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Young Adult Fiction

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2001 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anne Snyder, a prize-winning author of young-adult fiction whose novels confronted alcoholism, homelessness, sexuality and other real-life dilemmas, died Feb. 2 at a San Juan Capistrano hospice. She was 78 and had Alzheimer's disease. Snyder wrote 17 books, including "50,000 Names for Jeff," "My Name Is Davy--I'm an Alcoholic" and "First Step." Like other novelists who specialized in young-adult reality fiction, she did not believe in sheltering children from perplexing social issues.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
From Harry Potter to Bella Swan to Katniss Everdeen, the hottest phenomenon in publishing these days is young adult fiction about risk takers who dare to go their own way. So it's more than a little ironic, if predictable, that films made from these books are completely risk aversive. Why rock the boat and jeopardize a potentially huge franchise if you don't really have to? "Divergent" is the latest, most snug-fitting version of that trend. As directed by Neil Burger ("The Illusionist," "Limitless")
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BUSINESS
March 27, 2012 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
The back-to-back blockbuster successes of "Harry Potter," "Twilight" and now "The Hunger Games" have turned the hunt for fresh young-adult fiction white-hot in Hollywood, as studios try to turn what used to be a phenomenon into what might be a formula. Frenzied auctions are underway for books that haven't even been published. Studios are paying as much as $1 million for the rights to adapt titles that are relatively modest sellers, particularly those featuring science-fiction, fantasy and dystopian themes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Endings can be hard. When Tahereh Mafi's “Ignite Me” publishes today, it'll bring her bestselling young adult "Shatter Me" series to a close. Mafi is entirely confident in her choices, but she's also aware that her books are more than art objects -- they're in conversation with her readers, including the devoted Mafi Mafia . Here are some thoughts from Mafi on her books and writing. Her book tour begins later this month, with an appearance at Barnes & Noble at the Grove Feb. 24 at 7 p.m. Did you know you were going to be a writer when you were in school?
BOOKS
September 12, 1999 | MARC ARONSON, Marc Aronson is the author of "Art Attack, A Short Cultural History of the Avant-Garde (Clarion)" and the forthcoming "Sir Walter Ralegh and the Quest for El Dorado" and "What Is Young Adult and What Does it Matter?" He is a senior editor at Henry Holt
With the spate of school shootings that culminated in Littleton, Colo., the panics over the raising of girls, then boys and the success of adolescent-oriented movies and TV shows, teenagers have erupted into the national consciousness. Whether as a crisis or as a golden revenue stream, they are suddenly all over the media. Moreover, just as we adults adjust to the digitalizing of our world, we sense that young people are almost a different species, bred to flourish in a multimedia environment.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2008 | Preston Williams, Williams is a writer at the Washington Post.
Here's all you need to know about Chris Crutcher, whose young-adult fiction is set against a high school sports backdrop and is a hit with jocks and non-jocks, not to mention readers and supposed nonreaders: During the morning sessions of an all-day appearance at Strasburg (Va.) High School recently, students approached Crutcher on three occasions and paused while tears welled in their eyes as they talked to him. That's how much his books reflect their lives. Although Crutcher, 62, has no children, he said that knack comes in part from years of working as a director of an alternative school and as a family therapist dealing with child abuse and neglect cases.
NEWS
January 25, 1994 | IRENE LACHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Paul Zindel never set out to make cultural history. So he was as surprised as anyone when he ended up a hero in the literary potboiler that became known as young adult fiction. That chapter in Zindel's career opened in the mid-'60s, when his Pulitzer Prize-winning play, "The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-In-The-Moon Marigolds," was making a splash in theatrical circles. One of the zillions who saw it was Charlotte Zolotow, a legendary editor and author at Harper & Row.
NEWS
March 11, 2000
Adrienne Jones, 84, who wrote 15 novels for young adults, including the award-winning "Street Family." Jones, a native of Atlanta, decided to become a writer after her second-grade teacher praised some of her verses and published them in the school paper. She grew up in Hollywood and Beverly Hills and studied fiction at UCLA and UC Irvine. Her first novel, "Thunderbird Pass," was published in 1952 by J.B. Lippincott.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2012
Readers of young adult fiction have more choices than ever before. Still, just as adults are "reading down," many teens are also "reading up. " What does that mean? Some teens are turning to titles intended for adults that feature young protagonists. Stormdancer By Jay Kristoff Thomas Dunne Books, 336 pp.: $24.99 The kickoff to a new fantasy series is dystopian steam punk set in feudal Japan with a strong female lead. (September) The Yellow Birds By Kevin Powers Little, Brown, 240 pp.: $24.99 Two young American soldiers struggle to protect each other from insurgents, fatigue and other perils of the Iraq War. (September)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2013 | By Denise Florez
Be careful what you wish for. That was the lesson imparted by young-adult authors during a Sunday morning panel titled "Modern Cinderella Stories" at the L.A. Times Festival of Books . Audience members braved the early heat at the Young Adult Stage to listen to Jessica Morgan and Heather Cocks, authors of “Messy,” the follow-up book to “Spoiled.” They tell the story of Molly Dix, who after her mother dies discovers that her father...
