Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsYouth Crime
IN THE NEWS

Youth Crime

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1996
Re "The Coming Mayhem," by Richard Rodriguez, Opinion, Jan. 21: To imply that we are largely facing monsters in our own children is not only irresponsible, it promotes the very kind of mass hysteria this country seems to be falling for. We should not be so quick to label our youth, but rather search for truth and answers to real problems. Problems not nearly as outlandish or pervasive as Rodriguez claims. There are millions of decent, law-abiding, enthusiastic children in our homes and our schools.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 8, 2014 | By Robert Greene
The documentary " Kids for Cash " breezed in and out of Los Angeles so quickly last month that there was little buzz (far too little) about just what the real crime was that the film depicted. That's a shame, because it's such an important story. Fortunately, the film now is set to be screened in the U.S. Capitol Visitor Center in a program hosted by Rep. Tony Cardenas (D-Los Angeles) and Sen. Robert Casey (D-Pa.), and later this month and next at spots around Southern California.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1995 | LISA M. BOWMAN
On the heels of a stabbing near Westlake High School, Thousand Oaks law enforcement officials tonight will offer a forum on public safety and youth crime. Representatives from the Ventura County sheriff's crime prevention unit and the court system will answer questions on youth violence at the forum, which is titled "Juvenile Offenders in the Justice System."
NEWS
December 2, 2007 | Sharon Cohen, Associated Press
A generation after America decided to get tough on kids who commit crimes -- sometimes locking them up for life -- the tide may be turning. States are rethinking and, in some cases, retooling juvenile sentencing laws. They're responding to new research on the adolescent brain, and studies indicating that teens sent to adult court end up worse off than those who aren't: They get in trouble more often, they do it faster and the offenses are more serious.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1998 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR
The City Council voted Monday night to apply for a $345,000 state grant to establish a program that would help tackle juvenile crime. Called the Innovative Local Law Enforcement and Community Policing Program, it would bring together police, schools, probation authorities and other city and county departments, businesses and volunteers in an effort to deter youth crime.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1996 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
In an effort to curb youth crime in the area, the Lost Hills Sheriff's Station's Juvenile Intervention Team will offer classes for parents and guardians of at-risk youngsters to give them the tools to turn their children around. The morning-long classes--the first of which will be held at the Calabasas station Sept. 28--are an effort to alert parents to the warning signs of criminal behavior and teach them ways to help prevent problems.
NEWS
February 9, 1996 | SHERI L. WASSENAAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crimes committed by America's youth lead the list of problems that are becoming increasingly acute for cities across the country, according to a nationwide survey released Thursday by the National League of Cities. Of more than 400 city officials participating in the survey, 62% said that youth crime became more severe in 1995, placing it at the top of 26 issues of concern to municipal leaders. Youth crime also was cited as the problem that has worsened most over the last five years.
NEWS
April 2, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Atty. Gen. William P. Barr called for tougher punishment of juvenile offenders to reduce violent crime. Addressing the Wisconsin Governor's Conference on juvenile crime, drugs and gangs, Barr urged changing the system to allow authorities to reach troubled youths earlier. He called for strengthening the family and schools, and reversing governmental policies, such as welfare programs, that he said discourage marriage and reward illegitimate parenthood.
OPINION
January 16, 2000 | FRANKLIN E. ZIMRING, Franklin E. Zimring teaches law at UC Berkeley's Boalt Hall and is the author of "American Youth Violence" (Oxford University Press, 1998)
The collection of "tough on crime" proposals that was assembled into Proposition 21 on the March 2000 ballot may not be the most draconian crime legislation in recent California history, but it is certainly the most peculiar. From "three strikes" in 1994 to "10-20-life" in 1996 to victims' rights in the 1980s, every other recent crime proposal to take center stage in California was based on a single problem and a specific strategy for addressing it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1996
Although the overwhelming majority of young people are law-abiding, crime experts agree that already escalating youth crime will rise even further as the current generation of adolescents grows older. The so-called "superpredators" among young Americans pose a new dilemma for lawmakers: How should society respond to young people who commit violence, even homicide, while at the same time it acts to deter such crimes? A new report by the Rand Corp.
