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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1993
In response to "Yosemite Pact Given by U.S. to Stadium Firm," Dec. 18: I need to express my outrage at what appears to be a blatant political deal on the part of the environmentally antagonistic Bush Administration. After years of careful study and surveys on the part of those who deeply care about Yosemite, to evaluate "50,000 pages worth of bids in just two weeks" smells of the lame ducks having their last feast . . . or perhaps there was a fear that the Clinton Administration would make a more thoughtful choice.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2014 | By Christine Mai-Duc, This post had been corrected. See note below for details.
Rescuers had to airlift a rock climber out of Yosemite National Park after he suffered major injuries in a 30-foot fall Sunday, authorities said. A 26-year-old man from Palo Alto, Calif. was climbing with a partner Sunday morning and was about halfway up the Higher Cathedral Spire, one of a series of near-vertical granite pinnacles, according to Officer Andrea Brown of the California Highway Patrol's Air Operations Division. He reportedly fell about 30 feet and was unable to move without excruciating pain, Brown said.
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NEWS
July 9, 2012 | By Chris Erskine, Los Angeles Times staff writer
When you think about it, Yosemite is one big birthing room. As such, rangers are cautioning summer visitors to look but not touch, and to give any young wildlife - baby birds, fawns, etc. - plenty of space. “They may appear to be in distress, but are not sick, injured, or abandoned,” the park notes of young wildlife. “If moved from their location, the parents cannot care for their offspring and many of the young animals do not survive.” If spotted on the ground, these animals should not be moved or handled, rangers say. In fact, visitors who happen across newborn wildlife are asked to immediately leave the area so the parents can continue to care for their young.  “When people are present, a mother deer or bird may become aggressive or stay away for longer periods of time, which will prevent the offspring from feeding on a regular basis,” the park says in cautioning visitors.
NEWS
April 16, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
If you want to know what a national park smells like, head to Yosemite National Park and inhale. Maybe you'll catch the sweet scent of lupine or the butterscotch aroma of a ponderosa pine. What you are unlikely to smell is wild strawberries -- unless you buy a national park air freshener. Just in time for National Park Week , which starts Saturday, Air Wick has launched new "limited edition scents" named for the Channel Islands , Yosemite and Biscayne national parks and Gulf Islands National Seashore . Yosemite is described as smelling like "wild strawberries fused with soothing mists of mountain rain.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Chris Erskine, Los Angeles Times
In response to the recent outbreak, Yosemite is distributing hantavirus information to every visitor. Since HPS was first identified in 1993, there have been approximately 60 cases in California and 602 cases nationally, the park says. Nationwide, approximately 20% of mice carry hantavirus.. . . . Bermuda is on a tropical storm watch as Hurricane Leslie hovers to the south-southeast. Little motion or change in strength is expected until sometime Friday . . . . A hoax tip called in to airport police was being blamed Thursday when a Dallas-bound flight out of Philadelphia was recalled by authorities and a passenger removed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2013 | By Kate Mather
More details emerged about the 73-year-old hiker who fell to his death at a popular Yosemite waterfall, officials said. Kenneth Stensby's body was spotted by searchers at the base of Vernal Fall at about 6 p.m. Monday and was extricated about 1 p.m. Tuesday, park officials said in a statement. The statement said the Minnesota man, described as an avid hiker, was fatally injured when he fell from a cliff near the top of the 317-foot waterfall. His death marked the first accidental fatality at the park this year, spokeswoman Kari Cobb said.
TRAVEL
January 6, 2002
Your article on Yosemite ("Yosemite, the Picture of Peace," Dec. 23) was wonderful; the pictures added to my memory of a place I call heaven. We just returned from a Bracebridge Dinner, and I highly recommend the experience. When we arrived the park was blanketed with snow, a real picture postcard. We stayed at the Ahwahnee, which made the event all the better since we didn't have to take a shuttle bus to the hotel. In addition, we enjoyed meeting the other guests who gathered around the grand piano for caroling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1997
"Honk if You Love Yosemite" by Peter H. King (March 5) was wonderful! I'm a geology instructor, and it was so great to see someone give voice to the need to have the "common" people be able to view Yosemite. Each year I try to open the eyes of students to these natural wonders. It is heartbreaking to me to have so many areas closed off except for the "few" that are extremely physically fit. This is happening all over the West right now and we have to give voice to these closings! There needs to be balance between are right to use and the right to abuse our natural wonders.
