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NEWS
September 12, 2002 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Still at a peak of enthusiasm and camaraderie after a three-week tour of festivals in Lucerne, Edinburgh, London, Brussels and Helsinki, the Los Angeles Philharmonic gave its first home concert Tuesday at the Hollywood Bowl. It was a warm family affair in several ways. Martin Chalifour, the orchestra's principal concertmaster, was the splendid soloist in Bruch's Violin Concerto No. 1.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2004 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
As the Hollywood Bowl season entered its final week Tuesday night, Yasuo Shinozaki made his final appearance as Los Angeles Philharmonic assistant conductor. Having made a good showing with Tchaikovsky's Sixth Symphony in Disney Hall last December, he reinforced that impression outdoors with more Tchaikovsky -- a solid Symphony No. 4.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2004 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
As the Hollywood Bowl season entered its final week Tuesday night, Yasuo Shinozaki made his final appearance as Los Angeles Philharmonic assistant conductor. Having made a good showing with Tchaikovsky's Sixth Symphony in Disney Hall last December, he reinforced that impression outdoors with more Tchaikovsky -- a solid Symphony No. 4.
NEWS
September 12, 2002 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Still at a peak of enthusiasm and camaraderie after a three-week tour of festivals in Lucerne, Edinburgh, London, Brussels and Helsinki, the Los Angeles Philharmonic gave its first home concert Tuesday at the Hollywood Bowl. It was a warm family affair in several ways. Martin Chalifour, the orchestra's principal concertmaster, was the splendid soloist in Bruch's Violin Concerto No. 1.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2002 | CHRIS PASLES
In the middle of an interview, Yasuo Shinozaki hands over typed notes about his programming choices for an upcoming concert at the Hollywood Bowl. When the Los Angeles Philharmonic's assistant conductor talks music, he turns thoughtful and then locks eyes with his listener. When he conducts, the critics say, he minds order and shape. All of which make one thing clear: For Shinozaki, music is in the details.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2002 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever awaiting their big opportunity, assistant conductors of major symphonic organizations must pray for debut chances. For 33-year-old Yasuo Shinozaki, that opportunity came Thursday night, when he deputized for the ill Hans Vonk and led the Los Angeles Philharmonic in a Beethoven program at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2004 | Chris Pasles
Alexander Mickelthwate, assistant conductor of the Atlanta Symphony, has been appointed assistant conductor of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, succeeding Yasuo Shinozaki. Mickelthwate, 33, whose tenure begins in the fall, was selected from eight finalists, narrowed from more than 150 applicants from around the world. He will serve a two-year term. Miguel Harth-Bedoya remains associate conductor.
NEWS
July 18, 2002 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A fresh breeze blew across Cahuenga Pass Tuesday night. It signaled not only the balminess of the Southern California evening, but the exuberance coming off the podium at the Hollywood Bowl, where Yasuo Shinozaki conducted the Los Angeles Philharmonic in a bracing and, until the finale, immaculate performance of Beethoven's "Eroica" Symphony. The familiar piece, for decades one of this orchestra's specialties, sounded new under Shinozaki's earnest, serious and direct approach.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2003 | Chris Pasles
If you feel shut out of the new Walt Disney Concert Hall, take heart. Everything from refrigerator magnets and souvenir programs to tickets to Berlin Philharmonic and Los Angeles Philharmonic concerts has been put up for sale on EBay, the world's largest Web auctioneer. Prices are unpredictable, however. One Oct. 23 gala program booklet recently sold for $77.76, but it did include an authentic piece of confetti that "actually fell from the ceiling at the opening." Another sold for only $66.55.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2004 | Chris Pasles
Miguel Harth-BeDoya, for whom the position of associate conductor of the Los Angeles Philharmonic was created in 1999, will leave that post next month, at the end of the season. He will continue to conduct the orchestra, however. No replacement has been named. "We knew about this two years ago," Harth-Bedoya said last week from Texas, where he serves as music director of the Fort Worth Symphony and lives with his wife, choral director Maritza Caceres, and their 2 1/2-year-old daughter, Elena.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2002 | CHRIS PASLES
In the middle of an interview, Yasuo Shinozaki hands over typed notes about his programming choices for an upcoming concert at the Hollywood Bowl. When the Los Angeles Philharmonic's assistant conductor talks music, he turns thoughtful and then locks eyes with his listener. When he conducts, the critics say, he minds order and shape. All of which make one thing clear: For Shinozaki, music is in the details.
NEWS
September 11, 2003 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
An autumnal and an early vernal masterpiece made surprisingly congenial musical partners Tuesday at the Hollywood Bowl when Los Angeles Philharmonic assistant conductor Yasuo Shinozaki led the orchestra in Mozart's Clarinet Concerto and Mahler's Symphony No. 1. Michele Zukovsky was the eloquent soloist in the Mozart. It helped that the orchestra sounded revitalized after some lackluster performances last week. The sound system was also back on track, delivering richness and detail.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2003 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
To follow the delicate, drifting, East-West flowerings of Toru Takemitsu with the overpowering Russian angst of Tchaikovsky's "Pathetique" Symphony might seem like a shotgun marriage of opposites. Well, yes, it is, but Yasuo Shinozaki, the Los Angeles Philharmonic's gifted assistant conductor, forged an unsuspected link between these two works Friday night at the Walt Disney Concert Hall.
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