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Yosemite

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez
Officials at Yosemite National Park announced that it reopened Wednesday night after Congress approved a deal to end the federal government shutdown. Visitors can use public areas and roads immediately while other park facilities and services begin to reopen Thursday, park Supt. Don Neubacher said. "We are excited to reopen and welcome visitors back to Yosemite," he said in a statement. "Autumn is a particularly special season to enjoy Yosemite's colorful grandeur. " FULL COVERAGE: The U.S. government shutdown Federal officials said that all 401 national parks and monuments will be reopening after the 17-day shutdown.
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NEWS
October 4, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Stacey Powells, a news editor at two Eastern Sierra radio stations, is spitting mad about the government shutdown of national parks in her backyard. If the closure that began Tuesday continues, Powells plans to hold an Occupy Yosemite event Friday (today) during a "sit-down protest" at Tuolumne Meadows inside the park. "Closing our national parks is absurd and is hurting all of us here in the Eastern Sierra," she wrote in a letter to the Sierra Wave that was posted online Wednesday . "Our businesses are hurting.
OPINION
October 3, 2013 | By Chad Hanson
It was entirely predictable. Even before the ashes have cooled on the 257,000-acre Rim fire in and around Yosemite this year, the timber industry and its allies in Congress were using the fire as an excuse for suspending environmental laws and expanding logging operations on federal land. "The Yosemite Rim fire is a tragedy that has destroyed 400 square miles of our forests," said Rep. Tom McClintock (R-Elk Grove) in announcing a bill he introduced late last month that would expedite massive taxpayer-subsidized clear-cutting on federal public lands in the fire area.
NEWS
October 3, 2013 | By Christopher Reynolds
We're sorry, world. As you know, countless travelers from around the globe got shafted this week when U.S. elected officials, unable to compromise on a budget, closed down more than 400 national park system sites (and much of the federal government). But just because our intransigent officials have locked you out of Yellowstone and Yosemite - and left legions of Americans without needed income or services - that doesn't mean you have to sit in your hostel in your black socks and sandals, cursing your luck and our leaders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2013 | By Kurt Streeter
Clare Cogan and Daniel Mohally stood forlornly inside the Yosemite Visitors Bureau, trying to figure out how to salvage their honeymoon. The Cork, Ireland, couple had flown to the United States last week for a honeymoon trip that started in San Diego and will end in San Francisco. But the highlight of their trip was meant to be an excursion to Yosemite. “We grew up seeing pictures of it in books,” Cogan, a 31-year-old receptionist, said Tuesday. “You know, the cars underneath those huge Sequoia trees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2013 | By Kurt Streeter and Scott Gold
YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK, Calif. - Clare Cogan and Daniel Mohally stood forlornly inside the Yosemite Sierra Visitors Bureau, trying to determine how to salvage their honeymoon. The Cork, Ireland, couple had flown to the United States last week for a honeymoon that started in San Diego and will end in San Francisco. In between - the highlight of their trip - was an excursion to Yosemite. "We grew up seeing pictures of it in books," said Cogan, a 31-year-old receptionist. "You know, the cars underneath those huge sequoia trees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz
As Congress failed to agree on a budget and President Obama's healthcare law, parts of the federal government have started shutting down, with stoppages felt by Southern California residents and across the nation. One of the most jarring repercussions is the impending closure of 401 national parks that include Yosemite and Joshua Tree, among others.  "Anyone who's hoping to arrive, even for a day visit, would see gates closed and would be turned away," said Mike Litterst, a spokesman for the National Park Service.
NEWS
October 1, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Congress established Yosemite National Park on Oct. 1, 1890 -- and shut down it down on its birthday Tuesday over the budget standoff. National parks, Smithsonian museums and even World War II overseas cemeteries have been closed because of the government shutdown that began at midnight. Travelers will still be able to fly because vital services such as air traffic controllers and airport security screeners will remain on the job. But what will you see when you arrive at your destination?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2013 | By Tony Barboza and Jason Wells
Yosemite National Park celebrated its 123rd birthday with a major nod from Google on Tuesday. From the federal government, not so much. One of the most visible repercussions of the federal government shutdown -- the immediate closure of the country's 401 national parks -- was made all the more obvious Tuesday with a Google Doodle that payed homage to Yosemite. But starting Tuesday morning, visitors will find entrance gates closed and barricaded, visitor centers shuttered and their camping and hotel reservations   canceled, park officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun
Climate change is taking a visible toll on Yosemite National Park, where the largest ice mass in the park is in a death spiral, geologists say. During an annual trek to the glacier deep in Yosemite's backcountry last month, Greg Stock, the park's first full-time geologist, found that Lyell Glacier had shrunk visibly since his visit last year, continuing a trend that began more than a century ago. Lyell has dropped 62% of its mass and lost 120...
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