OPINION
February 4, 1990
I remember the first time I ever saw Yosemite. It was 1967 and I was 6 years old. There were still some fish in the Merced River. The meadows were not wiped out from the hordes of tourists that Jones claims infest the valley "only 3 or 4 weekends each summer." Over the last 22 years I have visited Yosemite many times, spent summers working there. Make no mistake about it, Yosemite has changed. It has changed in a thousand little ways; less flora, more trash, more cars, more people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2014 | By Hector Becerra
A pilot was killed Friday when his small, custom-built plane crashed in Central California at the foot of the Sierra. Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Allen Kenitzer said the single-engine, amateur-built Bowers Fly Baby 1A crashed just after 10 a.m. "under unknown circumstances in rugged terrain" about three miles north of Mariposa-Yosemite Airport. The pilot, whose name has not been released, was the only passenger in the plane. The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the cause of the crash.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Robert J. Lopez
A massive rock fall has forced officials to close a popular hiking trail in the Hetch Hetchy area of Yosemite National Park. Park officials said Monday that more than 16,000 tons of rock fell 500 feet, toppling trees and scattering boulders that destroyed a section of Rancheria Falls Trail. The tumbling rocks kicked up large clouds of dust along Hetch Hetchy Reservoir, according to a photo provided by the National Park Service. The Rancheria trail was closed just east of the Wapama Creek footbridges until further notice, Yosemite officials said in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | By Kate Mather
Thousands of acres of Yosemite National Park closed to the public since last year's massive Rim fire have been reopened, officials announced Wednesday. However, park officials cautioned those visiting the affected areas - which include Hetch Hetchy hiking trails and the Tuolumne Grove of Giant Sequoias - faced "potential risks" such as "hazardous trees, uneven ground, potential rockfall, and down and dead debris on trails. " Fire restrictions also have been lifted, park officials said in their statement, but could be put in place again later this year because of California's "extreme drought conditions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | By Kate Mather
Thousands of acres of Yosemite National Park that were closed to the public since last year's massive Rim fire have been reopened, park officials announced Wednesday. However, park officials cautioned visitors to the affected areas - which include Hetch Hetchy hiking trails and the Tuolumne Grove of Giant Sequoias - about potential risks such as "hazardous trees, uneven ground, potential rockfall, and down and dead debris on trails. " Fire restrictions also have been lifted, but could be put in place again later this year because of California's extreme drought conditions, the park statement said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | Steve Chawkins
When Sean "Stanley" Leary's friends heard he'd gone missing in Utah's Zion National Park, they drove hundreds of miles to help. Leary was well-known in the tight-knit world of mountain adventurers. At Yosemite National Park, he was an old hand, with more than 50 ascents of El Capitan under his belt - including a record-setting 2 1/2-hour scramble up a 2,900-foot wall that demands several days from seasoned climbers. He explored new routes up peaks in the Arctic and in Antarctica and was an ardent BASE jumper - an adventure enthusiast who leaps off mountains and other high places.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2014 | By Ruben Vives
A 17-year-old Simi Valley boy drowned in Yosemite National Park as he attempted to rescue his parents, authorities said Thursday. The incident is the first drowning in Yosemite this year, said park spokesman Scott Gediman. The Mariposa County Sheriff's Department identified the teen as Walter Gonzalez. The incident occurred Sunday around 3 p.m. at a popular swimming area known as Devil's Elbow, part of the Merced River and two miles west of Yosemite Village, authorities said.
SCIENCE
March 4, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
Black bears in Yosemite National Park aren't snacking as much on human food as they did decades ago, according to new research that traces changes in the diet of Yosemite bears over the last century. Researchers analyzed samples of bear bones from museums and bear hair collected from the field to determine the ratio of human-to-wild-food that Yosemite bears consumed as far back as 1915. Not surprisingly, they found that the proportion of human food rose significantly after the park started feeding bears in 1923 to keep the animals away from developed areas.
OPINION
March 2, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
El Capitan isn't going anywhere and neither is Bridalveil Fall, but a lot of the man-made structures on the floor of Yosemite Valley will be shifted around under the final version of the National Park Service preservation plan for the Merced River. The plan, which will be reviewed at a public meeting on Thursday, does a far better job of preserving recreational activities in the valley than the draconian draft from a year ago that would have banned such environmentally friendly pastimes as bicycle and raft rentals.
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