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Yasmina Reza

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2013 | By David Ng
Yasmina Reza, the Tony Award-winning French dramatist whose stage hits include "Art" and "God of Carnage," has a new work out this month but it isn't a play. Reza has published a new novel in France titled "Heureux les Heureux. " The 190-page book follows 18 different characters and is structured as a series of monologues. The title, which can be roughly translated to "Happy Are the Happy," is a quote from Jorge Luis Borges's "Fragments from an Apocryphal Gospel. " The novel has received enthusiastic reviews in France.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Broadway will dim its lights Wednesday to honor James Gandolfini,  the "The Sopranos” star and Tony nominee who died last week at the age of 51. The Broadway League announced Tuesday that theater marquees will go dark for one minute at 8 p.m. Gandolfini, best known for playing New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano on HBO's "The Sopranos,” also starred on stage. In 2009, he earned a best actor Tony nod for his role in Yasmina Reza's comedy "God of Carnage,” which two years later was produced at L.A.'s Ahmanson Theatre.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2009 | David C. Nichols
The phenomenal success of "Art" seems due to its literary flair. Yasmina Reza's existential comedy about a meltdown among three longtime friends after one buys an expensive painting blends behavioral farce with sociological essay. That dichotomy lends "Art" an accessible veneer that has dazzled audiences since its 1994 premiere at the Comedie des Champs-Elysees in Paris. Not long thereafter, "Art" hit the English-speaking world in Christopher Hampton's idiomatic translation, winning an Olivier award and a Tony for best play in 1998.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2013 | By David Ng
James Gandolfini, who died unexpectedly on Wednesday after reportedly suffering a heart attack while in Italy, will forever be remembered for playing the neurotic New Jersey mobster Tony Soprano on HBO's hit series "The Sopranos. " Theater audiences in Los Angeles and New York got a chance to see Gandolfini at his finest in the stage comedy "God of Carnage," by French playwright Yasmina Reza. The actor played one of four Brooklyn parents who come to blows over a playground brawl involving their children.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2012 | By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Bradley Whitford, 52, has shuttled among theater, film and television since his Emmy-winning run on "The West Wing" ended in 2006. He plays one of three men arguing about an abstract painting in the Pasadena Playhouse's revival of "Art," opening Sunday, and stars in the horror film "The Cabin in the Woods," opening in April. Is this your first appearance onstage at your hometown theater? How did this come about? David Lee, a wonderful director, and Sheldon Epps, who runs the theater, asked if I was interested in doing this particular role in this particular play.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
Broadway will dim its lights Wednesday to honor James Gandolfini,  the "The Sopranos” star and Tony nominee who died last week at the age of 51. The Broadway League announced Tuesday that theater marquees will go dark for one minute at 8 p.m. Gandolfini, best known for playing New Jersey mob boss Tony Soprano on HBO's "The Sopranos,” also starred on stage. In 2009, he earned a best actor Tony nod for his role in Yasmina Reza's comedy "God of Carnage,” which two years later was produced at L.A.'s Ahmanson Theatre.
BOOKS
June 8, 2008
The following reviews are scheduled: Thomas McGonigle reviews "Dawn, Dusk or Night: A Year With Nicolas Sarkozy" by Yasmina Reza. Erika Schickel reviews "All We Ever Wanted Was Everything," a novel by Janelle Brown. Tim Rutten reviews "Dinosaurs on the Roof," a novel by David Rabe. Edward Champion reviews "The Reel Stuff," edited by Brian Thomsen and Martin H. Greenberg. Daniel Kurtz-Phelan reviews "Heads in the Sand: How the Republicans Screw Up Foreign Policy and Foreign Policy Screws Up the Democrats" by Matthew Yglesias.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2013 | By David Ng
James Gandolfini, who died unexpectedly on Wednesday after reportedly suffering a heart attack while in Italy, will forever be remembered for playing the neurotic New Jersey mobster Tony Soprano on HBO's hit series "The Sopranos. " Theater audiences in Los Angeles and New York got a chance to see Gandolfini at his finest in the stage comedy "God of Carnage," by French playwright Yasmina Reza. The actor played one of four Brooklyn parents who come to blows over a playground brawl involving their children.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2011 | David Ng, Los Angeles Times
When "God of Carnage," Yasmina Reza's Tony-winning comedy of bad bourgeois behavior, opens at the Ahmanson Theatre on April 13, it will feature the same cast that won near universal acclaim when the play debuted on Broadway in 2009 ? Jeff Daniels, Hope Davis, James Gandolfini and Marcia Gay Harden ? a rare instance in which an entire Broadway ensemble reprises their roles in Los Angeles. For the producers, getting the stars ? literally and figuratively ? to align for a second time was no simple task given four respected actors' professional and personal lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2011 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Yasmina Reza never planned to make a film of her international hit play "God of Carnage," a hair-trigger drama about a playground scuffle between two boys that escalates into a bitingly funny, primal struggle among their parents. But when a longtime friend proposed making a movie, the Paris-based playwright knew exactly the type of director the film needed: a master of macabre humor, an expert at raising the tension inside tight psychological spaces, a connoisseur of the darkest recesses of the human heart.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2013 | By David Ng
