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October 24, 2012 | Deborah Netburn
Henry is a difficult star, but filmmaker William Braden knows how to work with him. If he needs Henry to run, Braden stands behind him and shouts to scare him into action. If he wants Henry to look annoyed, Braden blows in his face. If Henry won't cooperate, Braden bribes him with catnip and Friskies Party Mix. Over the last six years, Braden and Henry have developed a special relationship. Braden makes YouTube videos in which Henry plays a French existentialist named Henri. The two-minute videos of the fluffy black cat with particularly long whiskers are Internet sensations, viewed more than 10 million times.
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BUSINESS
October 24, 2012 | Deborah Netburn
Henry is a difficult star, but filmmaker William Braden knows how to work with him. If he needs Henry to run, Braden stands behind him and shouts to scare him into action. If he wants Henry to look annoyed, Braden blows in his face. If Henry won't cooperate, Braden bribes him with catnip and Friskies Party Mix. Over the last six years, Braden and Henry have developed a special relationship. Braden makes YouTube videos in which Henry plays a French existentialist named Henri. The two-minute videos of the fluffy black cat with particularly long whiskers are Internet sensations, viewed more than 10 million times.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2008 | John L. Mitchell, Times Staff Writer
Around the world, the "Carson City Council Smack" has taken on a life of its own. It happened last year when Vera Robles DeWitt, a former mayor and longtime community activist, bopped a city commissioner on the back of the head with a handful of papers as she passed her in the council chambers. The moment was caught on a 43-second video clip that spread, via YouTube, like wildfire.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2010 | By Ben Fritz
The world's most popular free video website is getting into the pay-per-view business. Google Inc.'s YouTube announced Wednesday that it will make movies from the 2009 and 2010 Sundance film festivals available for online rental. It's the first time that YouTube, which historically has offered its video free, will charge users. Offering a pay service is a clear sign that Google, which has struggled to make a profitable business out of YouTube after buying it in 2006 for $1.65 billion, is looking for new ways to monetize the service.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2006 | Richard Rushfield and Claire Hoffman, Times Staff Writers
Lonelygirl15 appears to be an innocent, home-schooled 16-year-old, pouring her heart out for her video camera in the privacy of her bedroom. But since May, her brief posts on the video-sharing site YouTube and the social networking hub MySpace have launched a Web mystery eagerly followed by her million-plus viewers: Who is this sheltered ingenue who calls herself "Bree," and is she in some sort of danger -- or, worse, the tool of some giant marketing machine?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2007 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
PEOPLE endlessly complain that Hollywood is full of dopey, superficial films bereft of anything new to say. And they're right. Anyone looking for art that is edgy or relevant -- and inspires comment -- is turning to Internet video, which has become the true engine driving our pop culture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2007 | Larry Gordon and Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writers
No wonder YouTube is so popular. All the effort to boost children's self-esteem may have backfired and produced a generation of college students who are more narcissistic than their Gen X predecessors, according to a new study led by a San Diego State University psychologist. And the Internet, with all its MySpace and YouTube braggadocio, is letting that self-regard blossom even more, said the analysis, titled "Egos Inflating Over Time."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2008 | Victoria Kim, Times Staff Writer
On a sunny May afternoon, teenagers dismissed from a Beverly Hills middle school gathered outside a restaurant four blocks away and gossiped about their friends. Amid lots of giggling, the conversation among the eighth-graders touched on the prom and limousines but was dominated by an unflattering assessment of a girl at school, who was called a "spoiled brat" and a "slut." "I don't hate her, it's just, I wouldn't prefer to hang out with her for a million years," one girl declared.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2008 | Andrew Blankstein
The graffiti artist who gained notoriety on YouTube with his daredevil tagging exploits pleaded guilty today to nearly three dozen felony vandalism counts and was released from jail after serving time since last May, prosecutors said. Cyrus Yazdani, one of Los Angeles' most prolific taggers, who is known in the tagging world as "Buket," admitted to 32 counts with the special allegation that damage exceeded $50,000. Judge Steven J.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2007 | David Sarno, Times Staff Writer
Many of the most explosive and virulent online videos -- think: "Star Wars Kid," "Numa Numa" and the recent interpretation of "Thriller" by Filipino prisoners -- manage to be at once bizarre, hypnotic and borderline upsetting. Tay Zonday's new hit YouTube song, "Chocolate Rain," is no exception. "Chocolate raiiiiiin," belts Zonday again and again, in a voice so cavernously deep that it couldn't possibly be coming from the skinny, sweet-faced young boy on the screen (he's actually 25).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2010 | By David G. Savage
The lawyers defending California's Proposition 8 and its ban on same-sex marriage urged the U.S. Supreme Court on Saturday to block video coverage of this week's trial in San Francisco. The attorneys filed an emergency appeal with Justice Anthony M. Kennedy and argued that their client's right to a fair trial would be jeopardized if each day's proceedings were posted on YouTube.com. The trial "has the potential to become a media circus," wrote attorney Charles Cooper. "The record is already replete with evidence showing that any publicizing of support for Prop.
