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Yoga

BUSINESS
June 19, 1997 | MARIE-CLAUDE LORTIE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On weekend mornings on fashionably casual Montana Avenue in Santa Monica, the best way to disappear in the crowd is to carry a vitamin-fortified juice smoothie in one hand and a rolled-up rubber mat under the other arm. The mat is a giveaway that its owner practices yoga, an activity that has made a steady comeback in the '90s and is now shifting into higher gear as a business. Stylish, airy yoga centers--including at least one franchise chain--are opening throughout Southern California.
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HEALTH
June 30, 2003 | Dianne Partie Lange
Yoga is touted as a stress reliever, and there's growing biochemical evidence to support that belief. For one week, 16 young adults who had not done yoga more than once took a 50-minute class with a traditionally trained teacher, co-investigator Vijayendra Pratap of the Philadelphia-based Yoga Research Society. For comparison purposes, the volunteers spent 50 minutes resting in a quiet room the day before the class began.
NEWS
November 22, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A British vicar has banned yoga classes from his church hall because he fears they could lead his flock away from Christian teaching. "I fully appreciate that for some people yoga is just exercise, but I am also aware that yoga is often a gateway to other things, such as Eastern mysticism," the Rev. Dick Farr said. "We are here to promote Jesus and don't want to offer a platform to anybody who is going to undermine that." The ban at St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1997 | MICHAEL KRIKORIAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Getting a day off to the right start begins before even getting out of bed, yoga teacher Het Heru tells her students. While lying on the back, lift one leg and extend it straight, she tells them. Flex it, pull the toes toward the body and count to 30. Do the same with the other leg. Then get out of bed, open a door or window and take 10 breaths. "Before you even go to the bathroom, open the window to get the fresh morning air and breathe deep," she said.
HEALTH
March 11, 2002 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The outrage begins with the full-page advertisement on page 11 of Yoga Journal's April issue. "Invitational. Yoga Pose Off. $30,000 First Prize!" Then in smaller print: "Watch the world's best as they battle for prestige and cash!"
NEWS
August 25, 2002
Gurmukh Kaur Khalsa is an expert on yoga ("Earth Mother, Yoga Star," Aug. 16). She obviously knows what she is doing to give mothers relaxation and serenity, and this doubtless has a positive effect on the unborn child. But she demonstrates the fatal flaw of many "gurus." Charles Lindbergh was an expert on aeronautics, but he expounded on (and was listened to about) politics when he had no more expertise than the person in the street. Gurus have an obligation to be careful about the spillover halo effect.
HEALTH
September 2, 2002 | ERIN CHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In my earliest memory of ballet class, I am sprinting out of a dance studio and into my mother's arms. I am 5 years old, and the clingy tights, constricting leotard and competitive brunette with a perfect bun are too much for me to handle. Nestled in my mother's arms, I decide I've had enough of ballet. Then one recent day I was cruising the Internet and stumbled onto a description for a class called "yoga booty ballet."
NEWS
April 3, 2003 | Lisa Boone, Times Staff Writer
Just days after the war in Iraq began, a group of children are together for yoga class at L.A. Yoga Center in Westwood. Acknowledging that it had been a rough week, instructor Joy Marcus guides the group, ranging in age from 5 to 10, through a variety of dances, stretches and poses. From dog pose ("Make friends with your hamstrings!") to tree pose ("I'm going to water you and watch you grow"), handstands to headstands, the children stretch, purr, sing and dance with confidence.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2007 | Donnell Alexander
In these enlightened times, it doesn't take a guru to know the best age to start learning downward facing dog is as a young pup. This month, Kidspace, the 28-year-old Pasadena children's museum with the emphasis on arts, science and the humanities, begins offering five-week sessions of yoga for children. Classes start Tuesday for youngsters ages 3 to 5. The following day, kids ages 6 to 9 can begin to get a leg up -- and possibly over their heads -- en route to exact chakra location.
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