NEWS
September 26, 2012 | By David Ulin, Times Book Critic
It's hardly shocking that the most fully realized characters in "The Casual Vacancy," J.K. Rowling's first novel for adults, are the youngest. Fats Wall, Krystal Weedon, Gaia Bawden, Andrew Price, Sukhvinder Jawanda: Even the names are vaguely reminiscent of those in her “Harry Potter” series, and when “The Casual Vacancy” focuses on these teenagers and their interactions (with one another, with their parents, with the petty hypocrisies of...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling
As Hollywood continues its quest to find the next "Hunger Games," New Line Cinema has acquired the rights to Maggie Stiefvater's young adult novel "The Raven Boys," with Akiva Goldsman ("A Beautiful Mind") on board to produce. The book, which is set for release Sept. 18, is the first title in the four-book "Raven Cycle" series, which  centers on sensible 16-year-old Blue Sargent. The offspring of psychic parents, Blue didn't inherit their higher-level gifts, but something is unusual about the girl: She's been told that if she kisses her true love, he will die. Although she's steered clear of the opposite sex, she meets two high-schoolers, nicknamed the Raven Boys, at a pizza parlor where she works part time.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2012
Readers of young adult fiction have more choices than ever before. Still, just as adults are "reading down," many teens are also "reading up. " What does that mean? Some teens are turning to titles intended for adults that feature young protagonists. Stormdancer By Jay Kristoff Thomas Dunne Books, 336 pp.: $24.99 The kickoff to a new fantasy series is dystopian steam punk set in feudal Japan with a strong female lead. (September) The Yellow Birds By Kevin Powers Little, Brown, 240 pp.: $24.99 Two young American soldiers struggle to protect each other from insurgents, fatigue and other perils of the Iraq War. (September)
BUSINESS
March 27, 2012 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
The back-to-back blockbuster successes of "Harry Potter," "Twilight" and now "The Hunger Games" have turned the hunt for fresh young-adult fiction white-hot in Hollywood, as studios try to turn what used to be a phenomenon into what might be a formula. Frenzied auctions are underway for books that haven't even been published. Studios are paying as much as $1 million for the rights to adapt titles that are relatively modest sellers, particularly those featuring science-fiction, fantasy and dystopian themes.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2010 | By Sonja Bolle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In young-adult fiction, look for the fall to squeeze every last drop of — excuse the expression — blood out of the vampire and supernatural creature trend. We've seen werewolves, ghosts, warrior fairies, zombies … where can we go next? Well, into younger age groups, for one. With her new novel "Radiance" (Square Fish/Feiwel and Friends, ages 9-12), for example, Alyson Noël spins off a new series about the ghostly younger sister from her "Immortals" books for ages 12 and older.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2010 | By Sonja Bolle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In young-adult fiction, look for the fall to squeeze every last drop of — excuse the expression — blood out of the vampire and supernatural creature trend. We've seen werewolves, ghosts, warrior fairies, zombies … where can we go next? Well, into younger age groups, for one. With her new novel "Radiance" (Square Fish/Feiwel and Friends, ages 9-12), for example, Alyson Noël spins off a new series about the ghostly younger sister from her "Immortals" books for ages 12 and older.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling
As Hollywood continues its quest to find the next "Hunger Games," New Line Cinema has acquired the rights to Maggie Stiefvater's young adult novel "The Raven Boys," with Akiva Goldsman ("A Beautiful Mind") on board to produce. The book, which is set for release Sept. 18, is the first title in the four-book "Raven Cycle" series, which  centers on sensible 16-year-old Blue Sargent. The offspring of psychic parents, Blue didn't inherit their higher-level gifts, but something is unusual about the girl: She's been told that if she kisses her true love, he will die. Although she's steered clear of the opposite sex, she meets two high-schoolers, nicknamed the Raven Boys, at a pizza parlor where she works part time.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2008 | Preston Williams, Williams is a writer at the Washington Post.
Here's all you need to know about Chris Crutcher, whose young-adult fiction is set against a high school sports backdrop and is a hit with jocks and non-jocks, not to mention readers and supposed nonreaders: During the morning sessions of an all-day appearance at Strasburg (Va.) High School recently, students approached Crutcher on three occasions and paused while tears welled in their eyes as they talked to him. That's how much his books reflect their lives. Although Crutcher, 62, has no children, he said that knack comes in part from years of working as a director of an alternative school and as a family therapist dealing with child abuse and neglect cases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2006 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Maureen Daly McGivern, who pioneered the young adult novel with "Seventeenth Summer," a teenage coming-of-age story published in 1942, has died. She was 85. She died Monday at a hospice in Palm Desert. The cause was non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, her sister, Sheila Daly White, said this week. The "spiritual grandmother" of the young adult fiction genre, Daly, who used her maiden name professionally, wrote several novels for teenagers as well as short stories and nonfiction works.
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