Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsYugoslavia Armed Forces
IN THE NEWS

Yugoslavia Armed Forces

NEWS
January 27, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
The communist-led Yugoslav army and the secession-minded Croatian government Saturday drew back from the edge of civil war, implementing an accord taking troops off combat readiness and demobilizing Croatian reserve police. "We were on the verge of civil war and bloodshed with catastrophic consequences," President Franjo Tudjman told the Croatian Parliament after the accord was reached.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 12, 1991 | Times Wire Services
Yugoslav forces set historic buildings ablaze in Dubrovnik with a fierce artillery bombardment Monday, and the European Community said it will pull out its six observers. "We are concerned about their safety. We plan to withdraw them at the first possible opportunity," EC mission spokesman Ed Koestal said. The Adriatic port city was rocked by an explosion every second at the height of the fourth day of shelling after its defenders refused to surrender.
NEWS
November 1, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A flotilla carrying humanitarian aid and senior Croatian officials pierced a naval blockade of Dubrovnik on Thursday, drawing cheers from thousands cut off from the rest of Croatia by a monthlong siege. The breakthrough was mostly symbolic, since the 30-odd vessels were subjected to federal navy searches that delayed their arrival by a full day.
NEWS
October 23, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Yugoslav army rejected the latest European Community peace plan and vowed to use "all available means" to crush a blockade of its barracks by rebel forces in Croatia. Defense Minister Veljko Kadijevic said the army will call up more reservists immediately to strengthen a siege of towns and ports throughout Croatia. Some of the worst fighting raged around Dubrovnik, where army forces pushed to within three miles of the medieval walled city after shelling coastal villages.
NEWS
September 3, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Violence waned in the ethnic killing fields of Croatia on Monday, but as much skepticism as hope greeted European-imposed agreement for a cease-fire there. The peace accord wrung early Monday by the 12-nation European Community from distrusting leaders of Yugoslavia's divided republics stemmed most, but not all, of the bloodshed while diplomats scrambled uphill for ways to implement the agreement.
SPORTS
September 1, 1989 | SCOTT HOWARD-COOPER, Times Staff Writer
The case of Vlade Divac, National Basketball Assn. center in waiting, took another turn Thursday, this one favorable for the Lakers. The Associated Press, quoting sources in Yugoslavia, said Divac has been given a three-year deferment for military service that will allow him to play for the Lakers this season. Instead of boot camp at Trebinje, Yugoslavia, in September, he will be at Laker camp in Honolulu in October. Such may have been regarded as news in his native land, but not in Inglewood.
NEWS
November 19, 1991 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several Western European nations announced Monday that they are ready to send warships to Yugoslavia, if needed, to establish a "humanitarian corridor" to evacuate refugees from the war-torn country. "It is not a question of military intervention but of humanitarian measures with the possibility that those participating would defend themselves," said German Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich Genscher, chairman of the nine-nation Western European Union.
NEWS
July 26, 1991 | Associated Press
Croats battled federal troops in Croatian areas bordering Serbia on Thursday, escalating fears that the secession crisis is heading toward all-out war. At least 18 militiamen and a federal army sergeant were reported killed. A session of Yugoslavia's federal collective presidency was called for today to discuss the fighting in Croatia, which declared its independence June 25 along with neighboring Slovenia.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|