Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsYugoslavia Athletics
IN THE NEWS

Yugoslavia Athletics

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
July 22, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After five days of deliberation, the United Nations decided Tuesday that its resolution prohibiting sports contacts with Yugoslavia allows individual athletes from that country, but not teams, to compete in the Summer Olympics. The United Nations "will inform the government of Spain that under no circumstances can (Yugoslav athletes) gather or participate in any kind of team gathering whatsoever," spokesman Matthew Nerzig said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
June 9, 1998
GERMANY * World Cup Record: Played 73, won 42, lost 15, tied 16, goals for 154, goals against 97. * Best Finish: Champion in 1954, 1974, 1990. * 1994 Showing: Eliminated by Bulgaria in the quarterfinals. * Coach: Berti Vogts. Nicknamed "The Terrier" from his playing days. Trying to emulate former teammate Franz Beckenbauer and become a World Cup winner as a player and a coach. * Players to Watch: Jurgen Kohler, Andry Moeller, Oliver Bierhoff, Thomas Hassler, Jurgen Klinsmann, Ulf Kirsten.
Advertisement
SPORTS
August 18, 1990 | From Associated Press
First, it was Indianapolis. Then Seoul and Seattle. Now it's Buenos Aires. The U.S. men's basketball team has proved it can lose anywhere. Led by Drazen Petrovic, Yugoslavia beat the United States, 99-91, Friday in the semifinals of the World Basketball Championships. It was the fourth consecutive major tournament in which the Americans have failed to win the gold medal, dating to the 1987 Pan American Games at Indianapolis.
SPORTS
May 16, 1998 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most politically incorrect and yet most frequently asked question in the Bay Area the past few days has been: What will Georgi Hristov think of the local women? Put another way, what will the local women think of Georgi Hristov? To understand the interest, a little background is in order. Hristov might be the only soccer player from his native Macedonia to have earned a headline beyond the borders of the former Yugoslav republic. But not for the right reasons.
SPORTS
March 19, 1990
Yugoslavian basketball star Dino Radja said Sunday he was determined to play for the Boston Celtics next season, and that his home club had agreed in principle to let him go. Radja signed with the Celtics last year for $425,000, but the contract was blocked by a U.S. federal judge, who said Radja had a valid professional commitment with his Yugoslav team Jugoplastika. "If the Celtics still want me, I'm ready to play for them next season," Radja said.
SPORTS
July 24, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY
The International Olympic Committee granted provisional recognition Thursday to the former Yugoslav republic of Bosnia-Herzegovina, enabling its athletes to march in the opening ceremony of the 25th Summer Olympics Saturday under their own flag. The IOC also announced that athletes from another former Yugoslav republic, Macedonia, will be allowed to compete in the Games, although they will not have their own flag or anthem and will wear neutral uniforms.
SPORTS
July 11, 1988 | MARK HEISLER, Times Staff Writer
Look who's coming to dinner again, Olympic basketball heights and style: It's those wild and crazy comrades of the Soviet Union men's team, undefeated champions of the European qualifying tournament. The possibility of the first U.S.-Soviet meeting in the Olympics since the infamous upset in Munich in '72 is alive. The Soviets dumped Italy, 107-86, Sunday to finish with a 7-0 record and qualify for Seoul along with Yugoslavia (6-1) and Spain (4-3).
SPORTS
June 9, 1990 | SAM McMANIS
Drazen Petrovic, a reserve guard for the Portland Trail Blazers and a former member of the Yugoslav national team, said his country's basketball federation wants him and Laker center Vlade Divac, another Yugoslav, to play in the World Championships in Argentina in August. "They want me to play in the Goodwill (Games, in July) and the championships," Petrovic said. "They want Divac to play, too. But we play double the number of games here, and I need a rest. I get a little tired.
SPORTS
June 9, 1998
GERMANY * World Cup Record: Played 73, won 42, lost 15, tied 16, goals for 154, goals against 97. * Best Finish: Champion in 1954, 1974, 1990. * 1994 Showing: Eliminated by Bulgaria in the quarterfinals. * Coach: Berti Vogts. Nicknamed "The Terrier" from his playing days. Trying to emulate former teammate Franz Beckenbauer and become a World Cup winner as a player and a coach. * Players to Watch: Jurgen Kohler, Andry Moeller, Oliver Bierhoff, Thomas Hassler, Jurgen Klinsmann, Ulf Kirsten.
NEWS
April 24, 1998 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six years ago, Ivica Kralj was a conscripted soldier fighting for Bosnia's Serbs. Today, he is the star goalkeeper of Yugoslav soccer. But as he prepares to represent his country in this summer's World Cup, he often finds himself the target of Serbian fans' harshest taunts. Kralj plays for Belgrade's Partizan club, one of the oldest in Yugoslavia. Up against archrival Red Star on a sunny Saturday afternoon, Kralj was not having a good day.
SPORTS
October 2, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Yugoslavia, a quarterfinalist in 1990, was banned from the 1994 World Cup by the international soccer federation because of United Nations sanctions against Serbia and Montenegro. FIFA said it would not replace Yugoslavia in Group 5 because European qualifying already began. Other teams in the group are Hungary, Greece, Luxembourg, Russia and Iceland.
SPORTS
July 27, 1992
Bosnian sharpshooter Mirjana Horvat could have won her country's first medal, but just taking part was enough. After four months of civil war, air raids and hunger, just being in the Olympics seemed like a miracle. Horvat, a Sarajevo student, found herself on the Olympic air rifle shooting range, competing in Barcelona's opening medal event Sunday. During the final round, she fired next to Yugoslav shooter Aranka Binder, who won the bronze medal.
SPORTS
July 24, 1992 | MIKE PENNER
Yugoslavia, the United States water polo team's archrival, was eliminated by Thursday's U.N. decision. "It's really a bummer," team captain Terry Schroeder said after '84 and '88 Olympic champion Yugoslavia was banned. "It's too bad. I feel for (the Yugoslav players). I think all the teams in the world have a lot of respect for them, what they put in. We know what it takes to get there. "We were really looking forward to have the opportunity to play them and beat them."
SPORTS
July 24, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY
The International Olympic Committee granted provisional recognition Thursday to the former Yugoslav republic of Bosnia-Herzegovina, enabling its athletes to march in the opening ceremony of the 25th Summer Olympics Saturday under their own flag. The IOC also announced that athletes from another former Yugoslav republic, Macedonia, will be allowed to compete in the Games, although they will not have their own flag or anthem and will wear neutral uniforms.
SPORTS
July 23, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yugoslavia's Olympic Committee has accepted terms established by the United Nations that will allow that country's athletes to compete in the Summer Olympics as individuals, but not as members of teams. "We are unanimous in our will to have our athletes compete in the Barcelona Olympics as individuals," the committee's secretary general, Caslav Veljic, said after a two-hour meeting Wednesday at Belgrade.
SPORTS
June 17, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Organizers scrambled to reshuffle the European pre-Olympic qualifying basketball tournament after the Spanish government refused to issue entry visas to the Yugoslav team. Yugoslavia's team has been weakened by the loss of athletes from Croatia and Slovenia, but it would have been among the favorites for an Olympic medal with squad that includes Vlade Divac of the Los Angeles Lakers and Milos Babic. The IOC is to decide July 11 if Yugoslav athletes can compete at Barcelona.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|