Yasmina Reza, the Tony Award-winning French dramatist whose stage hits include "Art" and "God of Carnage," has a new work out this month but it isn't a play. Reza has published a new novel in France titled "Heureux les Heureux. " The 190-page book follows 18 different characters and is structured as a series of monologues. The title, which can be roughly translated to "Happy Are the Happy," is a quote from Jorge Luis Borges's "Fragments from an Apocryphal Gospel. " The novel has received enthusiastic reviews in France.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2012 | By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Bradley Whitford, 52, has shuttled among theater, film and television since his Emmy-winning run on "The West Wing" ended in 2006. He plays one of three men arguing about an abstract painting in the Pasadena Playhouse's revival of "Art," opening Sunday, and stars in the horror film "The Cabin in the Woods," opening in April. Is this your first appearance onstage at your hometown theater? How did this come about? David Lee, a wonderful director, and Sheldon Epps, who runs the theater, asked if I was interested in doing this particular role in this particular play.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
When stage-bound plays become cinematic, expanding them to the broader canvas that film allows is often the order of the day. But not with Roman Polanski and not with "Carnage. " In fact, one of the things that attracted the veteran director to Yasmina Reza's award-winning "God of Carnage" was the chance to make a film in the real time of the excruciating evening two couples — Jodie Foster and John C. Reilly, Kate Winslet and Christoph Waltz — spend in a Brooklyn apartment. So not only is "Carnage" not opened up, it feels even more intensely focused on its quartet of protagonists than the play was. The tight close-ups of cinematographer Pawel Edelman, the way his camera moves within the detailed living space designed by Dean Tavoularis, adds to the let-me-out-of-here claustrophobia of the scenario co-written by Reza and Polanski.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2011 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Yasmina Reza never planned to make a film of her international hit play "God of Carnage," a hair-trigger drama about a playground scuffle between two boys that escalates into a bitingly funny, primal struggle among their parents. But when a longtime friend proposed making a movie, the Paris-based playwright knew exactly the type of director the film needed: a master of macabre humor, an expert at raising the tension inside tight psychological spaces, a connoisseur of the darkest recesses of the human heart.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2011 | David Ng, Los Angeles Times
When "God of Carnage," Yasmina Reza's Tony-winning comedy of bad bourgeois behavior, opens at the Ahmanson Theatre on April 13, it will feature the same cast that won near universal acclaim when the play debuted on Broadway in 2009 ? Jeff Daniels, Hope Davis, James Gandolfini and Marcia Gay Harden ? a rare instance in which an entire Broadway ensemble reprises their roles in Los Angeles. For the producers, getting the stars ? literally and figuratively ? to align for a second time was no simple task given four respected actors' professional and personal lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2009 | David C. Nichols
The phenomenal success of "Art" seems due to its literary flair. Yasmina Reza's existential comedy about a meltdown among three longtime friends after one buys an expensive painting blends behavioral farce with sociological essay. That dichotomy lends "Art" an accessible veneer that has dazzled audiences since its 1994 premiere at the Comedie des Champs-Elysees in Paris. Not long thereafter, "Art" hit the English-speaking world in Christopher Hampton's idiomatic translation, winning an Olivier award and a Tony for best play in 1998.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2000 | LINDA WINER, NEWSDAY
Ever since Yasmina Reza's "The Unexpected Man" opened at the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1998, New York theatergoers have been teased and tantalized by promises to import the two-character encounter by the creator of "Art." In every plan, Eileen Atkins was scheduled to play the Woman, a performance for which this consummate--not to mention irresistible--actress won the Olivier Award.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2008 | Thomas McGonigle, Special to The Times
The most interesting political book to be written in the U.S. in the coming year will be inspired by Yasmina Reza's "Dawn, Dusk or Night," which follows a year in the life of Nicolas Sarkozy as he campaigns for the presidency of France. The as-yet-unwritten tome will follow the last days of the presidency of George W. Bush as he prepares to give up being the most powerful man in the world. Of course, this is probably an impossible literary dream.
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