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Yang Shangkun

NEWS
August 17, 1989 | From Associated Press
Soldiers loyal to China's president detained the defense minister and several commanders in a dispute over a top military post vacated by Zhao Ziyang, the purged Communist Party boss, Chinese sources said today. They said President Yang Shangkun, a central figure in the martial law crackdown, apparently ordered the action to strengthen his control of the Chinese military.
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NEWS
May 19, 1989 | From Associated Press
Following are brief sketches of China's top leaders involved in the current pro-democracy crisis: Deng Xiaoping, 84, is the most powerful leader in China even though the highest ranking position he holds is chairman of the Central Military Commission of the Communist Party. Deng was purged twice during the 1966-76 Cultural Revolution and then staged a comeback that turned China around. He transformed a country dominated by ideological battles into one with pragmatic, market-oriented economic policies.
NEWS
April 8, 1988 | Associated Press
The national legislature today elected China's most powerful general, Yang Shangkun, president in one-candidate balloting that was open for the first time to foreign reporters. Yang's election puts a close ally of senior leader Deng Xiaoping and staunch supporter of Deng's economic reforms in the largely ceremonial but highly visible post. The 84-year-old Deng remains chairman of the Central Military Commission, his only government post.
NEWS
October 17, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight senior Chinese leaders, including the president and defense minister, are stepping down from the Communist Party's ruling Politburo, a Beijing-controlled newspaper reported Friday. The retirements from the 14-member Politburo imply that many of these leaders will also step down from government positions at next spring's National People's Congress, or Parliament.
NEWS
May 13, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
President Bush signed a proclamation declaring today National Day in Support of Freedom and Human Rights in memory of those killed in Communist China last year while demonstrating in support of democracy. The Senate, which harshly criticized Bush for refusing to impose stiff economic and diplomatic measures against China in response to the bloody crackdown, passed a resolution Friday urging the President to sign the proclamation.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senior leader Deng Xiaoping, taking a historic step toward a generational transfer of power, Thursday turned over the leadership of China's armed forces to Communist Party chief Jiang Zemin. But in a related action that virtually guarantees continued tension at the highest levels of Chinese politics, one of Jiang's key rivals, President Yang Shangkun, was confirmed as No. 2 in the military hierarchy.
NEWS
August 26, 1988 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
Prime Minister Noboru Takeshita of Japan and Premier Li Peng of China pledged Thursday to work to bring relations between their countries to new levels of friendship and cooperation. The heads of government in East Asia's two most powerful nations met for nearly 3 1/2 hours Thursday afternoon in a "very friendly and relaxed and warm atmosphere," according to a Japanese official who spoke on the condition that he not be identified. Takeshita committed 810 billion yen (about $6.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1989
During recent weeks, numerous analysts have predicted what will happen in China. When 2 million people marched in Beijing, it was predicted that changes toward democracy were inevitable. When martial law was declared, it was predicted that a dark period would be inevitable. When the 100 military officers opposed martial law, it was predicted that the hard-liners would fall. When 7 of the 8 army divisions supported Premier Li Peng, it was predicted that the hard-liners would take control.
NEWS
May 5, 1990 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mongolian President Punsalmaagiyn Ochirbat arrived here Friday on a trip formally ending nearly three decades of Sino-Mongolian estrangement. In the first round of talks, he and Chinese President Yang Shangkun praised a 1960 Sino-Mongolian treaty of friendship and mutual aid. Yang declared that the signing of that treaty three decades ago showed China's "sincere desire" to develop friendly relations with Mongolia, the official New China News Agency reported.
NEWS
September 28, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korean President Roh Tae Woo arrived here Sunday for a milestone summit between two former foes, raising hopes for greater stability in Northeast Asia and possible progress toward Korean reunification. Bitter enemies during the 1950-53 Korean War, Beijing and Seoul established diplomatic relations just last month.
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