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October 2, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
When teenagers engage in dangerous behavior, adults usually chalk it up to some innate fondness for risk - the thrill of an unsafe situation. But in fact, adolescents may be more risk-averse than adults, a new study has found.  Their willingness to engage in risky behavior may have less to do with thrill-seeking per se than with a higher tolerance for uncertain consequences, researchers reported Monday. “Teenagers enter unsafe situations not because they are drawn to dangerous or risky situations, but rather because they aren't informed enough about the odds of the consequences of their actions,” said Agnieszka Tymula, a postdoctoral researcher at New York University and coauthor of a report detailing the study, in a statement.
October 23, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Beyond the fact that it is sensational, the Fountain Theatre's production of "In the Red and Brown Water" by Tarell Alvin McCraney is important for two reasons: It introduces Los Angeles audiences to a dramatic poet in the process of discovering his singular voice and it shows how magnificently one of L.A.'s better small theaters can serve bold new talent. The play, which is part of McCraney's "Brother/Sister" trilogy, brought the 32-year-old African American playwright a good deal of attention when the cycle was produced off-Broadway at the Public Theater in 2009.
On the night of March 4, 1984, Libby Zion, an 18-year-old college student suffering from a high fever and an earache, was brought to New York Hospital by her parents. After eight hours, she was dead. Ten years of bitter litigation later, there is still no clear explanation for what killed the apparently healthy teen-ager.
August 31, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Researchers in New Haven, Conn., said they have confirmed that Type-I diabetes is triggered by the body's immune system turning on delicate cells, and say they have found the cause. The discovery could lead to a vaccine against a disease that affects more than 1 million Americans, said Susan Wong and colleagues of the Yale School of Medicine. Writing in Nature Medicine, Wong's team said they found an antigen in mice bred to develop what looks like human juvenile diabetes.
December 25, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A state judge has spared a Westport home, designed by renowned architect Paul Rudolph, from demolition -- for now. The 4,200-square-foot stucco house, designed by Rudolph in 1972, is an elongated series of interconnecting cubes with cantilevered panels that hang above large windows. Rudolph, who died in 1997, was dean of the Yale School of Architecture in the late 1950s and early 1960s.
October 1, 1995 | Reuters
Jeffrey Garten, the undersecretary of commerce for international trade, has resigned to become dean of the Yale School of Management, the Commerce Department and the university announced. Garten, one of the lead negotiators of the recent U.S. car trade pact with Japan, will start his new job Nov. 1, the school said. Garten, 48, is a former managing director of Shearson Leahman Brothers and the Blackstone Group. He served in the administrations of Presidents Richard Nixon, Gerald R.
January 29, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Lloyd Richards, the outgoing dean of the Yale School of Drama, was inducted into the Theater Hall of Fame in ceremonies at Broadway's Gershwin Theater today as the school announced a nationwide search for his successor. Richards has been in the job since 1979 but now wants more time to pursue other aspects of the theater, including acting.
June 27, 1995
"It would be interesting, if not useful, to consider where one would go in Los Angeles to have an effective revolution. . . . If one took over some public square, some urban open space, who would know? A march on City Hall would be inconclusive. . . . The only hope would seem to be to take over the freeways."--Charles W. Moore, late dean of the Yale School of Architecture
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