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April 10, 1988 | Associated Press
About 100 students demonstrated outside the monthly meeting of the Yale Corporation on Saturday to demand that the university sell stock in corporations doing business with South Africa. As of June, 1987, the Yale Office of Public Information said, the university had invested $213 million in corporations doing business in South Africa.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2014 | By Hillel Italie
Robert A. Dahl, an esteemed and influential political scientist who in such books as "Who Governs?" championed democracy in theory and critiqued it in practice, has died. He was 98. A professor emeritus at Yale University, Dahl died Wednesday at a nursing home in Hamden, Conn., according to his daughter Sara Connor. His career lasted for more than half a century, but he was best known for the 1961 publication "Who Governs?" Cited by the Times Literary Supplement as among the 100 most influential books since World War II, "Who Governs?"
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Police issued arrest warrants on assault charges Monday for two men accused of a New Year's Eve attack on members of an all-male a cappella group from Yale University. Richard Aicardi and Brian Dwyer were charged with assaulting two members of the Baker's Dozen outside a party held in honor of the 16 student singers. Witnesses at the time said the trouble started after the vocalists sang "The Star Spangled Banner."
NATIONAL
January 16, 2014 | By Saba Hamedy
It was supposed to be just like every other annual Harvard-Yale game: a lively, fierce rivalry coupled with students and alumni cheering and tailgating. But on Nov. 19, 2011, one tailgate festivity got out of hand: Brendan Ross, a member of the Yale University chapter of fraternity Sigma Phi Epsilon who was driving a rented U-Haul truck carrying beer kegs, struck and killed Nancy Barry, 30, of Salem, Mass., and injured Yale student Sarah Short and Harvard employee Elizabeth Dernbach.
NEWS
April 4, 1986 | ELAINE KENDALL
Joining the Club: A History of Jews and Yale by Dan A. Oren (Yale University: $29.95) The venerable Yale University Press has itself joined a kind of publishing club by presenting this formidably detailed account of the Jewish experience at Yale as if it were a broad social history, which for all its virtues it is not. Back when such specialized books appeared with titles like "Intolerance and Esteem: Two Centuries of Academic Ambivalence," you knew what to expect.
NATIONAL
May 28, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
News briefs can be cruel. Not because of what they say, but because of what they don't. The Boston Globe ran an item Saturday headlined “ Wayland woman dies in Dennis car crash .”  It was breaking news, but not unusual. The Globe's metro desk regularly runs tragedies in brief: struck pedestrian, fatal motorcycle accident. This one told of Marina Keegan, 22, who died when the car she was riding in drifted off the road, hit a guardrail, veered back over the road and rolled over at least twice.
NEWS
January 5, 1999 | STEVE GRANT, HARTFORD COURANT
Adolf Seilacher was working his way through an unusual exhibit at the Peabody Museum of Natural History in New Haven, Conn., when he stopped in front of something labeled "Shrimp Burrow Jungle." It was a product of science, but there was no scientific name, only the fanciful title and a gracefully textured, upright, 7-foot-by-3-foot cast image of ancient sediments. On display was a tangle of interlocking tunnels left in the sea floor hundreds of millions of years ago by an early form of shrimp.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2013 | By Don Lee
The question seems simple, but shedding light on the answer was worth a Nobel Prize for three American economists: How do we know how much an item is worth? Eugene F. Fama and Lars Peter Hansen of the University of Chicago and Robert J. Shiller of Yale University spent decades working on that problem, separately pioneering two competing views on finance that have strongly influenced the way people save and invest as well as major issues in public policy. Fama, 74, spent a five-decade career in Chicago demonstrating how well free markets can determine the value of stocks, bonds and other assets.
NATIONAL
September 15, 2009 | Geraldine Baum
After the Connecticut medical examiner concluded that a body recovered from a Yale University research lab was that of graduate student Annie Le, friends, colleagues and students who didn't know her tried to come to terms Monday with her brutal death. Le's body was found Sunday, the day she was to marry a Columbia University graduate student. The 24-year-old doctoral student in pharmacology had been missing for five days when police found her remains stuffed behind a wall of a lab where she was doing research with animals.
NATIONAL
September 15, 2009 | Maria L. La Ganga and My-Thuan Tran
Annie Le, whose body was found on the day she planned to wed, was mourned Monday by family members and friends from her hometown in the scenic Sierra Nevada foothills as smart and vibrant, kind and funny. The Yale University graduate student of Vietnamese heritage grew up in a remote, hilly area off a twisting, one-lane gravel road with an aunt and uncle she regarded as parents. Her brother remembered her on Facebook as someone who "left this world doing what she loved." "She may be small, but she be fierce," Chris Le wrote of his 24-year-old sister, who was pursuing a degree in pharmacology.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2013 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
The difference between a glove for the left hand and one for the right is obvious to the human eye, even though the two are mirror images of each other. It is an easy task to distinguish between them and separate them from each other. Most biological molecules have similar mirror images, but it can be difficult to distinguish between them and even harder to separate them. Hardest of all is synthesizing only the desired form, because only this form will interact with other biological molecules in the correct fashion.
