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Yellowman

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June 26, 1987 | CRAIG LEE
New York-based reggae performer Sister Carol is known as the "Black Cinderella," which might explain why she didn't take the stage Wednesday at the less-than-capacity Music Machine until nearly midnight. Rather than turn into a pumpkin, though, she proved that the increasing participation of women in the often male-dominated Rastafarian music world is a welcome thing, indeed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2005 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
A finalist for the 2002 Pulitzer in drama, Dael Orlandersmith's "Yellowman," now at the Fountain Theatre, is a sweepingly poetical yet down-to-earth drama about the ravages of racial elitism and generational abuse in the Gullah-Geechee culture of South Carolina's Sea Islands. The play commences in the late 1960s, when the burgeoning black pride movement is still just distant thunder to the Gullahs, relegated by race to the lowliest occupations of their isolated rural communities.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1986 | DON SNOWDEN
In a bit of irony, the Jamaican singer who rode to popularity on a rapid-fire, rap-related vocal style has just weathered a bout with a serious affliction of the jaw. Just how serious depends on whom you listen to. Yellowman's record company, Shanachie, says in the bio that accompanies his new "Going to the Chapel" album that he underwent surgery for cancer of the jaw. Yellowman himself has a slightly different medical report.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1995 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Yellowman's life has been a series of challenges. He was born a black albino. A decade ago, he waged battles against throat and skin cancer. And now, having been known more for his prurient lyrics than for his skills as a singer, songwriter and musical trailblazer, he is fighting to change his image. In the early '80s, Yellowman--who performs tonight at the Galaxy in Santa Ana--pioneered the "dance-hall" style, reggae's counterpart to hip-hop.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1995 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Yellowman's life has been a series of challenges. He was born a black albino. A decade ago, he waged battles against throat and skin cancer. And now, having been known more for his prurient lyrics than for his skills as a singer, songwriter and musical trailblazer, he is fighting to change his image. In the early '80s, Yellowman--who performs tonight at the Galaxy in Santa Ana--pioneered the "dance-hall" style, reggae's counterpart to hip-hop.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2005 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
A finalist for the 2002 Pulitzer in drama, Dael Orlandersmith's "Yellowman," now at the Fountain Theatre, is a sweepingly poetical yet down-to-earth drama about the ravages of racial elitism and generational abuse in the Gullah-Geechee culture of South Carolina's Sea Islands. The play commences in the late 1960s, when the burgeoning black pride movement is still just distant thunder to the Gullahs, relegated by race to the lowliest occupations of their isolated rural communities.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2006 | Lynne Heffley
The Beverly Hills/Hollywood NAACP's 16th annual NAACP Theatre Awards, announced Monday, gave a big nod to the Laguna Playhouse. It took producing honors for "Constant Star," which garnered four other awards, including best ensemble cast. Layon Gray ("The Girls of Summer") was the winning producer for smaller theaters. Writing awards went to Thomas Gibbons for "Permanent Collection" and the late August Wilson for "Radio Golf."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1998 | STEVE APPLEFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The legacy of reggae icon Bob Marley is more than his messages about God and freedom. Marley's reputation owes as much to a dynamic musical vision that stretched the limits of his genre. It was that side of Marley's work that was best celebrated Saturday at the 17th annual Bob Marley Day Festival at the Long Beach Arena. There was evidence enough of reggae's musical reach between the sweet soul crooning of Barrington Levy and the high-energy dancehall blends of Sizzla, Yellowman and Capleton.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2008 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
Born in 1950s Oklahoma, Peter Mui says he never felt proud of his ancestry. Afraid of ridicule, his Chinese immigrant father would ask Mui's mother not to speak Mandarin in public so that the family wouldn't stand out. But Mui has turned those childhood memories of prejudice into a $12-million clothing company. With his YellowMan brand, Mui has taken a slur and turned it on its head.
NEWS
August 25, 2005 | F. Kathleen Foley
"Yellowman": A finalist for the 2002 Pulitzer in drama, Dael Orlander- smith's play is a sweepingly poetical yet down-to-earth tale about the ravages of racial elitism and generational abuse in the Gullah-Geechee culture of South Carolina's Sea Islands. The play commences in the late 1960s, when the burgeoning black pride movement is just distant thunder to the Gullahs, relegated by race to the lowliest occupations of their isolated rural communities.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1987 | CRAIG LEE
New York-based reggae performer Sister Carol is known as the "Black Cinderella," which might explain why she didn't take the stage Wednesday at the less-than-capacity Music Machine until nearly midnight. Rather than turn into a pumpkin, though, she proved that the increasing participation of women in the often male-dominated Rastafarian music world is a welcome thing, indeed.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1986 | DON SNOWDEN
In a bit of irony, the Jamaican singer who rode to popularity on a rapid-fire, rap-related vocal style has just weathered a bout with a serious affliction of the jaw. Just how serious depends on whom you listen to. Yellowman's record company, Shanachie, says in the bio that accompanies his new "Going to the Chapel" album that he underwent surgery for cancer of the jaw. Yellowman himself has a slightly different medical report.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1989
The late Andy Kaufman's tribute/parody should have buried the others-as-Elvis shtick forever, so the Orange County Performing Arts Center's (coming) "Elvis: A Musical Celebration," featuring three actor versions of the King, is an unnecessary and puzzling presentation. By digging up the bloated corpse of Elvis while ignoring the vital contributions of living contemporary musicians, the "Arts Center" reveals itself to be nothing but cold concrete anchored in mud. Only an inventive, diverse booking policy recognizing fine talents such as Celia Cruz, John Lee Hooker, Public Enemy, Yellowman, 3 Mustaphas 3, Eddie Palmieri, Kassav, B-H Surfers, Dwight Yoakam, Black Stalin, Flaco Jimenez, Jane's Addiction, Alpha Blondie, Pancho Sanchez, and Beausoleil--to name a few--will bring much-needed credibility (and patrons)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2006 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
"The Drowsy Chaperone," the Broadway-bound musical that had its U.S. premiere at the Ahmanson Theatre in November, led the nominations for the 37th annual Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle Awards, earning eight nods for excellence in categories including production, direction, writing and musical score. Winners of the awards, which honor 2005 theater productions in Los Angeles and Orange counties, will be announced March 13.
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