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Yasser Esam Hamdi

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NEWS
April 6, 2002 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yasser Esam Hamdi, who officials believe may be a second American Taliban fighter, was flown Friday to the United States as the military continued to review whether he was born here and should be handed over to federal law enforcement for prosecution. The 22-year-old was taken under heavy guard from the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to a naval base at Norfolk, Va. Authorities have found a birth certificate that appears to verify his claim that he was born in Baton Rouge, La.
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NEWS
April 6, 2002 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yasser Esam Hamdi, who officials believe may be a second American Taliban fighter, was flown Friday to the United States as the military continued to review whether he was born here and should be handed over to federal law enforcement for prosecution. The 22-year-old was taken under heavy guard from the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to a naval base at Norfolk, Va. Authorities have found a birth certificate that appears to verify his claim that he was born in Baton Rouge, La.
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NATIONAL
August 24, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A U.S.-born man captured in Afghanistan has joined two other men deemed enemy combatants at the brig at the Charleston Naval Weapons Station. Yasser Esam Hamdi was transferred last month to the brig near Hanahan from Norfolk, Va., according to Maj. Michael Shavers. Hamdi, 22, was with Taliban forces when he was captured by U.S. forces in late 2001. He was carrying a rifle and acknowledged loyalty to the Taliban, according to papers filed by the government.
NATIONAL
July 13, 2002 | From Associated Press
A court must reconsider its order allowing a U.S.-born suspected Taliban fighter to meet with his lawyers, because the judge did not adequately address the government's position that the prisoner is an enemy combatant, an appeals court ruled Friday. A three-judge panel of the U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals unanimously overturned U.S. District Judge Robert G. Doumar's ruling that Yasser Esam Hamdi could meet privately with attorneys from the federal public defender's office.
NEWS
April 4, 2002 | RICHARD A. SERRANO and GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The U.S. government may have in its custody a second American who fought for the Taliban in Afghanistan, authorities said Wednesday after checking birth records that appear to support that he was born in Louisiana. The young man, identified by government officials as 22-year-old Yasser Esam Hamdi, was captured after a late November prison uprising at Mazar-i-Sharif, the same site where the military seized John Walker Lindh, a Northern Californian who fought for the Taliban.
NEWS
April 5, 2002 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pentagon officials said Thursday they are all but certain that a 22-year-old detainee from the Afghan war being held in Cuba is a U.S. citizen, and they are considering turning him over to federal law enforcement authorities. The captive, identified as Yasser Esam Hamdi, was seized during a late November prison uprising in Afghanistan, as was John Walker Lindh of Northern California. But while Lindh was readily identified as an American citizen, U.S.
NATIONAL
June 11, 2002 | JOHN HENDREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pentagon plans to hold an alleged Al Qaeda bomb plotter indefinitely without charges despite his U.S. citizenship, citing two World War II court decisions that allowed Americans to be held as prisoners of war or charged in military courts. The Defense Department is holding Jose Padilla, identified Monday as the planner of a radioactive "dirty" bomb attack, as an "intelligence source" for questioning about the Al Qaeda terrorist network, senior Pentagon spokesman Richard McGraw said.
NATIONAL
August 11, 2002 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chief of the Justice Department's criminal division told a lawyers' group Saturday that Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft has gotten "an unfair rap" from civil libertarians and that the Bush administration has been "very balanced and very restrained" in its legal response to the Sept. 11 attacks. "We are in a time of war," Assistant Atty. Gen. Michael Chertoff told a meeting of the American Bar Assn.
OPINION
February 23, 2003 | Louis Fisher, Louis Fisher is author of "American Constitutional Law" (5th edition, 2003) and "Nazi Saboteurs on Trial: A Military Tribunal and American Law," to be published this spring.
Times of war and emergency jeopardize civil liberties. Ironically, it is precisely at such moments, when we most need independent judges to check executive abuse, that judicial safeguards are weakest. Protections must therefore come from outside the courts. That has been the pattern in the past, and it appears, thus far, to be the record after the Sept. 11 terror attacks on New York and the Pentagon.
NATIONAL
June 11, 2002 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, BOB DROGIN and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A onetime Chicago gang member who turned to Islam in a Florida jail allegedly plotted with senior Al Qaeda operatives to detonate a radioactive bomb on American soil, authorities said Monday. Jose Padilla, 31, who also goes by the name Abdullah al Muhajir, was in the early stages of planning an attack in the United States when he was quietly apprehended last month at Chicago O'Hare International Airport after flying from Zurich, Switzerland.
NATIONAL
November 25, 2002 | Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writer
This is where Jose Padilla was first arrested. A short, chubby kid, he was picked up by police for everything from stealing a doughnut to killing a rival gang member. He lived across from his old grade school, where teachers viewed him as "silly and disruptive." Here too is where he stepped off a flight from Pakistan last spring and into the grasp of federal agents on the jetway at O'Hare International Airport.
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