BUSINESS
December 24, 2009 | By David Colker
The YouTube video from Shorewood High School in Washington state looks normal when it starts. It's a lip dub -- a lip sync of a song done in a single take with numerous students taking part -- of the infectious Hall & Oates tune, "You Make My Dreams." There are numerous lip dubs online, and this one is pretty much like any other, beginning with an enthusiastic girl running through the halls of the school, mouthing the words. But there are some odd things going on. Some students around her are doing impossible-looking acrobatics as the camera passes by. Objects fly up from the floor.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2009 | Todd Martens
U2's concert at the Rose Bowl shattered attendance records at the venue as more than 100,000 people, including Rose Bowl staff, took in the band's Southern California stop on its 360 Tour, according to the venue's general manager, Darryl Dunn. Yet the number of fans who watched the concert online probably dwarfs that tally. Final figures aren't in yet from Google-owned YouTube, which streamed the concert live, but the page housing the concert has received close to 7 million "channel views."
BUSINESS
September 30, 2009 | Dawn C. Chmielewski
Music videos from Green Day, Jay-Z and Linkin Park will begin reappearing on YouTube as soon as December, the result of a multiyear agreement reached with Warner Music Group Corp. The Internet's dominant video site and one of the world's largest music companies had been locked in a dispute over the value of music videos, some of the most popular content on YouTube, whose young viewers are coveted by advertisers. Licensing talks reached an impasse late last year, resulting in Warner's videos being pulled from the site.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2009 | Dawn C. Chmielewski and David Sarno
The most popular site for watching video on the Internet may soon get Hollywood's most popular movies. Google Inc.'s YouTube is in talks with several major studios -- including Sony Pictures, Warner Bros. and Lionsgate -- about streaming movies when the DVDs become available in rental stores and kiosks, according to sources familiar with the situation. The move represents a bold gambit for the entertainment giants, which have been cautious in embracing the Internet out of fear it would disrupt relationships with major retailers and undercut lucrative DVD sales.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2009 | Dawn C. Chmielewski
U2 lead singer Bono, well known for his ONE campaign against poverty, has turned his focus to a charity case closer to home: the ailing music industry. The rocker is credited with bringing together Universal Music Group, the world's biggest music company, and YouTube, Google Inc.'s online video site, for talks that on Thursday resulted in a partnership to launch a music video service featuring professionally produced content from the label's big-name acts.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2008 | DAVID SARNO
One the surface, Weezer's quirky new "Pork and Beans" video, which has helped create a wave of buzz for the band's new album, is just another example of how to make a good viral video. You take an idea that people are going to talk about, mix in some famous faces, throw in an embarassing moment or two, and watch as your firework climbs, explodes, and inevitably fades out. But "Pork and Beans" is more than just another drop in the viral bucket.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2009 | Dawn C. Chmielewski
Walt Disney Co., seeking to broaden the audience for its broadcast and cable shows on the Internet's most popular video site, struck a deal Monday with Google Inc.'s YouTube to distribute short-form content from ESPN and ABC. The agreement would extend the Internet reach for ESPN's sports highlights and ABC News updates and provide another outlet for video snippets taken from the ABC broadcast network and ABC Family cable channel shows.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2009 | Dawn C. Chmielewski
Walt Disney Co., seeking to broaden the audience for its broadcast and cable shows on the Internet's most popular video site, struck a deal Monday with Google Inc.'s YouTube to distribute short-form content from ESPN and ABC. The agreement would extend the Internet reach for ESPN's sports highlights and ABC News updates and provide another outlet for video snippets taken from the ABC broadcast network and ABC Family cable channel shows.
BUSINESS
January 30, 2009 | Dawn C. Chmielewski
Hollywood talent agencies pride themselves on placing their star clients into the biggest movies and TV shows. Now, add YouTube to the list. William Morris Agency, one of the largest talent firms, is in talks for a deal that would funnel its clients -- both actors and consumer brands -- into videos created for the Internet giant.
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