NATIONAL
December 16, 2013 | By Matt Pearce, This post has been updated to reflect a new development. See note below for details.
A pair of finals-week threats sent shivers through two Boston-area campuses Monday morning, adding to a seemingly ever-growing number of New England universities to face scares over the past two months. Four buildings on Harvard University's campus in Cambridge -- including a freshman dorm and the campus' science center -- were evacuated shortly after 9 a.m. after officials sent out an alert warning of an unconfirmed report of explosives in each facility. No explosions were reported.
NATIONAL
December 16, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Matt Pearce
Alert: Unconfirmed reports of explosives at four sites on campus: Science Center, Thayer, Sever and Emerson. Evacuate those buildings now. Harvard University issued that warning Monday morning, and police swarmed the Cambridge, Mass., campus for several hours. The bomb threat proved false, but Harvard was not alone in seeing its final exams disrupted: That afternoon, the University of Massachusetts Boston evacuated a building after reports of a gunman, which also turned out to be unfounded.
NATIONAL
December 3, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
For the second time in two weeks, a Connecticut university has been put on lockdown after officials received an alert about a possible gunman coming to campus. University of New Haven officials said Tuesday that a suspect was in custody and weapons had been recovered after the campus was told to take shelter in the early afternoon. "EMERGENCY: WHPD has reported an Asian male near South Campus with what appears to be a rifle," the school's official account tweeted. "SHELTER IN PLACE and await further instruction.
NATIONAL
November 25, 2013 | By Benjamin Mueller and Matt Pearce
NEW HAVEN, Conn. -- After the school massacres at Sandy Hook, Virginia Tech and Columbine, this has become, perhaps, the inexorable consequence of any threatening phone call. At Yale University, hours after an anonymous man called and warned a dispatcher that a gunman was headed to the school to "shoot some people," a campus lockdown was lifted Monday afternoon after police scoured the campus room-by-room without finding a would-be killer. There were no reports of shots fired.
NATIONAL
November 25, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
An anonymous caller told police his roommate was headed to Yale University in New Haven, Conn., to shoot people, and witnesses spotted a man with a shotgun or rifle in the area, prompting Monday's campus shutdown, police said. In a phone call that lasted only a few seconds, a male caller told a 911 operator that "his roommate was on his way to the university, to Yale University, to shoot people," said New Haven Police Department spokesman David Hartman in a televised news conference.  No shots or injuries have been reported as police swarmed the Ivy League campus, and Hartman could not confirm any arrests or detentions, nor provide a description of the suspect.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2013 | By DiAngelea Millar
New film school rankings show that New York University is No. 1, producing the most graduates that have participated in the production of quality films. This is the first such study from Ranker.com, a website that collects data and gathers answers to questions like "Who makes the best acoustic guitar?" or "Who is the funniest comedian?" In conducting the rather unscientific study, Ravi Iyer, a data scientist for Ranker.com, sifted through data from freebase.com, which he used to find actors and other film workers and their alma maters.
NATIONAL
January 16, 2014 | By Saba Hamedy
It was supposed to be just like every other annual Harvard-Yale game: a lively, fierce rivalry coupled with students and alumni cheering and tailgating. But on Nov. 19, 2011, one tailgate festivity got out of hand: Brendan Ross, a member of the Yale University chapter of fraternity Sigma Phi Epsilon who was driving a rented U-Haul truck carrying beer kegs, struck and killed Nancy Barry, 30, of Salem, Mass., and injured Yale student Sarah Short and Harvard employee Elizabeth Dernbach.
NATIONAL
November 25, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
A report of a gunman on campus had Yale University hunkered down on alert Monday morning. "Confirmed report of person with a gun on/near Old Campus. SHELTER IN PLACE. This is NOT a test," the university said in its latest alert to the campus community in New Haven, Conn. A university alert said New Haven police were first notified of a report of a gunman by an anonymous phone call from a phone booth. SWAT teams were reportedly sighted at the Ivy League university, which began its November recess Saturday.
NEWS
November 25, 2013 | By Amy Hubbard
An emergency alert has been issued at Yale University after a report of a person with a gun on campus. The community has been told to shelter in place after the anonymous report was called in to New Haven, Conn., police. The alert said there had been no confirmed sighting of a person with a gun, but Yale police are asking "those on campus to remain in their current location until there is additional information. " Officials said a man with a gun was spotted near Old Campus, where many freshmen dorms are located.  The Yale Daily News Twitter account posted that SWAT teams were seen in that area of campus.
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