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Yosemite National Park

NEWS
January 17, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
If you're heading to Yosemite National Park for Martin Luther King Jr. Day weekend, you might think about swapping your skis for hiking boots. Skiing at Badger Pass resort is closed, but the horse stable and bicycle rentals will open Friday and remain open as long as the mild weather holds. "We are not anticipating any other summertime activities to open, but it is very unusual to be able to hike the Four Mile Trail, go on a guided trail ride and bike ride in the Valley in January," says Lisa Cesaro, public relations manager for DNC Park & Resorts at Yosemite.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
The U.S. Forest Service is proposing an extensive salvage operation to log dead trees on about 46 square miles of timberland charred in last year's massive Rim fire in the Sierra Nevada. The project would be one of the largest federal salvage efforts in California in years. If approved, it could yield more lumber than the combined annual output of all the national forests in the state. But it is already triggering a fight by some environmentalists who argue that the post-fire logging would destroy valuable habitat for rare birds and other species that thrive in blackened forests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2013 | By Kate Mather
President Obama signed a disaster declaration Friday for the state of California, making federal funds available for recovery efforts related to  the massive Rim fire near Yosemite National Park. The money is available to state and local governments and eligible private nonprofits for emergency work and to repair or replace facilities damaged by the blaze, the Federal Emergency Management Agency said in a statement. The 410-square-mile fire - the state's third largest on record - sparked Aug. 17 by a hunter's illegal campfire in the Stanislaus National Forest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
A Tuolumne County official said this week that federal prosecutors have "privately declared" their intention to charge a hunter who earlier this year sparked the Rim fire, the third-largest in state history. Tuolumne County District Atty. Michael Knowles said federal authorities long ago completed their investigation into the cause, origin and who was responsible for the blaze, which started on Aug. 17 and burned 402 square miles across the Yosemite and Stanislaus National forests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2013 | By Kate Mather
A 60-year-old hiker missing in Yosemite National Park for two days was found Monday, injured but alive, officials said. A family member working with a search-and-rescue team found Ann Lory about 11:30 a.m. in the search area near Foresta, a small community near Yosemite's western boundary, park officials said. Lory was taken to a hospital. The extent of her injuries was not disclosed. Lory left her home in Foresta early Saturday morning to hike along Old Coulterville Road and Old Big Oak Flat roads, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2013 | By Kate Mather
Park rangers and search and rescue teams continued to comb a stretch of Yosemite National Park on Monday for a 60-year-old hiker missing for two days, park officials said. Ann Lory left her home in Foresta -- a small community near the park's western boundary -- early Saturday morning to hike along Old Coulterville Road and Old Big Oak Flat roads, officials said. She hasn't been seen since. Search and rescue teams from six counties, along with the California Highway Patrol, are assisting park rangers with the search in and around Foresta, park officials said.
NEWS
October 31, 2013 | By Terry Gardner
National Parks will be celebrating Veterans Day with free admission Nov. 9-11 for veterans. Free admission to the parks includes free entrance, of course, plus free parking. (Ranger programs are free to everyone, as always.) Guests will need to pay for camping reservations, tours, food concessions and other commercial activities.  Here's a peek at two popular California parks.  At Death Valley National Park, November daytime temperatures usually are in the 70s and 80s, making this is one of the coolest times of the year to visit the park, which is about 300 miles from Los Angeles.  For a list of free ranger programs, stop by the Furnace Creek Visitor Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2013 | By Stephen Ceasar
The massive Rim fire in and around Yosemite National Park that began in August and burned 250,000 acres was declared 100% contained Friday by fire officials. The blaze, which ignited Aug. 17 by a hunter's illegal campfire, was the third-largest wildfire in California history and burned 398 square miles, the U.S. Forest Service said. The cost of battling the Rim fire reached over $127.3 million. It destroyed 112 structures, including 11 homes, according to fire officials. The fire was indicative of the type of fire California is prone to experiencing during fire season, said Daniel Berlant, a spokesman for the  California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection . “It grew so quickly during a one-week period, it took state, local and federal fire fighters to make a stand,” Berlant said Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
GROVELAND, Calif. - The Rim fire that scorched a huge swath of Sierra Nevada forests also severely altered the habitat that is home to several of California's rarest animals: the great gray owl, the Sierra Nevada red fox and the Pacific fisher. The fire burned 257,000 acres of High Sierra wilderness straddling the Stanislaus National Forest and Yosemite National Park that harbors a geographically isolated and genetically distinct clan of roughly 200 great gray owls. The blaze also came within 12 miles of 10 breeding pairs of the subspecies of red fox clinging to survival in the cold, steep slopes above the tree line, raising fears they could have been eaten by coyotes trying to escape the smoke and flames.
NATIONAL
October 17, 2013 | By Richard Simon and Becca Clemons
WASHINGTON - Yosemite National Park's visitor centers were open. The barricades at the World War II memorial were down. And the Giant Panda Cam was back on. Thousands of federal workers returned to their jobs Thursday after Congress passed and President Obama signed a measure to end the 16-day government shutdown. The public was more than ready. "Within 10 minutes of turning the panda cam back on this morning, we reached capacity," said Pamela Baker-Masson of the National Zoo. But it will take more than unlocking doors and turning on lights before it's business as usual again in the federal bureaucracy.
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