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BUSINESS
October 24, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Cat video aficionados know him as Henri Le Chat Noir, an existentialist cat who muses about the meaninglessness of life in a popular series of YouTube videos. But don't be fooled by the vacant stares and the bored looks of disgust. Strip away the undulating piano music and the melancholy French voice-over and what you get is a cat named Henry staring blankly at the camera, usually because filmmaker William Braden is trying every trick in the book to get his attention. A few weeks ago, I flew up to Seattle to meet Braden, a former wedding videographer turned professional cat video maker, and his feline muse.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2013 | By Kelly Corrigan
For Kate Friedricks, a Tujunga resident who grew up in Glendale and taught herself to play the ukulele as a girl, the instrument has become an addictive mode of expression that keeps her up at night playing song after song. All it takes, she says, is a quality ukulele and the Internet for her to put off sleep. “You get a good ukulele and you go online, and you just keep downloading all these wonderful songs, and it's midnight and you say, 'I really should have gone to bed an hour ago. But just one more.'” On the third Saturday of every month, Friedricks leads an ever-changing group of ukulele players who drive from near and far to play together, regardless of their skill level or how long they've been playing.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Google researchers and Stanford scientists have discovered that if you show a large enough computing system millions of images from random YouTube videos for three days, the computer will teach itself to recognize ... cats. That may sound inconsequential at best and downright ridiculous at worst -- but in fact, it is very important. The research shows that if a computer is big enough, and programmed correctly, it can learn to make sense of random, unlabeled data, in just days without any help from humans.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Many musicians and wannabe stars have enjoyed posting on YouTube their own versions of singer-songwriter Jason Mraz's first international hit, "I'm Yours. " Trouble was, Mraz had no quick and easy way to find those versions and collect royalties. Now he may have found a solution. Audiam Inc., which launched overseas last month and in the U.S. on Wednesday, searches YouTube for people using Mraz's copyrighted songs and collects part of the advertising revenue generated by those clips, under an agreement with YouTube.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2013 | By Amy Nicholson
Marie (Charlotte Lebon) and Thomas (Raphaël Personnaz) are a terrifically attractive French couple until she dumps him - rightfully - after five years because they're no closer to a better apartment, wedding ring or a baby. To get Thomas over his heartbreak, loutish best friend Paul (Jérôme Commandeur) introduces him to "The Stroller Strategy," i.e. buy a baby seat for your car and cruise around picking up vulnerable single mothers. But Thomas doesn't need the prop. A real baby falls - literally - into his hands after its own vulnerable single mother falls down the stairs and has to spend five days in a medically induced coma.
NEWS
February 21, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
YouTube videos that show teens deliberately cutting and injuring themselves are viewed by millions of online watchers -- something a new study suggests might make these disturbing acts seem mainstream and normal. The study, published online Monday in the journal Pediatrics, notes that nonsuicidal self-injury -- cutting or physically hurting oneself in some way -- consistently appears in about 14% to 24% percent of children, teens and young adults. Researchers studied the top 100 videos of such acts on YouTube and found they had received more than 2 million page views.
BUSINESS
April 15, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
If you long for the days of speckled images and crackling sounds, head to YouTube because it's now letting users relive the era of cassette tapes with a "VHS mode. " The new mode, which will only be around for one day, gives YouTube videos a shaky feel and grainy look -- reminiscent of what the images on a VHS tape would look like after being played too often. At times, the bottom right of the image curves inward, distorting the picture, and if you hit pause, the whole video starts to shake.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
Did you know that you probably spent more than a full day online in May? And you were probably spending a good portion of that time somewhere on Google, checking out a news site or watching hours and hours of YouTube videos. On average, the nearly 212 million Americans online last month spent about 29 hours browsing the Web, according to Nielsen . An average of just under six hours of that time was spent watching videos -- more than 26 billion videos. [Updated, 2:32 p.m. June 22: The brand with the biggest draw was Google, pulling in 173 million unique visitors.
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