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Yosemite

OPINION
September 25, 2013
Re "Risky Rim fire tactics save big trees," Sept. 23 I was completely captivated by this account of the ultimately successful effort to keep the Rim fire from destroying some of California's oldest and most precious natural wonders. I, like so many others, just can't imagine our state without Yosemite. The ancient trees there have survived the threat of total destruction by fire for centuries, but that survival is never guaranteed. Those firefighters who helped save Yosemite are heroes of the highest order.
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NEWS
September 17, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Yosemite National Park officials reopened the east-west California 120 last weekend, though the Rim fire continues to burn and has kept the Tuolumne Grove of sequoias and some campgrounds closed. Travelers also should not enter any part of the burn area on foot. California 120 , also known as Tioga Road, reopened at noon last Saturday after having been closed between Crane Flat and White Wolf for firefighting activities. Yosemite National Park officials advise travelers not to stop along the fire perimeter on the road that links Yosemite Valley to Tuolumne Meadows and the east entrance to the park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2013 | By Jason Wells and Joseph Serna
The massive Rim fire in and around Yosemite National Park remains 80% contained after growing in size over the weekend. Firefighters on Monday face hot, extremely dry conditions that, combined with shifting winds and low humidity, can make for “active fire behavior,” according to the U.S. Forest Service. The Rim fire - the third-largest fire in California history - has so far cost $96.2 million to fight after erupting in the Stanislaus National Forest on Aug. 17. It has destroyed 11 homes and 97 outbuildings, according to the Forest Service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2013 | By Joseph Serna and Diana Marcum
GROVELAND, Calif. - The Rim fire burning in and around Yosemite National Park is now the third largest in California history as firefighters planned another attack this weekend. The blaze, which erupted in the Stanislaus National Forest north of the Tuolumne River, has destroyed 111 buildings, including 11 homes and three businesses. The cost of fighting the fire reached $84.8 million Friday. Six people have been injured. It started when a hunter let his illegal campfire get out of control, federal forest officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
The Rim fire burning near Yosemite has burned 246,350 acres, making it the third largest fire in state history, the U.S. Forest Service said Friday. The blaze, which erupted in the Stanislaus National Forest north of the Tuolumne River on Aug. 17, has burned about 385 square miles of national forest and parkland and destroyed 111 buildings, including 11 homes and three businesses. The cost of fighting the fire reached $81 million Thursday. The Rim fire replaced the 2007 Zaca fire in Santa Barbara County as California's third largest ever.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2013 | By Joseph Serna and Diana Marcum
GROVELAND, Calif.--Authorities said they will open the western section of California 120 into Yosemite National Park at noon Friday after closing it more than two weeks ago to fight the Rim fire. Visitors will have full access to Yosemite Valley from the park's western entrance from Groveland for the first time since the Rim fire broke out Aug. 17. Though a 14-mile stretch of the highway is closed within the park - from Crane Flat to White Wolf - the update was met with joy Friday.
NEWS
September 6, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
The California 120 entrance to Yosemite National Park that was shut by the Rim fire will reopen at noon Friday, though firefighting activities in the national park continue. The reopened road means travelers will be able to enter the park and drive to Yosemite Valley along Big Oak Flat Road from Groveland, Calif. "Visitors will have full access to Yosemite Valley via [California] 120," a park statement issued Friday says. "However, due to continued fire activity in the area stopping along the roadway is strictly prohibited.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2013 | By Joseph Serna and Diana Marcum
GROVELAND, Calif. - Authorities opened the western section of California 120 into Yosemite National Park on Friday, more than two weeks after closing the road to fight the fast-spreading Rim fire. Visitors will have full access to Yosemite Valley from the park's western entrance from Groveland for the first time since the Rim fire broke out Aug. 17. Though a 14-mile stretch of the highway is closed within the park - from Crane Flat to White Wolf - the update was met with joy Friday.
OPINION
September 6, 2013 | By Jamie Simons
After years of living in Yosemite National Park, I learned that, contrary to the teachings of Smokey Bear, fire can be a welcome force for good. It rejuvenates the forest. It clears the way for richer, more diverse habitat. It is essential in the life cycle of the giant sequoia. And if you live in the mountains, surrounded by forests piled high with tinderbox-dry debris, nothing helps you sleep more soundly at night than being in an area that's been burned. What isn't good is a fire like the Rim fire, which as of Thursday had burned 237,341 acres, or 370 square miles, in and around Yosemite.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
The Rim fire near Yosemite was started by a hunter who lost control of his campfire, investigators from the U.S. Forest Service and the Tuolumne County district attorney's office said Thursday. The blaze, which erupted in the Stanislaus National Forest north of the Tuolumne River on Aug. 17, has burned 370 square miles of national forest and parkland and destroyed 111 buildings, including 11 homes and three businesses. The cost of fighting the fire reached $81 million Thursday. “It was intended as a campfire, then for whatever reason, if it was put out improperly or left unattended … it got out of control,” said Forest Service spokesman Ray Mooney.
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