stories. She was 95. She had been battling pneumonia and died Monday night at her colonial-style manor in Ossining, N.Y., her daughter, Susan Cheever , said. The home served as a well-publicized backdrop to John Cheever's facade as the gentleman scribe of "The Swimmer" and "The Five-Forty-Eight.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2014 | By Nardine Saad
We'll definitely be seeing more of Oscar winner Lupita Nyong'o, but perhaps less on the big screen and more at the local beauty counter and in TV ads: The "12 Years a Slave" star has been named the latest Lancôme cosmetics "ambassadress. " "I am truly honored to join the Maison Lancôme, a brand with such a prestigious history and that I have always loved," the 31-year-old said in a statement. "I am particularly proud to represent its unique vision for  women and the idea that beauty should not be dictated, but should instead be an expression of a woman's freedom to be herself.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2013 | By Susan King
One in a series of occasional articles about the lives and careers of character actors in Hollywood. Fred Melamed's timing has always been a bit askew. Melamed didn't marry until he was 42. He didn't become the father of twin boys until he was 47. And he didn't get his first substantial movie role until he was 53, in Joel and Ethan Coen's 2009 "A Serious Man. " But Melamed, who was a voice-over superstar for 20 years, has been making up for lost time since he delighted critics and audiences with his villainous turn as the Machiavellian Sy Ableman in the Coens' dark comedy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1986 | BILL BILLITER, Times Staff Writer
J. Hillis Miller, a literary critic whose work has been praised as brilliant but denounced by some as deliberately obscure, will leave Yale University to join UC Irvine on July 1, University of California President David Gardner announced Friday. The appointment is considered an academic coup for UCI, said Murray Krieger, who began UCI's critical theory program. "It is a terrible loss for Yale but an absolute breakthrough for Irvine," said Krieger, who was instrumental in recruiting Miller.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
For anyone in Hollywood or the heartland who didn't fall in love with Lupita Nyong'o's talent after seeing her performance in best picture winner “12 Years a Slave,” or was somehow unmoved by the supporting actress's heartfelt acceptance speech Sunday night -- which will stand as one of Oscar's most memorable moments -- here are a few things to keep in mind when thinking about what comes next.  In the wake of Nyong'o's Oscar win, there exists...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2014 | By Nardine Saad
We'll definitely be seeing more of Oscar winner Lupita Nyong'o, but perhaps less on the big screen and more at the local beauty counter and in TV ads: The "12 Years a Slave" star has been named the latest Lancôme cosmetics "ambassadress. " "I am truly honored to join the Maison Lancôme, a brand with such a prestigious history and that I have always loved," the 31-year-old said in a statement. "I am particularly proud to represent its unique vision for  women and the idea that beauty should not be dictated, but should instead be an expression of a woman's freedom to be herself.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
A year ago, Raymond J. Barry submitted his play "Once in Doubt" to the Los Angeles Theatre Center--and it was rejected. "They thought the non-sequitur scenes like me jumping on the light-bulb glass saying, 'I wish something exciting would happen,' wouldn't work," says the Obie-winning actor. "The literary critic wrote a scathing review." Undeterred, Barry bowed the play last January at the Cast Theatre, followed by a summer run at the People's Light in Pennsylvania. Suddenly, the show was hot.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By David Ng
Before her movie breakout role in "The Deer Hunter" in 1978, for which she received her first of 17 (and counting) Oscar nominations, Meryl Streep was a hard-working New York stage actress who appeared in productions both on Broadway and at some of the city's most prestigious nonprofit theater companies. She performed in Central Park numerous times as part of the New York Shakespeare Festival. She sang in an off-Broadway musical production of "Alice at the Palace. " She paid her dues in plays by Chekhov, Brecht and Arthur Miller.  In April, Streep will be recognized for her contributions to stage acting with the 14th Monte Cristo Award, presented by the Eugene O'Neill Theater Center, which is located in Connecticut.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
For anyone in Hollywood or the heartland who didn't fall in love with Lupita Nyong'o's talent after seeing her performance in best picture winner “12 Years a Slave,” or was somehow unmoved by the supporting actress's heartfelt acceptance speech Sunday night -- which will stand as one of Oscar's most memorable moments -- here are a few things to keep in mind when thinking about what comes next.  In the wake of Nyong'o's Oscar win, there exists...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman
A thick, unrelenting heat permeated the Louisiana sets of "12 Years a Slave" - 100-degree-plus temperatures so intense they stifled breath. The moment a scene wrapped, cast and crew would take refuge in air-conditioned cars parked nearby. One member of the ensemble, however, stayed outdoors: Lupita Nyong'o, a 30-year-old newcomer who plays Patsey, the favorite slave of a sadistic plantation master. "In that kind of condition, we all wanted to find even the tiniest comfort we could get," recalled Chiwetel Ejiofor, the lead actor in the movie about a free Northerner who is abducted and sold into slavery in the South.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By David Ng
