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Yemen Government

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NEWS
April 1, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
President Ali Abdullah Saleh fired his prime minister and asked Deputy Prime Minister Abdul-Kadir Ba Jammal to form a new government, the sixth since 1990, a presidential statement said. The statement gave no reason for the firing of Abdul-Karim Iryani, who had served nearly three years. But he was seen as unable to accomplish many of Yemen's economic reforms, launched in 1995 with help from the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank.
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WORLD
August 7, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - U.S. intelligence officials long have said that Al Qaeda's affiliate in Yemen had eclipsed the global terrorism network's core leadership in Pakistan as the chief threat to American facilities and interests. Recent events, including the Obama administration's decision to temporarily shutter more than two dozen diplomatic missions around the globe, have brought that claim into stark relief. In the latest developments Wednesday, a suspected U.S. drone strike killed seven more alleged Al Qaeda militants traveling in two cars in southern Yemen, the fifth such attack in less than two weeks.
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NEWS
May 23, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Two countries on the Arabian Peninsula, Yemen and South Yemen, joined Tuesday to become one nation, the Republic of Yemen, an impoverished land sitting on newly discovered oil reserves. Gen. Ali Abdullah Saleh, the president of the unified state, raised the new country's red, white and black flag at noon atop the Presidential Council building at port side. The republic is poor but has recently located oil reserves unofficially put at 2 billion barrels.
WORLD
May 12, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
Yemeni security forces and antigovernment protesters clashed violently again Thursday, as Persian Gulf and U.S. officials pressed for a deal that would allow longtime President Ali Abdullah Saleh to leave office with immunity. Government supporters fired gunshots at protesters, resulting in at least two deaths in the tribal town of Bayda and at least one in the commercial city of Taizz. Scores more protesters were wounded as they attempted to blockade government buildings and enforce a general strike.
NEWS
July 6, 1988
Balloting got under way in Yemen's first general election as more than 1 million voters were expected to choose among 1,200 candidates for seats in a 128-member Parliament. The new Parliament will open later this month with the power to legislate, ratify treaties, elect the president and supervise government machinery. The election is seen by analysts as a milestone in Yemen's commitment to unification with Marxist-ruled South Yemen.
NEWS
December 11, 1987 | From Reuters
President Ali Abdullah Saleh pledged his commitment to democracy Thursday and said he was encouraged by signs of warmer relations with the United States. "Of late there have been very positive signs," he told foreign correspondents.
NEWS
September 15, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
This was to be Yemen's year in the news, its warring halves reunified and oil revenues pulling the Arabian Peninsula's most backward country into the mainstream. Instead, the 14 million Yemenis have become a footnote to the Persian Gulf crisis, the nation that, along with Cuba, cast abstaining votes on U.N. Security Council resolutions aimed at forcing Iraq to cough up Kuwait. Conflict in the gulf has spelled economic disaster.
NEWS
October 16, 2000 | DAVID KELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The suspected suicide bombing of an American destroyer anchored in the Port of Aden has focused world attention on this rugged land where each man carries an average of three weapons and Muslim extremists have found a welcome home. Yemen has figured prominently on the world's roster of terrorist nations for years. The 1998 bombings of the U.S. embassies in Tanzania and Kenya were carried out by a group that included a Yemeni man.
NEWS
October 29, 1990 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost unnoticed by the world last May, the two Yemens ended a generation of ideological and military warfare and merged into a single country that became a significant new power on the Arabian Peninsula.
NEWS
February 21, 1994 | Associated Press
Feuding Yemeni leaders signed a reconciliation agreement Sunday designed to end a six-month leadership crisis and bring about political and economic reforms. In a state ceremony here, Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh and his vice president, Ali Salim Bidh, signed the 32-page document, which also bore the signatures of 39 other Yemeni politicians.
WORLD
March 22, 2011 | By Garrett Therolf, Los Angeles Times
Yemen's political crisis deepened Tuesday as opposition groups rejected an offer by President Ali Abdullah Saleh to negotiate a gradual transfer of power. Under the terms of the offer, Saleh would step down before the end of his term in 2013 but would not immediately relinquish his office, according to a high-ranking government official who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to comment. "He likely wants to stay in power until the end of this year, or really as long as possible, but the concession is an offer to put some timeline on a transfer of power," the official said.