NEWS
September 2, 2007 | Amy Jeffries, Associated Press
Half a dozen teenagers are leading scruffy dogs through a slalom of orange plastic cones in the worn asphalt yard of a veterinary clinic. The dogs have been rescued from nearby townships; the kids, from South Africa's criminal justice system. The teens started coming to the clinic run by Community Led Animal Welfare on Saturday mornings in late April after being arrested for theft, assault or other minor offenses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2005 | Wendy Thermos, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County would have about 3,300 fewer high school dropouts annually and nearly 10,000 fewer criminal cases filed against juveniles each year if publicly funded preschool were available in California, according to a new report from the Rand Corp. Every other populous region of the state would see similar benefits, said the Rand study, which is being released today and would for the first time quantify the benefits of universal preschool.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2003 | Anna Gorman, Times Staff Writer
A 14-year-old girl began an online conversation with a Los Angeles County man, who lured her to a meeting and then molested her. Two Pasadena teachers seduced two female students by sending sexually explicit e-mails. These real-life cases are described on a new Web site launched by the Los Angeles County district attorney's office to prevent children from becoming victims over the Internet. The site, which will be formally introduced today by Dist. Atty.
OPINION
December 15, 2002 | Mike Males, Mike Males, senior researcher for the Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice, teaches sociology at UC Santa Cruz.
The murder rate in Los Angeles is up. And a new report from Choices for Youth and the California Wellness Foundation suggests why -- youth violence. "This is an epidemic" involving youths ages 10 through 17, said Choices for Youth director Laurie Kappe. Los Angeles Police Department Deputy Chief Ronald Bergmann urged more "aggressive curfew and truancy enforcement" to take "young victims" and "possible [suspects] off the streets." Deputy City Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2002 | TIMOTHY HUGHES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tipped off that two rival gangs were planning a combined attack on their downtown headquarters, Santa Paula police went on tactical alert, hunkered down and waited for what might come. An informant told police that gangs wanted to firebomb the city's small station and spray it with machine-gun fire--an act of revenge for the shooting of one of their own by federal agents during a drug bust.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2001 | MICHAEL KRIKORIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shortly after winning a fistfight at San Fernando High School, SantanaMarie Flores was arrested on suspicion of assault, handcuffed and on her way to the police station. The parents of the 16-year-old were summoned. At the Los Angeles Police Department's Foothill Division station, an officer was left with a judgment call: Should the teenager be put through the justice system, or could she be salvaged?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2001 | CATHERINE SAILLANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to curb youth crime, Ventura County will use a $2.8-million state grant to open centers in Ventura, Oxnard and Simi Valley where juveniles on probation can be more tightly supervised and receive counseling and other services. The money will also pay for a second county prosecutor who can haul parents of habitual truants into court and for additional probation officers to control gang-plagued neighborhoods in Oxnard and Santa Paula. But with the stick comes a few carrots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2001 | Jessica Garrison
The Orange County Grand Jury called on the county Friday to spend more on intervention programs to keep teenagers from getting into trouble. And, to accommodate those who do, the grand jury advised adding beds to juvenile detention facilities. Grand Juror Ray Gott, a former juvenile justice officer who was chairman of the committee that wrote the report, said, "We're advocating that monies be identified or reallocated to do delinquency prevention."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2001 | CATHERINE SAILLANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to curb youth crime, Ventura County will use a $2.8-million state grant to open centers in Ventura, Oxnard and Simi Valley where juveniles on probation can be more tightly supervised and receive counseling and other services. The money will also pay for a second county prosecutor who can haul parents of habitual truants into court and for additional probation officers to control gang-plagued neighborhoods in Oxnard and Santa Paula. But with the stick comes a few carrots.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|