Before her movie breakout role in "The Deer Hunter" in 1978, for which she received her first of 17 (and counting) Oscar nominations, Meryl Streep was a hard-working New York stage actress who appeared in productions both on Broadway and at some of the city's most prestigious nonprofit theater companies. She performed in Central Park numerous times as part of the New York Shakespeare Festival. She sang in an off-Broadway musical production of "Alice at the Palace. " She paid her dues in plays by Chekhov, Brecht and Arthur Miller.  In April, Streep will be recognized for her contributions to stage acting with the 14th Monte Cristo Award, presented by the Eugene O'Neill Theater Center, which is located in Connecticut.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Theater Critic
Stanley Kauffmann, who died Wednesday at 97, will be remembered for his intellectually rigorous, neatly manicured film reviews -- the meditative yin to Pauline Kael's ecstatic yang. But as a drama critic, I'm especially grateful for his equally acute body of drama criticism, which is a tonic to read in this age of trumped-up enthusiasms and attention-grabbing pans. “Persons of the Drama,” one of Kauffmann's collections of theater criticism, can usually be found in a pile on my desk with anthologies of theater reviews by his friends and colleagues Robert Brustein, Gordon Rogoff and the late Richard Gilman, all of whom taught at the Yale School of Drama and helped (directly and indirectly)
NEWS
October 3, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt
Photographer Chris Mottalini is obsessed with structural ghosts. At the heart of that obsession is architect Paul Rudolph's homes, which Mottalini documented in various stages of demolition over a period of seven years. The images were recently gathered together in a striking book, "After You Left, They Took it Apart. " Mottalini will sign the book at an exhibition of those same photographs on Thursday at the Landing, the gallery space inside the rare furniture gallery Reform.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2013 | By Susan King
One in a series of occasional articles about the lives and careers of character actors in Hollywood. Fred Melamed's timing has always been a bit askew. Melamed didn't marry until he was 42. He didn't become the father of twin boys until he was 47. And he didn't get his first substantial movie role until he was 53, in Joel and Ethan Coen's 2009 "A Serious Man. " But Melamed, who was a voice-over superstar for 20 years, has been making up for lost time since he delighted critics and audiences with his villainous turn as the Machiavellian Sy Ableman in the Coens' dark comedy.
NEWS
October 3, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt
Photographer Chris Mottalini is obsessed with structural ghosts. At the heart of that obsession is architect Paul Rudolph's homes, which Mottalini documented in various stages of demolition over a period of seven years. The images were recently gathered together in a striking book, "After You Left, They Took it Apart. " Mottalini will sign the book at an exhibition of those same photographs on Thursday at the Landing, the gallery space inside the rare furniture gallery Reform.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Women are less likely than men in high-status jobs to be given flexible work schedules to pursue career-development opportunities, according to a recent Yale study. The study , published in the July issue of the Journal of Social Issues, found that managers were more likely to grant men flexible working schedules. Researchers asked managers how they would act if men and women of varying ranks asked for different schedules. The workers represented employees in high-status managerial positions or lower-status hourly positions, researchers said.  Photos: Wall Street rogues: Infamous corporate villains Managers were also told the reason for the schedule change request -- either for childcare or to take professional development courses.  The results were clear: Employers favored giving men more flexible schedules.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Women are less likely than men in high-status jobs to be given flexible work schedules to pursue career-development opportunities, according to a recent Yale study. The study , published in the July issue of the Journal of Social Issues, found that managers were more likely to grant men flexible working schedules. Researchers asked managers how they would act if men and women of varying ranks asked for different schedules. The workers represented employees in high-status managerial positions or lower-status hourly positions, researchers said.  Photos: Wall Street rogues: Infamous corporate villains Managers were also told the reason for the schedule change request -- either for childcare or to take professional development courses.  The results were clear: Employers favored giving men more flexible schedules.
SCIENCE
July 18, 2013 | By Eryn Brown, This post has been updated. See below for details.
Hormone replacement therapy has plummeted among U.S. women since the Women's Health Initiative cut short its Estrogen Plus Progestin Trial in 2002, when study results revealed that women who took the two-hormone therapy suffered adverse effects and higher mortality. But the widespread rejection since of all hormone replacement therapies among menopausal women has been misguided, a team of researchers from the Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Conn., wrote Thursday in the online edition of the American Journal of Public Health .  Looking at a separate group of women than those followed in the 2002 trial - women ages 50 to 59 who had had hysterectomies - Dr. Philip Sarrel and colleagues calculated that rejecting estrogen-only hormone therapy resulted in the early deaths of nearly 50,000 women between 2002 and 2011.
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