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Yevgeny Nazdratenko

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NEWS
June 27, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is Russia's most notorious governor. After three years of rule by Yevgeny Nazdratenko, the once-rich Pacific coastal region around the port city of Vladivostok has turned into a hell of unpaid wages, unlighted homes and rampant graft. Nazdratenko intimidates the press, feuds openly with his mayor and blames Moscow when billions of rubles in federal money are missing from his office. But he is elected, so he cannot legally be fired.
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NEWS
June 27, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is Russia's most notorious governor. After three years of rule by Yevgeny Nazdratenko, the once-rich Pacific coastal region around the port city of Vladivostok has turned into a hell of unpaid wages, unlighted homes and rampant graft. Nazdratenko intimidates the press, feuds openly with his mayor and blames Moscow when billions of rubles in federal money are missing from his office. But he is elected, so he cannot legally be fired.
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NEWS
March 6, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So what do you give the authoritarian who has everything? Well, if you're a provincial governor in Russia's Far East, you give him the pelt of an endangered Siberian tiger. At least, that was what Yevgeny Nazdratenko, the Soviet-style boss of Russia's Primorsky region, presented to Belarussian President Alexander G. Lukashenko last week when the latter passed through Vladivostok on his way home from the Winter Olympics in Japan.
NEWS
April 20, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sign of the mood in Russia to sweep away the Yeltsin era and push ahead with change, the upper house of parliament voted Wednesday to dismiss the country's suspended prosecutor general and to ratify the START II treaty. Coming after an appeal by President-elect Vladimir V. Putin to dismiss Yuri I. Skuratov, the vote underscored Putin's ability to push his changes through the lower and upper chambers of the parliament.
NEWS
May 11, 1997 | KAREN OGDEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
At 6 p.m. the lights go out. Refrigerators clank to a stop, and residents of this port city begin to grumble about yet another evening of cooking dinner on portable camp stoves. Periodic power outages, mounds of garbage on the streets and salaries that are months overdue are just a few signs of the decay and poverty that have gripped Vladivostok, the largest city in Russia's Far East.
NEWS
April 25, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS and RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As relations between Russia and China approach their warmest moment in half a century, President Boris N. Yeltsin preceded his arrival here Wednesday with a blast at illegal Chinese immigrants and a vow to delay final resolution of a 300-year-old border dispute. The dual swipes at this host country while embarking on a state visit were clearly concessions to nationalist critics as the Russian leader wages an uphill reelection bid.
BUSINESS
May 23, 1997 | KAREN OGDEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
At 6 p.m., the lights go out. Refrigerators clank to a stop and residents of this port city begin to grumble about yet another evening of cooking dinner on portable camp stoves. Periodic power outages, mounds of garbage on the streets and salaries that are months overdue are just a few signs of the decay and poverty that have gripped Vladivostok, the largest city in Russia's Far East.
OPINION
January 14, 2001 | Gregory Freidin, Gregory Freidin is a professor and chairman of the Slavic Department, Stanford University. He is collaborating, with Victoria E. Bonnell, on a book, "Conjuring Up Russia: Symbols and Rituals of the New Russian State."
A year since his ascension to Russia's presidency, first as acting president and, since March, the country's elected leader, both Vladimir V. Putin and Russia stand disenchanted and diminished before the world and their own battered countrymen. True, industrial growth has resumed in Russia and incomes are rising, but whether this economic uptick is due more to skyrocketing oil prices--Russia is a major exporter--or efficiency remains to be seen.
BUSINESS
November 13, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the Australian restaurant serving kangaroo steaks, in the television programming from Japan and Korea and on the billboards hawking American apple juice and computers, this former Cold War fortress now seems eagerly embraced by capitalism. But equally apparent is the clinging grasp of Moscow, holding back its eastern territories from what federal authorities see as defection to the Pacific Rim. The shabby housing blocks are shrouded in darkness from 6 p.m.
NEWS
August 3, 1996 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five months after they last got paid, the miners of the Russian Far East are beginning to starve. By Friday, all 10,000 of them had stopped work--not, they say, out of ill will but simply because they are just too weak to handle the tough conditions underground. No coal is being extracted. The region's power plant workers, themselves unpaid for months, also are refusing to operate the stations that supply electricity to the factories, homes and port of the local capital, Vladivostok.
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