WORLD
February 15, 2011 | By Noah Browning and Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
The continuing wave of unrest sweeping the Middle East led to a fifth day of protests Tuesday in Yemen and thousands of protesters swept into the main square of the capital of Bahrain, setting up tents and vowing to stay until the government agrees to major reforms. In Iran, hard-liners in parliament demanded that opposition leaders be executed for advocating protests that attracted tens of thousands of people. As many as a thousand anti-government protesters marched through the streets of Sana, the Yemeni capital, but it was large numbers of supporters of President Ali Abdullah Saleh who appeared to have the upper hand, gathering in a festival in downtown Tahrir Square with music and nationalist slogans.
WORLD
November 6, 2010 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
They race through mountain passes and across deserts and cities, daggers stuffed in their belts and heavily armed bodyguards at their side, exuding a sense of power that for centuries has defined Yemen's dangerous and cunning political landscape. This nation's tribal leaders, grandiose personalities with often disparate interests, are a key to stability from the sand-swept border with Saudi Arabia to the edges of the Red Sea. They are the men with the potential to break Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula or allow it to flourish, depending on whispered deals, money and territorial gambits.
WORLD
November 6, 2009 | Jeffrey Fleishman
Saudi Arabian warplanes attacked Shiite rebel strongholds inside northern Yemen today in a surge of fighting along the border following the death of a Saudi security official at the hands of insurgents, according to news reports. Saudi fighter jets targeted up to six rebel positions inside Yemen and along the mountainous border. Saudi troops were reportedly heading toward the region to secure villages and prevent further cross-border incursions from Houthi rebel forces that have been battling the Yemen government sporadically since 2004.
WORLD
September 17, 2009 | Haley Sweetland Edwards and Borzou Daragahi
Rebels in Yemen's northwest Saada province and government-controlled media issued contradictory claims of success in combat Wednesday, amid a 5-week-old army offensive that has roiled this Arabian peninsula nation. The fighting has created a growing humanitarian problem mostly beyond the reach of aid agencies, with some 35,000 people driven from their homes in the last month, according to the United Nations. That adds to the estimated 100,000 people who have been displaced in the combat zone in an off-and-on war that began in 2004.
NEWS
April 1, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
President Ali Abdullah Saleh fired his prime minister and asked Deputy Prime Minister Abdul-Kadir Ba Jammal to form a new government, the sixth since 1990, a presidential statement said. The statement gave no reason for the firing of Abdul-Karim Iryani, who had served nearly three years. But he was seen as unable to accomplish many of Yemen's economic reforms, launched in 1995 with help from the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank.
NEWS
December 31, 1998 | From Associated Press
The hostages said they were being led up to a mountain hide-out by their kidnappers when shots first rang out: Yemeni soldiers sent to rescue the 16 Westerners had opened fire. In response, the foreign tourists were forced to stand with their hands in the air to shield the gunmen. When the hostages staggered back, two were shot dead by their captors and the others cowered behind an embankment, two former hostages said Wednesday.
NEWS
June 1, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIME STAFF WRITER
There was little to prepare this land of volcanic peaks and sand-swept villages, once the arid domain of the Queen of Sheba, to lead Arabia on the road to democracy. The narrow streets are still filled with men who thrust curved daggers in their belts. The tribes of the north even now wage occasional conquests from hill to rocky hill. Ancient dhows still call on the busy seaport of Aden.
NEWS
October 24, 2000 | DAVID KELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The battered white Toyota bumped slowly down the alley. The driver leaned out the window searching each face for something safe and familiar. He hit the brakes after spotting a family friend, a lean old man with skin like coffee and teeth of gold. The two spoke discreetly before ducking into a stairwell and shouting up the steps. "Who are you?" a voice called down nervously. "It's OK," they said. "We are from the south." "Come," the voice said.
NEWS
October 20, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER and DAVID KELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The U.S. Navy on Thursday recovered the last four bodies of American sailors from the disabled destroyer Cole, as the retired military commander who had approved the policy of refueling ships in Yemen told a Senate panel that the danger level, while high, was "actually better than we had elsewhere" in the region.
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