Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsYiyun Li
IN THE NEWS

Yiyun Li

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 19, 2004 | From Associated Press
The Paris Review, the literary quarterly founded in 1953, has announced its first winner of the Plimpton Prize, named for longtime editor George Plimpton, who died last fall. Yiyun Li, cited for the short story "Immortality," will receive $5,000 for "the best piece of writing by a newcomer to appear in the Paris Review in a given year."
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2014 | By David Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Yiyun Li begins her second novel, "Kinder Than Solitude," in a place of endings: a crematorium. The time is the present, more or less, and a Beijing resident named Boyang waits for the ashes of his childhood friend Shaoai, dead at 43 after having been poisoned (accidentally or otherwise) 21 years before. "Who wanted her to die?" Boyang's mother asks when he visits after dropping off the woman's cremains with her family. "Who wanted to kill her back then?" These questions resonate throughout this novel, which moves fluidly between past and present, among Beijing, Massachusetts and the Bay Area, in tracing the intersecting lives of four people - Boyang, Shaoai and two other women, Ruyu and Moran - as they wrestle with both their complicity and their heritage.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Plus 'At Home With Andre and Simone Weil' by Sylvie Weil; 'Framing Innocence' by Lynn Powell. Gold Boy, Emerald Girl Stories Yiyun Li Random House: 221 pp., $25 Some books leave you hungry. Perhaps it is the overwhelming loneliness of many of Yiyun Li's characters, their quiet desperation that makes a reader turn the pages hoping for resolution and redemption. But this is not Disneyland, this is Shanghai. Moyan, looking back on her 41 years, on her childhood with an unhappy mother, her young adulthood in the Chinese army and her lonely life as a mathematics teacher, is every bit as empty as Camus' stranger.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Plus 'At Home With Andre and Simone Weil' by Sylvie Weil; 'Framing Innocence' by Lynn Powell. Gold Boy, Emerald Girl Stories Yiyun Li Random House: 221 pp., $25 Some books leave you hungry. Perhaps it is the overwhelming loneliness of many of Yiyun Li's characters, their quiet desperation that makes a reader turn the pages hoping for resolution and redemption. But this is not Disneyland, this is Shanghai. Moyan, looking back on her 41 years, on her childhood with an unhappy mother, her young adulthood in the Chinese army and her lonely life as a mathematics teacher, is every bit as empty as Camus' stranger.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2005 | Bob Thompson, Washington Post
Five years ago, Yiyun Li had a problem: How to persuade the literary world to take seriously a 28-year-old native Chinese speaker trying to write in English who had published exactly nothing and whose training consisted of a single adult-education class? Since then, the Beijing-born Li's career arc has been so steep it gives her peers vertigo. She's had stories published in prestigious magazines such as the New Yorker and the Paris Review.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2009
As I read Scott Timberg's article about author Yiyun Li, ["Haunting Memories," Feb. 15], I couldn't quite figure out what it was that bothered me about what he wrote of Li until I got to the end when Timberg pointed out that Li's parents still live in China. Li wasn't self-deprecating; she was self-censoring. Ann Lau Los Angeles
BOOKS
November 13, 2005 | Susan Salter Reynolds
----- Beasts of No Nation Uzodinma Iweala HarperCollins: 142 pp., $16.95 AGU is a young boy of unspecified age in an unnamed West African country. In English that is as broken and remade as the child himself, the protagonist of "Beasts of No Nation" tells of being dragged from a hiding place and recruited to fight by guerrilla soldiers who had attacked his village and killed his family. Under the brutal guerrilla leader Commandant, Agu and another boy, Strika, are trained and forced to kill.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2014 | By David Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Yiyun Li begins her second novel, "Kinder Than Solitude," in a place of endings: a crematorium. The time is the present, more or less, and a Beijing resident named Boyang waits for the ashes of his childhood friend Shaoai, dead at 43 after having been poisoned (accidentally or otherwise) 21 years before. "Who wanted her to die?" Boyang's mother asks when he visits after dropping off the woman's cremains with her family. "Who wanted to kill her back then?" These questions resonate throughout this novel, which moves fluidly between past and present, among Beijing, Massachusetts and the Bay Area, in tracing the intersecting lives of four people - Boyang, Shaoai and two other women, Ruyu and Moran - as they wrestle with both their complicity and their heritage.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2009 | Scott Timberg, Timberg blogs at scott-timberg.blogspot.com.
