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NATIONAL
October 12, 2013 | By Nicole Radzievich and Pamela Lehman
The tiny coal town of Gilberton has become a spectacle for the nation's gun debate, marshaling dozens of armed gun-rights activists who come to defend the borough's suspended police chief, whose profanity-laced YouTube videos sparked the controversy. At four meetings in as many months, the backers of Chief Mark Kessler showed their support by packing - they came to disciplinary hearings bristling with semiautomatic rifles and handguns. Several slung rifles over their shoulders, others holstered them on their hips or beneath clothing.
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BUSINESS
August 12, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Ever stopped to wonder how many other people might have just Liked a post on Facebook, searched for something on Google or tweeted at the same time as you? There's a website that purportedly shows you what that looks like. One Second on the Internet is a website that visually demonstrates just how busy the Internet may be every single second. PHOTOS: Six things rich tech execs splurge on The site starts by showing that every second a little fewer than 200 votes are cast on Reddit, but as users scroll down, Internet activity becomes far more expansive.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2013 | By Amy Nicholson
Marie (Charlotte Lebon) and Thomas (Raphaël Personnaz) are a terrifically attractive French couple until she dumps him - rightfully - after five years because they're no closer to a better apartment, wedding ring or a baby. To get Thomas over his heartbreak, loutish best friend Paul (Jérôme Commandeur) introduces him to "The Stroller Strategy," i.e. buy a baby seat for your car and cruise around picking up vulnerable single mothers. But Thomas doesn't need the prop. A real baby falls - literally - into his hands after its own vulnerable single mother falls down the stairs and has to spend five days in a medically induced coma.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2013 | By Kelly Corrigan
For Kate Friedricks, a Tujunga resident who grew up in Glendale and taught herself to play the ukulele as a girl, the instrument has become an addictive mode of expression that keeps her up at night playing song after song. All it takes, she says, is a quality ukulele and the Internet for her to put off sleep. “You get a good ukulele and you go online, and you just keep downloading all these wonderful songs, and it's midnight and you say, 'I really should have gone to bed an hour ago. But just one more.'” On the third Saturday of every month, Friedricks leads an ever-changing group of ukulele players who drive from near and far to play together, regardless of their skill level or how long they've been playing.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Google researchers and Stanford scientists have discovered that if you show a large enough computing system millions of images from random YouTube videos for three days, the computer will teach itself to recognize ... cats. That may sound inconsequential at best and downright ridiculous at worst -- but in fact, it is very important. The research shows that if a computer is big enough, and programmed correctly, it can learn to make sense of random, unlabeled data, in just days without any help from humans.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Many musicians and wannabe stars have enjoyed posting on YouTube their own versions of singer-songwriter Jason Mraz's first international hit, "I'm Yours. " Trouble was, Mraz had no quick and easy way to find those versions and collect royalties. Now he may have found a solution. Audiam Inc., which launched overseas last month and in the U.S. on Wednesday, searches YouTube for people using Mraz's copyrighted songs and collects part of the advertising revenue generated by those clips, under an agreement with YouTube.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2011 | By Nathan Olivarez-Giles, Los Angeles Times
Google Inc. has launched an online tool that allows users to search for people or provide information about someone who may be missing as a result of the earthquake in Japan. Person Finder, which has been used in previous disasters, is a central database that individuals, governments and aid agencies can tap to find people and gather information about their condition. The 8.9-magnitude earthquake set off a massive tsunami and may have killed hundreds of people. Photos: Scenes from the earthquake Google launched Person Finder after the Haiti earthquake and most recently deployed the tool for the Christchurch earthquake, a 6.3 temblor that struck the New Zealand city Feb. 22. As of midday Friday, more than 7,200 queries had been recorded on Person Finder, which is available in Japanese and English.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2012 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
Maker Studios, the digital media company behind some of the most successful channels on YouTube, has raised $36 million in an investment round led by Time Warner Investments and joined by some of the best-known names in the entertainment industry. Other participants include Greycroft Partners; actor Robert Downey Jr.'s investment company, Downey Ventures; British television executive Elisabeth Murdoch; M+C, the investment company of former News Corp. digital chief Jon Miller and Jimmy Yaffe; and "Avatar" producer Jon Landau.
NEWS
February 21, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
YouTube videos that show teens deliberately cutting and injuring themselves are viewed by millions of online watchers -- something a new study suggests might make these disturbing acts seem mainstream and normal. The study, published online Monday in the journal Pediatrics, notes that nonsuicidal self-injury -- cutting or physically hurting oneself in some way -- consistently appears in about 14% to 24% percent of children, teens and young adults. Researchers studied the top 100 videos of such acts on YouTube and found they had received more than 2 million page views.
NATIONAL
April 9, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga
SEATTLE - A broken leg. A shattered ankle. A broken arm. A fractured eye socket. And a memory of terror that will be with her forever, its soundtrack an "unexplainable" noise "that will never get out of my head. " That is what Amanda Skorjanc, 25, remembers after the March 22 Oso landslide that destroyed her home, almost wiped her little town off the map and nearly killed her infant son, Duke Suddarth, who was 22 weeks old when the disaster struck. At least 36 people were killed and 10 others remain missing.
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