Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsYoung Actor
IN THE NEWS

Young Actor

ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2009 | Regina Marler, Marler is the editor of "Queer Beats: How the Beats Turned America on to Sex."
A man walks down a pier on the Jersey shore alone at night, leans on a decrepit railing and falls through into the black waves below. Just as his strength gives out, he feels a pair of arms around him -- a rescue. He owes his life to another man. This strange debt -- analyzed, negotiated, shirked -- is the molten center of Valerie Martin's subtle but intense seventh novel, "The Confessions of Edward Day." Set in New York theatrical circles in the 1970s, it follows an ambitious young actor, Day, as he tries to make his name even as he's dogged at every step by his look-alike rival, Guy Margate, who happened to have once saved Edward's life.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2001 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After the sudden death of her beloved husband, Philadelphia widow Liz Donovan discovers that she's financially strapped: inexplicably, hubby had secretly used the couple's life savings to buy an island off the coast of Maine. A rather strange island too.
NEWS
April 18, 1991 | MARY ANNE PEREZ, SPECIAL TO NUESTRO TIEMPO
A 14-year-old actor and singer from East Los Angeles has made it to prime time and hopes to continue progressing in the entertainment business. Rigoberto Jimenez Jr., a ninth-grader at Belvedere Junior High School, plays a character named Rigo on the ABC sitcom "Davis Rules," starring Randy Quaid and Jonathan Winters. Rigo's character--the producers liked his real name so much they kept it for the show--is a student in an ethnically diverse school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1985 | PATT MORRISON, Times Staff Writer
Even for a talented son of a bitch with wavy hair and brown eyes, Hollywood is one tough town. They put him to work when he was a year old. They changed his name. When he finally got his big break out of TV commercials, he had to play second fiddle to a performer whose stature was, frankly, inferior to his own. He turned down one starring film role that would have ruined his "nice-guy" image.
NEWS
June 3, 1990
Winners of College Hospital's 4th annual Safe and Sober Awards were announced recently at a luncheon hosted by Will Gotay of the movie "Stand and Deliver," Marisa Ryan of the TV show "Major Dad" and Darius McCrary of the TV series "Family Matters." Assemblyman Bob Epple made presentations to the winning schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1986 | SEBASTIAN DORTCH, Times Staff Writer
It's play rehearsal time at Sherman Elementary School in Southeast San Diego. Light illuminates the small stage in the darkened auditorium. Tommy is eating with his father at Zippy's Pizza, a family celebration except that one member, Tommy's older brother, is not there. "I wonder what Johnny is doing?" he asks his Dad. "Probably out having fun, like us," his father responds. "Yeah, like us," Tommy says. But across town Johnny is smoking a joint laced with PCP. Death is approaching.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1987 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
The spotlight's on you. You're 10 years old, wearing make-up and a funny costume, on stage in front of 300 people, mostly strangers. You have to sing, dance, handle props, be funny, hit your marks and get your cues. And, you have to look like you're enjoying it. If you're a member of South Coast Repertory's Young Conservatory Players--non-professional kids ages 8-18--chances are you will succeed. Classes at the Conservatory start Sept. 12. A production of "Charlotte's Web" begins Nov. 14.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1990 | MICHAEL ARKUSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dion Luther is 0 for 15--15 auditions for acting jobs since graduating last May from California Institute of the Arts, and no work. So Luther, along with eight other aspiring actors from the CalArts class of '89, have found a remedy for rejection, a chance to polish their talent while waiting for a career breakthrough. Last fall, they formed the Santa Clarita Repertory Theatre, which tonight and tomorrow will present "The Frog Prince" by David Mamet and "Spring Dance" by Horton Foote at CalArts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2008 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Iris Burton, a dancer turned Hollywood agent who worked primarily with child actors and helped launch the careers of many young talents, including River Phoenix and Henry Thomas, died Saturday at the Motion Picture and Television Country House and Hospital in Woodland Hills. She was 77. The immediate cause was pneumonia. Burton also had Alzheimer's disease, according to movie producer David Permut, a longtime friend.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2009 | John Horn
Determined to make the rags-to-riches drama "Slumdog Millionaire" as authentic as possible, director Danny Boyle reworked his film's first act, casting Hindi-speaking children from Mumbai's slums in two lead roles. Now his choice to put the impoverished 7-year-olds into the film has sparked a growing controversy that is threatening to overtake the movie's global goodwill.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|