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Yayoi Kusama

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September 12, 1997 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At Margo Leavin Gallery, an excellent selection of mostly recent and some earlier works by Yayoi Kusama marries the relentless obsessiveness that often characterizes outsider art to the refinement and sophistication often associated with formalism. Too beautiful to be truly out of control, yet too crazy to be mere aesthetic exercises, the Tokyo-based artist's paintings and sculptures are at once edgy and heavenly.
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October 3, 2012 | By Booth Moore, Fashion Critic
PARIS -- It seemed as if there was a battle of the bigs going on at Paris Fashion Week. New designers at Dior and Yves Saint Laurent grabbed a lot of attention, so Karl Lagerfeld installed wind turbines in the Grand Palais for the Chanel runway show, and Marc Jacobs installed four escalators on the runway for Louis Vuitton. But in the case of Jacobs, there was method to the madness. The escalators were a site-specific installation by French conceptual artist Daniel Buren, known for creating art in public spaces that unites surfaces and architecture.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1998 | Scarlet Cheng, Scarlet Cheng, an occasional contributor to Calendar, writes frequently about the arts and film. She traveled to Tokyo for this article
Artist Yayoi Kusama has alarming eyes--or perhaps they are alarmed. Large and staring, there is an edgy apprehension in them, as if afraid of what she might see. There is also a burning intensity that comes from seeing what she does, which is perhaps too much. As a child, she had hallucinations in which dots would cover everything from floor to ceiling, in which the patterns of violets lept from the kitchen tablecloth and bloomed into the space around her.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1998
I feel compelled to comment on the use of the adjective "silly" in Christopher Knight's review of the Yayoi Kusama retrospective ("Abstraction as Illusion," March 11). I wonder if Knight has ever used the word "silly" to describe the work of a male artist. To me, it gave off a strong whiff of male chauvinism. It also made me question Knight's ability to accurately judge the work of this extraordinary and unique artist. I had hoped, probably foolishly, as we come to the end of the 20th century that art criticism would have progressed beyond the limitations of gender.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1998
I feel compelled to comment on the use of the adjective "silly" in Christopher Knight's review of the Yayoi Kusama retrospective ("Abstraction as Illusion," March 11). I wonder if Knight has ever used the word "silly" to describe the work of a male artist. To me, it gave off a strong whiff of male chauvinism. It also made me question Knight's ability to accurately judge the work of this extraordinary and unique artist. I had hoped, probably foolishly, as we come to the end of the 20th century that art criticism would have progressed beyond the limitations of gender.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Booth Moore, Fashion Critic
PARIS -- It seemed as if there was a battle of the bigs going on at Paris Fashion Week. New designers at Dior and Yves Saint Laurent grabbed a lot of attention, so Karl Lagerfeld installed wind turbines in the Grand Palais for the Chanel runway show, and Marc Jacobs installed four escalators on the runway for Louis Vuitton. But in the case of Jacobs, there was method to the madness. The escalators were a site-specific installation by French conceptual artist Daniel Buren, known for creating art in public spaces that unites surfaces and architecture.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1998 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
In September, the Margo Leavin Gallery in West Hollywood held a show of mostly recent work by 68-year-old Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama, her solo debut in Los Angeles. The paintings were wonderful, the sculptures curious but unconvincing, the mirrored "infinity chamber" silly. On Sunday, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art opened Kusama's first major American museum show, focusing on work she made between 1958 and 1968, the decade Kusama lived in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2006 | From the Associated Press
American composer Steve Reich and Russian ballet star Maya Plisetskaya were among the five winners of the 2006 Praemium Imperiale arts awards for lifetime achievements, announced Thursday. French sculptor Christian Boltanski, German architect Frei Otto and Japanese painter Yayoi Kusama were also named as laureates. Given annually by the Japan Art Assn. in fields not covered by the Nobel Prizes, the awards carry cash prizes of $131,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1998
Between 1958, when Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama arrived in New York, and the late 1960s, when performance began to dominate her art, she created a body of work that made a significant contribution to the contemporary scene. A comprehensive exhibition of works from this period, "Love Forever: Yayoi Kusama, 1958-1968," opens Sunday at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art with paintings, collages, sculptures and reconstructions of three of the artist's environmental installations.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2012 | By David Pagel
When you think about it, paint-by-number sets are the analog version of pixilated images: Each type of representation consists of small, single-color sections that add up to coherent pictures. At David Kordansky Gallery, Jonas Wood's nine big paintings have one foot firmly planted in each of these two media. The combination captivates. From the hobbyist pastime, Wood's oils and acrylics on linen or canvas borrow charm, earnestness, steady, one-step-at-a-time craftsmanship and just the right touch of hokey sentimentality.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1998 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
In September, the Margo Leavin Gallery in West Hollywood held a show of mostly recent work by 68-year-old Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama, her solo debut in Los Angeles. The paintings were wonderful, the sculptures curious but unconvincing, the mirrored "infinity chamber" silly. On Sunday, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art opened Kusama's first major American museum show, focusing on work she made between 1958 and 1968, the decade Kusama lived in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1998 | Scarlet Cheng, Scarlet Cheng, an occasional contributor to Calendar, writes frequently about the arts and film. She traveled to Tokyo for this article
Artist Yayoi Kusama has alarming eyes--or perhaps they are alarmed. Large and staring, there is an edgy apprehension in them, as if afraid of what she might see. There is also a burning intensity that comes from seeing what she does, which is perhaps too much. As a child, she had hallucinations in which dots would cover everything from floor to ceiling, in which the patterns of violets lept from the kitchen tablecloth and bloomed into the space around her.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1997 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At Margo Leavin Gallery, an excellent selection of mostly recent and some earlier works by Yayoi Kusama marries the relentless obsessiveness that often characterizes outsider art to the refinement and sophistication often associated with formalism. Too beautiful to be truly out of control, yet too crazy to be mere aesthetic exercises, the Tokyo-based artist's paintings and sculptures are at once edgy and heavenly.
NEWS
December 3, 2013 | By Susan Denley
Harry Styles of One Direction took home the British Style Award at the British Fashion Awards on Monday in London. The 19-year-old received the award from Alexa Chung, herself the winner for the last three years, and model Jack Guinness. He beat out other nominees including David Beckham, Cara Delevingne and the Duchess of Cambridge for the honor, the only category in the British Fashion Awards that is decided by a vote of the public. [Grazia Daily] Others of the night's winners included Christopher Kane as designer of the year, Christopher Bailey of Burberry as menswear designer of the year, Burberry as designer label of the year and Miuccia Prada as international designer of the year.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2007 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
In a pledge that reinforces a philanthropic tradition, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles has received the promise of a gift of 33 pieces from Clifford Einstein, chair of MOCA's board of trustees, and his wife, Madeline. The donation comprises works made over the last three decades by an international slate of prominent artists, including Kiki Smith, Nam June Paik, Mark Grotjahn, Sigmar Polke, Mike Kelley and Lari Pittman.
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