In the late 1960s and throughout the 1970s, while the West was immersed in a revolution of personal liberation, China underwent another kind of upheaval, the Cultural Revolution, in which the state clamped down on bourgeois hedonism and targeted even the mildest of dissidents. This is the setting of "The Vagrants" (Random House: 338 pp., $25), the first novel by Yiyun Li, a Northern California writer regarded for her short stories -- a world of rooftop loudspeakers, of Maoist propaganda posters, of a couple charged for the bullet used to execute their renegade daughter.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2007 | Josh Getlin
The British literary magazine Granta announced Thursday the 21 writers who have made its second Best Young American Novelists list. The authors include some of the rising stars in the American book world.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2009
As I read Scott Timberg's article about author Yiyun Li, ["Haunting Memories," Feb. 15], I couldn't quite figure out what it was that bothered me about what he wrote of Li until I got to the end when Timberg pointed out that Li's parents still live in China. Li wasn't self-deprecating; she was self-censoring. Ann Lau Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2009 | Scott Timberg, Timberg blogs at scott-timberg.blogspot.com.
In the late 1960s and throughout the 1970s, while the West was immersed in a revolution of personal liberation, China underwent another kind of upheaval, the Cultural Revolution, in which the state clamped down on bourgeois hedonism and targeted even the mildest of dissidents. This is the setting of "The Vagrants" (Random House: 338 pp., $25), the first novel by Yiyun Li, a Northern California writer regarded for her short stories -- a world of rooftop loudspeakers, of Maoist propaganda posters, of a couple charged for the bullet used to execute their renegade daughter.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2005 | Bob Thompson, Washington Post
Five years ago, Yiyun Li had a problem: How to persuade the literary world to take seriously a 28-year-old native Chinese speaker trying to write in English who had published exactly nothing and whose training consisted of a single adult-education class? Since then, the Beijing-born Li's career arc has been so steep it gives her peers vertigo. She's had stories published in prestigious magazines such as the New Yorker and the Paris Review.
BOOKS
November 13, 2005 | Susan Salter Reynolds
----- Beasts of No Nation Uzodinma Iweala HarperCollins: 142 pp., $16.95 AGU is a young boy of unspecified age in an unnamed West African country. In English that is as broken and remade as the child himself, the protagonist of "Beasts of No Nation" tells of being dragged from a hiding place and recruited to fight by guerrilla soldiers who had attacked his village and killed his family. Under the brutal guerrilla leader Commandant, Agu and another boy, Strika, are trained and forced to kill.
NEWS
February 19, 2004 | From Associated Press
The Paris Review, the literary quarterly founded in 1953, has announced its first winner of the Plimpton Prize, named for longtime editor George Plimpton, who died last fall. Yiyun Li, cited for the short story "Immortality," will receive $5,000 for "the best piece of writing by a newcomer to appear in the Paris Review in a given year."
OPINION
November 5, 2008
Re "The sobering of America," Opinion, Nov. 2 and "Ex-Marine rebuilds his life after brush with death in Iraq," Nov. 2 I'm sure Yiyun Li's article made some Bush haters nod their heads in collective disapproval of an America in decline. Elsewhere in The Times, Tony Perry chronicled the "new life and new set of goals" of wounded Iraq veteran Where Li laments the loss of Clinton-era laughter, Popaditch laughs about the prospect of teaching high school after combat -- despite the fact that he lost most of his vision fighting for his country.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2008 | Kevin Thomas, Special to The Times
With the quiet, understated "A Thousand Years of Good Prayers," Wayne Wang has come full circle, returning to the small, intimate films like "Chan Is Missing," "Dim Sum: A Little Bit of Heart" and "Eat a Bowl of Tea" that established the Hong Kong-born Chinese American writer-director, best known for his deft screen adaptation of "The Joy Luck Club." When recently widowed Mr.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|